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If we want equality for women in Utah, we can turn to history

In the pioneer, even polygamous past, things looked more promising for women in the state.

(Rick Bowmer | AP) Neylan McBaine poses for a portrait at her home on Monday, Nov. 15, 2021, in Holladay. McBaine, a lifelong Latter-day Saint and author of the book Women at Church: Magnifying LDS Women’s Local Impact, said she wants to see more formal church positions created for women.

Let’s start with three underreported facts about Utah women.

First • On Valentine’s Day in 1870, a 23-year-old schoolteacher from Salt Lake City became the first American woman to vote in a public election.

(Utah, however, was not the first state or territory to grant women the right to vote. Wyoming obtained this distinction in December 1869. Wyoming simply had not yet held an election to put this new law in practice.)

Second • When Utah transitioned from territory to statehood in 1896, it enshrined political equality for women in its state constitution. Only two other states had yet done so.

And Third • Immediately after joining the Union, Utah became the first state to elect a woman to serve in its state legislature. Martha Hughes Cannon, a physician, beat her own husband for the seat and used her time in office to help create the Utah Department of Health.

So, what happened ? Today, Utah is known for being on the opposite end of the spectrum of equality and women’s rights. Nationally, for example, the gender pay gap is about 18%, meaning women earn 82 cents for every dollar men earn for full-time work. In Utah, it’s 30%, making Utah one of the worst states for women financially.

It’s not the only problem. Over the past four years, Utah has earned the dubious distinction of ranking last of 50 states in terms of women’s equality, as determined by 17 metrics including academic achievement, earning capacity, representation in government, business ownership and other factors.

One of the keys to implementing equal rights may be to look back to a time when things looked more promising for Utah women, especially politically. Neylan McBaine’s 2020 book “Pioneering the Vote: The Untold Story of Suffragists in Utah and the West” aims to do just that.

“How does no one know? McBaine asked when she started working on the project in 2016, referencing Utah women’s successful fight for suffrage half a century before the right was granted to women nationwide. While scholars and historians have long known of the role Utah women played in the suffrage movement, most ordinary citizens did not.

The nonprofit Better Days 2020, which McBaine co-founded, began approaching institutions and individuals for funds to increase the visibility of women in Utah history. They’ve trained 1,000 teachers across the state, developed a website as an information goldmine, created a Utah license plate to celebrate women’s suffrage, and even raised money for a statue of Martha Hughes Cannon be on permanent display at the United States Capitol.

Most people, McBaine notes, were thrilled to learn how Utah women were “leading the way” in the fight for women’s equality. But she noticed a difference in how different groups received their requests for support. Institutions other than Latter-day Saints, she said, were more receptive than was The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, despite the fact that the main players in the suffrage movement in Utah were all Latter Day Saints.

Why the hesitation? McBaine believes it’s because of polygamy, which many of Utah’s most visible women practiced in the 19th century. Cannon, for example, was the fourth wife of six.

“When we went to religious institutions or people who were members of them and told them this story, their response was, ‘We can’t talk about it. It’s going to be embarrassing for us,” McBaine said. “It was really interesting how the story was received and praised by non-members but less so by members. Today we don’t know how to grapple with the fact that this great triumph was tied to plural marriage.

McBaine also feels that some more conservative voices within the church, of which she is also an active member, may not fully agree with the notion of the advancement of women in public life and politics. After encouraging women to vote and run for public office in the 19th century, the church experienced a major entrenchment in the 20th, promoting the idea of ​​the home as the only sphere for women and organizing vigorously in the 1900s. 1970 to defeat the ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment. .

And it’s ironic, McBaine notes, because the language of the ERA as written in the 20th century was partly based on the long-standing example of the Utah Constitution, which promised that ” the rights of citizens of the state of Utah to vote and hold office shall not be denied or abridged on the grounds of sex”. The wording of the 1972 ERA was that “equal rights under the law shall not be denied or restricted by the United States or any state on account of sex.”

“We’ve been living under this law all this time, but since there’s no case law, people don’t really know it exists,” McBaine said. “A lot of fears surround the ERA, but we could have seen that they were unwarranted by looking at our own state’s constitution.”

McBaine sees reason for hope, both for Utah women and for Latter-day Saint women. For one thing, this book was published by Shadow Mountain, the national imprint of Deseret Book, the official publishing house of the church. Which means the church has a desire to see this story reclaimed.

McBaine also sees greater openness in the church to women’s voices, including greater attention to the Heavenly Mother, “and the normalization of Heavenly Parents. It’s been a lifesaver for a lot of people.

That’s not to say there isn’t room for improvement. McBaine recently attended a ward conference for his congregation in which there were 37 men at the helm—including the entire stake (area) high council and many male priesthood leaders—and only one woman, who led the hymns.

“There is absolutely no excuse for this,” McBaine said.

“There needs to be a general reassessment of gendered leadership from the top down,” she added. “I don’t know what more we can do at the local level to really change the administration. It must be a massive, global change from below or come from the top down.

“I will say the next thing that has to happen is that the girls have to pass the sacrament. And soon, otherwise we will continue to lose my own daughters and the daughters of their generation.

(The views expressed in this opinion piece do not necessarily reflect those of Religion News Service.)

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Salt lake city

Who starts in goal for Real Salt Lake when David Ochoa returns from injury?

