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Utah Taxpayers Association Praises Lawmakers for Tax Cut, Preventing Increases

The Utah Taxpayers Association gave lawmakers high marks for their efforts this year to cut taxes and adopt “sound” tax policy. (Annie Barker, Deseret News)

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SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Taxpayers Association gave lawmakers high marks for their efforts this year to cut taxes and adopt “sound tax policy.”

“Legislators passed a very broad income tax rate, which we have been asking the Legislative Assembly for throughout the past year. We appreciate the Legislative Assembly’s consideration for all ratepayers in the Utah while seeing record revenue,” said association president Rusty Cannon. statement on Tuesday.

The nearly 100-year-old organization advocates for tax relief and reform.

The taxpayers’ association also named more lawmakers as “taxpayer friend” than last year. Legislators who voted with the taxpayers’ association at least 90% of the time were included. During this year’s session, 26 representatives achieved recognition, along with 21 senators.

“Our Taxpayer Friend Award is coveted by lawmakers, and we congratulate this year’s winners for championing sound tax policy. We view the number of winners this year as proof that lawmakers understand the importance of formulating sound tax policy for Utah taxpayers,” Cannon mentioned.

One of the Legislature’s first orders of business during the session was to pass a bill to reduce Utah’s income tax rate from 4.95 percent to 4, 85%. The bill was signed by Governor Spencer Cox, making it law.

Cannon said the Utah Taxpayers Association’s annual scorecard ranked the 104 lawmakers on 15 “crucial” tax bills from this year’s session.

“The bills that were evaluated covered key issues for taxpayers such as reducing taxes, preventing tax increases, promoting fairness in Utah’s tax code, and ensuring success. economy of the state for years to come,” he said.

Among the bills supported by the association, the Utah Legislature passed:

  • HB268, which changes the definition of business income to allow a taxpayer to elect to treat all income from the sale of intangible property as business income, but creates an exemption for those who teach guided courses in a skill .
  • HJR19 to promulgate transparency rules and procedures in the budgeting and allocation process. “Taxpayers are less likely to see last-minute budget maneuvers that avoid public scrutiny,” Cannon said.
  • SB93, which eliminates sales tax for supplies used in the course of a business and exempts certain tangible personal property consumed in the performance of a taxable service from sales and use tax.
  • SB147 to reduce overall mobile phone usage costs for years to come.

“Utah has one of the highest tax and tariff burdens on telephone use in the nation, and the ratepayers association supports reducing these charges,” according to the report.

The Legislature failed to pass Hope Scholarship Bill, HB331, which was championed by the Taxpayers Association and sought to establish a scholarship program to fund Education Spending Accounts allowing families to pursue choices outside the public school system.

The report can be viewed at Utahtaxpayers.org.

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Mary Cashion

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