SALT LAKE CITY – Real Salt Lake have been without last year’s starting goalie, David Ochoa, who remains sidelined with an injured quad. So it was veteran shooter Zac MacMath who stepped in and performed admirably throughout the first three weeks of the season.

It’s unclear how long Ochoa will be out for, however, it doesn’t or doesn’t look like he’ll be back in the starting XI anytime soon after manager Pablo Mastroeni admitted he hasn’t trained yet with the team.

MacMath’s tenure in goal this season has been impressive. In the first two games against Dallas and Seattle, he kept clean sheets. Then, in snow and wind in Foxborough, Massachusetts, he allowed the first goal of the season 225 minutes into the campaign. MacMath has found form and is playing extremely well.

Assuming the form of MacMath continues, what will happen when Ochoa becomes available for selection?

“I think it’s a tricky situation,” admitted Mastroeni when asked how he plans to handle the unavoidable situation. “I think David [Ochoa] finished the season last year in a terrific way and started the majority of pre-season games, but you want to create a competitive environment. What I’ve learned from managing over the years that I’ve done this, which didn’t last long, is that you can’t fix problems in the future. Future situations will resolve themselves, and when that time comes, you will deal with them. You don’t know all the variables that come into play, you don’t know the flow of the form, the results… solving the problem now would be futile and I learned that you can’t do that.

For now, it will be MacMath as the starting goaltender and when Ochoa returns to full health, Mastroeni will assess the variables and make his decision on that. Who knows, maybe when Ochoa returns, the decision will already be made for Mastroeni.

next game

Real Salt Lake will return home to host Nashville next Saturday, March 19, with kickoff scheduled for 7:30 p.m.

The match will be available to watch via the KSL Sports or KSL 5 TV app or on KSL Sports dot com.

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Utah economy

Brammer briefs Highland City Council after legislative session | News, Sports, Jobs


Evan Cobb, Daily Herald file photo

Attorney Brady Brammer speaks during oral argument before the Utah Supreme Court at the Matheson Courthouse Thursday, April 18, 2019, in Salt Lake City.

Rep. Brady Brammer, R-Highland, spoke at the Highland City Council meeting on Tuesday, providing an update on changes made in the 2022 Utah Legislative General Session that could affect the city.

“There’s a saying, never blame a legislative body for doing nothing because when it does nothing it hurts no one, when it does something it becomes dangerous,” Brammer said. “Unfortunately, there’s been a lot that’s been done this session…most of it is pretty positive.”

Brammer began his presentation by commending the State of Utah for its fiscal management and fiscal responsibility. Brammer said education funding per student increased by 6% and $248 million was paid into a stabilization account in hopes of maintaining a strong education fund.

“Because the education system relies heavily on income tax revenue, it’s a more variable source of revenue, so in 2008 when our economy fell, our education revenue went up. dropped significantly,” he said. “So what we’ve been trying to do is build a fund while times have been good since 2008.”

Brammer said $1.2 billion was allocated for transportation in the general session, much of which he said could be used in Utah County.

“Because Utah County is a high-growth area, it’s starting to rank very well in the transportation criteria that roads are going to be built for,” Brammer said. “Highland does have a state road which is SR 92, so we don’t see a lot of that…but the need for infrastructure in the northwest part of Utah County is quite significant.”

Brammer mentioned his success in passing the Utah Lake Authority Bill HB 232, which he sponsored alongside Senator Michael K. McKell. He said the Utah Lake Authority will be able to wield more influence than the Utah Lake Commission and will raise money from the state level rather than local budgets, as planned in the Utah Lake Commission. ‘origin.

“It’s a tighter group that has a lot more local control than the commission had,” Brammer said. “And so really what we get with this authority is the ability to have more pressure on the lake from a local voice with more state funding. We did well on this one.

Brammer, who is also a lawyer, represents Highland, Pleasant Grove, Cedar Hills and Alpine in Home District 27, which will soon become District 54 under new boundaries.

“I’m still recovering and processing whatever happens during the session,” Brammer said. “It’s a fast 45 days, but it’s a busy 45 days.”



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Salt lake city

Salt Lake Police are asking for help in locating a robbery suspect

SOUTH SALT LAKE – Police in South Salt Lake and Salt Lake City are asking the public for help in locating an armed robbery suspect.

Detectives from both departments work as a team to find a man suspected of aggravated robbery at two different cell phone stores.

One of them happened Monday morning at the T-Mobile store at 3300 South Street near State Street in South Salt Lake City.

According to witnesses, the man entered calmly, demanded money and lifted his shirt to show he had a handgun in his belt.

The police believe it was the same man who robbed the other mobile phone store in the same way.

According to Danielle Croyle of the South Salt Lake Police Department, the suspect is about six feet tall, with dark hair and a slight build. On both flights, he wore a glove on his left hand only.

“Displaying a gun and threatening or using it in a threatening way to hurt (people) causes undue stress for everyone involved,” Croyle said.

Detectives aren’t sure if he’s trying to cover up an obvious feature like a tattoo or a scar, but they think he’s dangerous and needs to be caught quickly.

They are asking anyone with information about the suspect or these crimes to call South Salt Lake Police at 840-4000 or Salt Lake Police, 801-799-3000.

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Utah economy

Housing market 2022: how will rising interest rates affect prices?

The Federal Reserve is expected to raise interest rates this week – likely by 0.25% – for the first time in three years, in hopes of containing soaring inflation.

As a result, mortgage rates will also rise. So what will this mean for the housing market?

In the West, especially for high-demand states like Utah, it’s not good.

“It’s bad,” said Dejan Eskic, senior fellow at the University of Utah’s Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute, who specializes in housing research.

While the nation’s average 30-year fixed mortgage rate has edged closer to 4%, 67% of Utah households are “locked out” of the state’s median price home, according to Eskic’s calculations.

The median priced single-family home in Utah was $512,000 statewide in the fourth quarter of 2021, according to the National Association of Realtors.

“A full two-thirds of Utah can’t afford the median-priced home anywhere because of how quickly rates have gone up over the past two months,” Eskic said.

The average 30-year fixed mortgage rate in the United States hit a record low of 2.65% in January 2021, but has jumped to 3.85% in the past three months.

If interest rates rise even further, approaching 4.5% or 5%, that percentage of Utahns who can’t afford the median-priced home could jump even closer to 70%, Eskic said.

“If you had to wait to buy in the spring, you’re probably out of luck,” Eskic said, as rising interest rates push even more homes out of reach with higher monthly loan payments.

Wait, shouldn’t higher interest rates help lower demand?

Utah’s housing problem continues to be a supply and demand issue. Shouldn’t the rise in interest rates therefore help to curb demand?

Not in today’s market, Eskic said.

Rising interest rates will slow demand, he said, but not “enough to completely slow the market because there is nothing to buy.”

Low inventory remains a big problem that is sending home prices skyrocketing.

“Typically when we see rates go up, we see a slowdown in demand. We are seeing a slowdown in prices. Sometimes the price actually goes down,” Eskic said, like when they did from mid-2018 to January 2019. Then rates hit nearly 5% and the state saw its median sale price go from $310,000 to $301,000.

But in today’s market? Don’t expect to see prices drop, he said.

“Over the past two months, rates have gone up dramatically, and we haven’t seen anything like it,” he said. “We don’t see any indication of (price) falling because stocks are so low.”

“In a normal environment,” or if the housing market was the same as it was in 2019, Eskic said interest rate hikes would cause prices to “decelerate.”

But Utah’s 2022 market is far from normal.

“The inventory is so low it’s non-existent,” he said, noting that at this time of year UtahRealEstate.com would typically have between 7,000 and 9,000 active homes for sale. “And right now, we probably have 2,000.”

“Because of that, we’re still expecting to see some pretty healthy price increases,” he said.

Even with so many Utahns sold out, Eskic said there are plenty of buyers still driving demand up, many of whom have migrated to Utah.

“It’s those two factors,” he said, “low inventory and immigration.”

The COVID-19 pandemic has upended housing markets across the country as thousands of Americans reassessed their lives and left big cities in search of more space at lower prices. Many looked west, especially to states like Utah, where jobs were booming, and Idaho, where housing was relatively affordable.

As a result, states like Utah and Idaho had record years for home sales and price increases. In Utah, experts have warned of a “severely unbalanced” housing market as demand continues to dramatically outpace supply.

But it’s not just the pandemic’s fault. This has only worsened and accelerated the housing problem in Utah. The housing shortage in the West began years ago in the midst of the Great Recession, after the subprime mortgage crisis sent the national and global economy into a death spiral. After the crash, homebuilding contracted and the market has struggled to keep up with demand ever since.

Will higher interest rates lower prices?

Higher interest rates may slow price increases, Eskic said, but it won’t stop them.

It will only lift what Eskic called a “mask” that has essentially hidden or softened the impact on homebuyers’ monthly payments.

In 2021, Utah home prices rose 27% statewide, breaking the 20.1% record set in 1978, set 43 years ago, according to the Salt Lake Lake Board of Realtors.

Unfortunately, in 2022 there isn’t a lot of good news for potential buyers. Prices are expected to rise further thanks to low inventories – but the good news is that they will only rise by perhaps 10%, Eskic said, instead of more than 20%.

This slice of good news rings hollow, however, when prices reach record highs.

“It will only slow the acceleration,” Eskic said. “That won’t stop him.”

So in 2022, “we’re still in a sore housing market,” he said, and he doesn’t see relief until “later in the decade, unfortunately,” when aging Utahns decide to trade in their large batches against “simplified”. », smaller batches.

For aspiring homebuyers who have been waiting, hoping prices might come down — hoping the bubble will burst like it did in 2008 — Eskic said there’s no indication the wait will lead to lower prices. price.

Even though prices are painful today, if it makes sense for you and your family, Eskic advised pulling the trigger now rather than waiting.

“It will be much cheaper to buy now,” he said, “than it will be two or three years from now.”

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Salt lake city government

Analysis of the news of March 14, 2022

99.1% of close contacts of patients infected with Omicron diagnosed within 10 days

Last weekend at Emerging infectious diseasesSouth Korean researchers reported that the average time from exposure to diagnosis of COVID-19 was 3.7 days among quarantined close contacts of patients infected with the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant and that 99, 1% of diagnoses occurred on day 10, supporting a 10-day quarantine period.

The study assessed the time from exposure to diagnosis among 107 close contacts from two Omicron groups on November 24 and 25, 2021. In South Korea, close contacts of Omicron patients were mandated to self-quarantine for 14 days amid surges, regardless of symptoms and vaccination status. Contacts were tested for COVID-19 on days 1, 9 and 13.

The average time between exposure and diagnosis was 3.7 days. Of all contacts, 50% were diagnosed on day 3, while 70% were diagnosed on day 5 and 99.1% on day 10. One diagnosis occurred on day 13 in an unvaccinated child who had previously been tested negative.

Half of contacts in all age groups were diagnosed on day 3. Among contacts with symptoms of COVID-19, half of diagnoses occurred on day 3 and 70% on day 5. Diagnoses of COVID-19 19 among contacts without symptoms occurred in 50% on day 5 and 70% on day 8.

The results of the study led the South Korean government to shorten the quarantine from 14 to 10 days and to 7 days in times of limited capacity due to surge in quarantine facilities.

The researchers noted that unpublished data from a previous study suggested that Omicron’s incubation period may be shorter than that of the Delta variant. “Estimating the duration of infectivity is more difficult than measuring incubation periods; a study that measured viral load from Omicron suggested that viral load fell by 10-13 days, which is consistent with our findings.

While the most effective COVID-19 containment measures are isolation and quarantine, the authors noted that these strategies come with personal and socioeconomic costs. “A 10-day quarantine period can encompass most people exposed to Omicron; however, the duration of quarantine may become shorter after balancing the societal cost with the public health benefits,” they concluded.
March 11 Urgent disinfection search letter

Support tool related to better antibiotic prescribing for pneumonia patients

A real-time electronic decision support tool has helped community hospital clinicians provide best care practices to emergency department patients with pneumonia and has been associated with a decrease in intensive care unit admissions (ICU), more appropriate use of antibiotics and an overall 38% reduction in deaths according to a study last week in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

For the study, researchers at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City, Utah, deployed the healthcare system’s electronic open-loop clinical decision support (ePNa) system in 16 of its community hospitals in December 2017 to June 2019. During this period, these hospitals had 6,848 cases of pneumonia and a treating clinician used ePNa in 67% of eligible patients.

The support tool brings together more than 50 key patient indicators, including age, fever, oxygen saturation, lab and chest imaging results, and vital signs to make care decisions, including appropriate antibiotic therapy, laboratory studies, and treatment setting recommendations, such as admission to intensive care. , hospital admission or discharge. The median patient age was 67, 48% were female, and 64.8% were admitted to hospital.

Using the tool, Intermountain researchers found a range of positive patient outcomes, including a 38% relative reduction in mortality 30 days after a pneumonia diagnosis, with the largest reduction in mortality rates in patients admitted directly from the emergency department to the ICU. Guideline-compliant antibiotic prescribing increased from 83.5% to 90.2% (P

Other results were a 61% increase in the number of patients treated on an outpatient basis (from 29.2% to 46.9%), a decrease in admissions to intensive care without safety problems and a reduction in the average time between admission to emergency and the start of the first antibiotic, going from 159.4 minutes to 150.9 minutes.

The researchers say the results are consistent with a previous study involving the use of the ePNa system in large Intermountain hospitals.

“Our study found that clinicians were able to make better treatment decisions with this resource,” first author Nathan Dean, MD, said in an Intermountain press release. “Some of our community hospitals have as few as 20 beds. We wanted to validate the effectiveness of ePNa in very different healthcare settings.”
March 9 Am J Respir Crit Care Med study
March 9 Intermountain Healthcare Press release

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Salt lake city

‘Real Housewives of Salt Lake City’ Season 3: 5 things you need to know about the Bravo reality show

There’s more to Salt Lake City than mountains and religion. RHOSLC (Real Housewives of Salt Lake City) is an American reality television series that debuted on Bravo on November 11, 2020. It focuses on the personal and professional lives of women living in or around Salt Lake City, Utah, and is the ninth installment in The Real Housewives franchise. Lisa Barlow, Heather Gay, Meredith Marks, Whitney Rose and Jen Shah make up the current cast. Mary Cosby and Jennie Nguyen were among the previous cast members to be featured.

However, before getting into the details of this show, you should ask yourself if you are interested in watching “Real Housewives of New Jersey”, “Kandi & The Gang” and “Real Housewives of Miami”.

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When is ‘Real Housewives of Salt Lake City’ season 3 coming out and where can you watch it?

Keep watching this space for more release date updates as no official release date has yet been announced for the show.

What is ‘Real Housewives of Salt Lake City’ Season 3 all about?

According to Bravo’s synopsis, Lisa continues to be a busy working mother with her enterprising children and devoted husband John by her side. When the women repeatedly question her motives, she quickly finds herself at the center of the drama. Mary’s life has changed dramatically as a result of the pandemic; she was forced to close her church and started a faith-based podcast to fill the void. When rumors about Mary become a topic of conversation when Lisa’s acquaintance uncovers troubling accusations, friendships are tested. While Heather’s business, Beauty Lab + Laser, is booming and about to expand to a second location, her home life isn’t quite so simple. Heather struggles to break Mormon customs and push her eldest daughter to enjoy a secular life as she prepares to leave the nest.

Meredith and Seth are still going strong after reconciling last year, but there seem to be a few rifts in their foundation. As Meredith focuses on her relationship with Seth, she finds herself at odds with her best friend Lisa when loyalty issues arise. Whitney struggles to juggle it all, as her booming business has taken her away from her obligations as a stay-at-home mom, causing a rift in her personal life with Justin. When Whitney gets in the way of Lisa’s longtime relationship with one of her best friends, tensions erupt. Jen struggles to channel her inner zen and heal the vital bonds in her life this season, but when accusations are leveled against her, her world comes crashing down. She will fight for her life as she discovers who her true friends are and wonders who could have turned her in. Jennie, who was introduced to the group by Lisa, isn’t shy about asking the tough questions and diving straight into the drama. Jennie, a successful, married entrepreneur and mother of three, has just sold her medical spas to focus on her children. As Jennie spends more time at home, her husband Duy begins to pressure her to have more children, and when she refuses, he is willing to consider all alternatives, even a sister wife.

Who stars in ‘Real Housewives of Salt Lake City’ Season 3?

Lisa Barlow, Mary Cosby, Heather Gay, Meredith Marks, Whitney Rose, Jen Shah and Jennie Nguyen will be featured on the show.

Showrunner

Scott Dunlop is the creator of “Real Housewives of Salt Lake City”. Executive producers include Lisa Shannon, Dan Peirson, Lori Gordon, Chaz Morgan and Andy Cohen. The production company is Shed Media.

Trailer

Bravo recently released Part 3 of the RHOSLC Reunion Now! On the official site. Check it out.

If you have an entertainment scoop or story for us, please contact us at (323) 421-7515

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Salt lake city government

File of new faces for the desktop | Government and politics

DAILY ELKO

ELKO — Political newcomers threw their hats into the ring this week, running for office in multiple city and county races.

For Elko County Commission District 4, attorney Travis Gerber and Ryndon resident Steven Grimes filed their candidacies this week, vying for the seat currently held by Cliff Eklund, which will expire at the end of the year.

Gerber, whose father Grant Gerber served on the County Commission, said Grant “was a great advocate for Elko County. He grew up here, he understood values, farming and mining. He knew the people of Elko County and loved them.

“Those are big boots to fill, but I had enough time with him – I practiced law with him for 12 years – and I spent my life with him and it rubbed off on me and my brother Zachary,” Gerber said. “We would like to continue this legacy and continue to drive these values ​​forward.”

He added that he has watched county commissioners work with the new tax structure, “looking at how those funds are prioritized and allocated.”

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“I’m encouraged the county is solvent,” added Gerber, who lives in Spring Creek. “That the county improve its extinguishing and firefighting capability with the new engines that have been purchased and the new fire station in Lamoille.”

Citing his father’s position on land use rights for grazing, Gerber said he was “interested in making sure the Canyon de Lamoille doesn’t burn anymore.” It could have been avoided and should have been.

He said he agreed with the way county commissioners were proceeding. “My goal is to continue that legacy and continue to make sound, solid decisions for the county.”

Grimes said he has lived in Elko County since 2004 and wants to “give back to this community as much as possible, or at least help and try to improve this community as much as possible.”

He said roads were one area he wanted to fix, using his own grader for roadworks “but the county can’t come in and do that”.

He also said he would like to fix the map mapping on apps. “All these map services, and you try to find an address, it doesn’t know exactly where to take you,” Grimes said. “Someone needs to step up and clean up the mapping.”

Grimes, who worked for Vega Construction before taking time off for shoulder surgery and rehabilitation, said he currently serves in the Civil Air Patrol, helping organize a local REACT chapter for emergency response. emergencies and disasters. Additionally, he is taking flight lessons to fly a search and rescue plane.

He recalled how lost hikers or others stranded in the mountains could have been located, and said a REACT group could have made a difference.

Grimes said he would also introduce or support an order to protect employees who have been laid off due to their Covid-19 vaccination status.

“Employers must be held accountable for their actions,” he said.

Grimes also explained that he thinks the county commission needs people who “get to work instead of saying why we can’t get to work.”

Mike Hagen, who runs Bristlecone Bikes, filed for mayor against incumbent Reece Keener.

He cited Covid-19 regulations that closed businesses or limited operations as the reason for his candidacy. “No questions were asked. The mayor did nothing to research what was really going on. The mayor must keep control. I don’t want this to happen again,” he said.

“Trade is vital to our survival as a city and the closing of businesses is retroactive to that,” Hagen continued.

Hagen said he had lived in Elko for eight years. He lived in Reno, where he ran for mayor, but moved out after Reno “got too liberal.” I came back where it’s safe. Elko is a very conservative town. I’m very conservative, but I’m not too conservative. I like to see myself right in the middle.

He said he was for legal marijuana and would like to see dispensaries open “because it’s a great source of revenue for the city.” It’s going to take some zoning. The city council said we weren’t going to create a zone for marijuana dispensaries. I would like that to change.

Adding more infrastructure to Elko is another of Hagen’s goals if elected. Specifically, he suggested building a bridge over the railroad tracks and the Humboldt River at the east end of town. “A more direct route to Spring Creek. We now have infrastructure money, so it’s viable.

Hagen has served as a director of various businesses in Salt Lake City and Reno, and he said he thinks Elko needs a “managing mayor” in addition to the city manager.

“We need someone who is going to lead this city in which we are not afraid to grow,” he explained. “A lot of people are afraid to change the small town mentality and grow, but if we’re going to survive as a town, we’re going to have to grow and offer all the great things that Elko has to offer to others.”

Wells businesswoman Bella Cummins ran against Elko County Sheriff Aitor Narvaiza on Friday, saying she was “the people’s choice for constitutional sheriff.”

“Our county became a constitutional county during Covid. Now is the time to stop talking about it and implement the rights and benefits of the constitution into law enforcement so our citizens can realize them,” Cummins said.

She added that she “cannot be bought. I hate hiring practices, management and enforcement through backdoor tactics and good old boy methods. We must all benefit from the upholders of the constitution and the regulations must be applied fairly and equitably. »

The owner of Bella’s Hacienda Ranch in Wells cited her business background for her knowledge of the law. “I run legal businesses in this county and have done so for over 30 years. I understand the laws and no one is better equipped to serve the citizens of our county as a sheriff,” she said.

“I stand for law enforcement that upholds the letter and spirit of the law for all. And that includes opportunities for law enforcement personnel based on hiring and retention policies fair,” she added. “I will lead and protect all the people of our county. I will uphold the rights granted to us under the great Constitution of the United States and see that they are guaranteed. to the citizens of our county, I represent freedom, fairness and responsibility.

Eve Daz of Spring Creek filed her candidacy against appointee Matt McCarty for District 3 of the Elko County School Board. She worked at the Elko Courthouse for eight years, but transferred to Elko County’s IT department last summer.

Daz said she has three children, one of whom is “just starting her journey through the Elko County school system,” and two graduating from Spring Creek and attending colleges in Tucson, Arizona and Reno. She said she is running as a candidate who “cares about the education that our community is raising.”

“I want to do everything I can to make sure he has the opportunities his older siblings had. I care about my kids and I care about your kids,” she wrote in a post. communicated.

“I can no longer sit idly by and hope for the best,” she continued. “The only way to have a bright future is to be an active participant in ensuring that our children and our community are guided towards a brighter future.”

Filing continues at the City Clerk’s Office and the Elko County Clerk’s Office until 5 p.m. on March 18.

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Salt lake city

Utah ‘Dancing With The Stars’ pro proposes to his girlfriend

by: Kiah Armstrong

Job :

Update:

(ABC4) — Last Monday, famous “Dancing with the Stars” pro Brandon Armstrong proposed to his girlfriend in Salt Lake City.

Armstrong proposed to girlfriend Brylee Ivers, 23, through a trailer he created as family and friends gathered for the couple’s special moment, according to People magazine.

Several cast members of “Dancing with the Stars” commented under Armstrong Instagram post where he announced the couple’s engagement on Tuesday.

“Yesssss congratulations to you both,” exclaimed “Dancing With The Stars” pro Sasha Farber.

Armstrong, originally from California, moved to Utah at age 12 where he began dancing and training in all styles including jazz, hip hop and contemporary. .

He danced four seasons on Dancing with the Stars and his former partners on the show have been Tinashe, TV personality Jeannie Mai, The Real Housewives of Atlanta Kenya Moore and former Supremes singer Mary Wilson.

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Salt lake city government

“Devastating”: school meals programs in danger

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) — A significant impact from the lack of pandemic funding could be felt in canteens across the country and right here in Utah.

This funding included waivers for school lunch programs.

The loss of these waivers is to local school districts.

The federal government has until Friday to decide whether it wants to keep the pandemic waivers for school meals.

For now, it is not included in the $1.5 trillion spending bill.

The Salt Lake City School District and Granite Schools both said there would be serious consequences if this is not continued.

The spending plan approved by the House of Representatives on Wednesday is missing a key element according to the School Nutrition Association; one that some Utah school districts say will leave them scrambling.

“It will be devastating,” said Kelly Orton, child nutrition director for the Salt Lake City School District.

School districts like the Salt Lake City School District will face serious consequences if the federal government removes pandemic waivers for school lunch programs.

“We won’t have the funds to support the rising cost of fuel and labor and everything that’s going on around us,” Orton said.

The waivers allowed schools to provide free meals to all students and expand meal services in communities.

Orton said without an extension, schools would cut summer lunch programs and face major problems.

“As a result, school districts across the country, including the Salt Lake School District, are going to have to seek out our own taxpayers, our own funding through school districts, and pull that funding out of textbooks and schools,” Orton said.

Ben Horsley of Granite Schools said there could also be issues.

“Yes and no,” Horsley said. “This is going to impact our families and again, eligible families will still be able to receive free or reduced price lunches. All they have to do is complete the application.

The federal program did not require an application, and as it stands, it expires on June 30.

Orton said he and state superintendents are calling on community members for help.

Child nutrition staff in Salt Lake schools are 30% understaffed.

“We really need manpower,” Orton said. “We need people to help serve lunch. We don’t have enough people to serve lunch. We are closing our service lines because we don’t have enough staff. So if we had people from the community to help us serve lunch, that would help us tremendously. »

Orton said he and his colleagues want Congress to extend the program for at least another year so they can put a plan in place.

From now on, if the program expires, Orton said school lunch prices could be $5 per meal and funds for teachers, textbooks and technology will have to be cut.

Locally, there are always free and reduced lunches offered, however, districts have said that these meals will cost them, the district itself, more, and they will have to figure out how to pay for them as gas is more expensive, food is more expensive and there is a labor shortage.

If you are interested in working in school cafeterias in Salt Lake City, click here.

For Granite Schools, click here.

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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City police recover over 160 stolen cars, thousands of dollars in drugs and guns

by: Viviane Chow

Job :

Update:

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – Being a police officer can be a tiring undertaking. Officers are constantly working to keep dangerous objects and people away from local streets.

Salt Lake City police provided a summary of figures of some illegal bounties they have collected over the past month.

With Utah Vehicle Theft Classified among one of the highest nationwide, SLCPD says it recovered 169 stolen vehicles last month. They say the percentage averages around six vehicles recovered per day.

With drug distributors using Utah “well-developed transport infrastructure”, federal officials say the state plays a “significant staging area” for the illicit distribution of goods across the United States

The SLCPD played its part in keeping the drugs off the streets by seizing a total of $57,961.60 in February.

Authorities say they also seized 35 firearms. SLCPD states that when something is high priority, their average response time to a priority 1 situation is around 10 minutes and 25 seconds.

Just another day in the life of a Salt Lake City cop.

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Utah economy

Economic Impacts of the Russian Invasion of Ukraine: What Can Utah Expect?

Gas prices in Utah and across the country have soared in recent weeks, largely due to the economic fallout from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and further compounded by President Joe Biden’s decision , announced Tuesday, to ban US imports of Russian oil and gas.

But alongside record high gasoline and diesel prices, which not only hit consumers on a daily basis, but can drive up the prices of a wide variety of goods and services, what other economic impacts will residents and businesses in Utah expect to see as Russia’s military aggression against Ukraine approaches the three-week mark?

On Tuesday, the Salt Lake House convened a panel of local economic and business experts, along with Republican Utah Sen. Mitt Romney, to discuss how Utah is dealing with the unrest as they continue to unfold and disrupt global economic systems.

Romney, who is a member of the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said he supports Biden’s actions in response to Russia’s invasion, but also noted that current and previous administrations have not done so. enough to help build a bulwark in Ukraine to deter Russian aggression.

“I think you have to give the president and his administration real credit for bringing together so many nations, within NATO and some outside of NATO, to come together to put in place the sanctions that have been established,” Romney said. “And they got tougher partly because public opinion around the world…has been so overwhelmingly opposed to Russia that nations have been willing to sign tougher sanctions than I think could have been expected. .

“The big mistake of this administration was not providing enough weapons to Ukraine to really scare Russia off and I think that was a mistake not only of this administration but of previous administrations, Republican and Democratic alike. We we simply did not take the threat of a Russian invasion seriously enough to ensure that Ukraine had the defensive armament necessary to repel an attack.

Romney noted that several commodity indices were at or near historic highs this week and said it was too early to predict what future volatility to expect in global markets. He shared his concerns that European nations, which are much more dependent on Russian exports of energy and raw materials, could be pushed into an economic recession that has a chance of dragging the United States down with it. And, he noted that the global impacts were almost certain to fuel further inflationary pressures on consumers in Utah and across the country.

While escalating gasoline prices may be the earliest and most visible evidence of global market disruptions – Utah’s average price per gallon rose nearly 70 cents last week and was at $4.19 Wednesday according to AAA, just three cents off the state’s all-time high. – the Beehive State, on average, uses less gas than most.

Natalie Gochnour, associate dean at the University of Utah’s David Eccles School of Business and director of the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute at U., attended Tuesday’s economic forum and said the great outdoors of Utah may lead to believe the state’s residents are, collectively, doing a lot of driving. But the data suggests otherwise.

“We are one of the lowest users per capita in the country,” Gochnour said. “It might surprise people because you would think we all drive long distances, but (our population) is very compact, very urban.”

Gochnour also noted that the high prices at the pump reflect that oil producers are getting the best price for the crude oil they extract and that Utah is one of the best states in the country when it comes to oil production, producing 87,000 barrels per day based on 2020 data.

And it’s a boon for local oil companies.

“When oil prices go up, if you’re not an energy-producing state, you’re only doing harm,” Gochnour said. “But when you’re an energy-producing state, you can benefit…and Utah is the 11th-largest oil-producing state in the nation.”

Gochnour said that in addition to oil and gas exports, other commodity markets in which Russian producers play an important role, such as wheat and some metals, are experiencing price escalation and that these factors come at a time when US inflation rose at its fastest. rate in decades. And this convergence of factors is likely to further fuel inflationary pressures.

But there is another factor that is likely to work in Utah’s favor when it comes to weathering the negative economic repercussions of sanctions aimed at isolating Russia from the rest of the world.

Gochnour cited pre-pandemic data indicating that of Utah’s $17 billion in exports in 2019, only about $20 million went to Russian markets. The state’s major international economic export markets are, in order, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Mexico. Russia ranked 43rd, by dollar value, in terms of export volumes that year.

Of these $20 million in Russian exports, about $6.3 million were food products, while machinery accounted for about $3.2 million and miscellaneous manufacturing generated about $3.2 million in value of goods. ‘export.

Miles Hansen, panel member and president/CEO of the World Trade Center Utah, who also spent years in the Middle East and Eastern Europe working for the US State Department, said a growing list of companies were restricting their activities in Russia and noted the impacts, due to the sanctions and the invasion itself, were also disrupting European markets in a way that required new calibrations for Utah companies there present.

“(Utah’s business community) needs to buckle up and focus on resilience,” Hansen said. “We cannot apply the practices of doing business in Europe as usual. This is going to have lasting impacts not only on raw materials, mining and energy, but also on other aspects of the economy.

But Hansen said he believes Utah is entering the current turmoil in a very strong economic position, and new opportunities will likely arise for Utah businesses that are nimble and looking for new markets.

Gochnour also sees Utah’s diverse and growing economy well positioned to meet the challenges ahead emanating from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

“In Utah, we go into this global conflict in a very strong position,” Gochnour said. “We have the fastest growing economy in the country and we are one of only four states whose economy has grown in the last two years.”

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Salt lake city government

Watch Big Brother | Hits and misses | Salt Lake City

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Watch big brother
There’s the legalese, and then there’s the legislature creatively using the English language to make them seem smarter than the average bear. And sure enough, almost all of their Acts this session sent the message that, yes, they’re smarter than you, they know better than you, and you better swallow it all. Let’s first talk about how something might “involve the principles of federalism or state sovereignty”, which The Salt Lake Grandstand fortunately put in quotes. In the real world, to implicate means to show that something or someone is involved in a criminal prosecution. Are the principles of federalism and state sovereignty doing something criminal? That’s not what Rep. Ken Ivory, R-West Jordan, meant with his bill, HB209, which seeks to police the federal government. And they’re going to ask a third party to do that “check” and decide what exactly those principles of federalism are, if not someone’s questionable interpretation of the Constitution.

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fire away
We’re talking about gun laws again and the multitude of ways “the militia” has come to mean anyone, anytime, with any weapon and doing anything with it. . What happened was that Michael Clara, 58, fired at a truck that drove away after hitting his 4Runner, KSL reported. Clara, an outspoken and pompous political activist, said he was defending himself, believing his life was in danger. Yeah, his bullets totally missed the fleeing truck but nearly killed a young girl in the back seat of another vehicle. “Although it disturbs me to hear the story of a young child who was nearly killed in the back seat of his car while traveling down the street, my hands are tied by the demands imposed by the legislature in the new law,” a judge said. That’s because Rep. Karianne Lisonbee, R-Clearfield, literally cut and pasted Florida’s self-defense law, where “hold your ground” now means “prepare to die.”

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call of spades
As the Republican Party turns into anarchic fascism, Utah Senator Mitt Romney stands firm with the old guard, you know, the moral ones. “I have to think anybody who sat down with white nationalists and spoke at their conference was definitely missing a few IQ points,” Romney told CNN. This after he called Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Georgia, and Paul Gosar, R-Arizona, “morons” because they attended America’s first political action conference amid cheers frenzied “Putin! Putin!” Romney also voted twice to impeach the former US president and faced backlash from the conservative right in Utah. But he can handle it, for now. He won’t run again until 2024, so he has some time to curry favor with the Utah right and make sure he doesn’t fall into the hands of the GOP fringe.

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Salt lake city

Opening of the IRS SLC office for the preparation of tax returns

by: Kiah Armstrong

Job :

Update:

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – The Salt Lake City Internal Revenue Service (IRS) office will open this weekend for face-to-face assistance with tax matters.

The office will be located at 178 South Rio Grande St. and will be open Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to assist residents with any tax issues or questions they may have regarding filing taxes.

The agency will not prepare returns, but taxpayers can ask questions about reconciling child tax credit prepayments, receive assistance with resolving a tax issue, tax bill, or IRS audit. If assistance from IRS employees who specialize in these services is not available, the individual will receive a referral for these services.

The IRS is also urging taxpayers to come prepared with the following information:

  • Current government-issued photo ID
  • Social Security cards and/or ITINs for members of their household, including spouse and dependents (if applicable)
  • Any IRS letters or notices received and related documents

During the visit, IRS staff may also request the following information:

  • A current mailing address, and
  • Bank account information, to receive payments or refunds by direct deposit

IRS staff will schedule appointments at a later date for deaf or hard of hearing individuals who require sign language interpretation services. Foreign language interpreters will be available.

Appointments are not mandatory.

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Utah economy

“Blindfolded, Balaclavas, and Handcuffs”: How Some Teens Access Utah’s Youth Treatment Programs

Katey Handel still remembers the fear she felt more than a decade ago when – at 17 – she woke up to a scruffy man towering over her.

“We can do it easily,” she recalled telling him. “Or we can do it the hard way. But you come with me.

It was 2008. Handel was living in Louisiana and had just found out she was pregnant. It had been a crisis for her family, she recalls. His older sister had come to visit and found them a hotel room to talk and spend time together.

Handel had no idea why there were now two strangers in this room, one of them grabbing her from her bed.

“I felt like I had no choice,” she said. “So I went with him. I knew then that I was pregnant. So, I didn’t want to go the hard way, whatever route that meant.

That man was Daniel Taylor, who at the time ran a youth treatment center in Cedar City, Utah called Integrity House. He had gone to Louisiana to bring Handel to his establishment with his parents’ permission. Surprising her in the middle of the night was part of the plan.

Outside the hotel room, Handel’s father was waiting in his SUV, she recalled. He was told to ride in the back with Taylor. Her father then drove them to the airport and Taylor flew with her to Cedar City, where she would stay for the next four months.

The way Handel was taken to Utah is a common tactic in the so-called “troubled teen” industry. With a parent’s consent, two people are sent to surprise their child while he is sleeping and forcibly take him to a wilderness program or residential treatment center.

These programs, many of which are based in Utah, sometimes send staff like Taylor to pick up the children. Parents can also hire a “safe transport” company whose sole purpose is to accompany teenagers to treatment centres.

This shadowy corner of the teen treatment industry is almost entirely unregulated. Carriers hired by parents can drag children from their beds, handcuff them, hold them or blindfold them. Oregon is the only state that has restricted how these companies can bring children across state lines.

In Utah, a lawmaker who recently sponsored a bill bringing regulatory reform to the state’s burgeoning teen treatment industry said he wanted to take a closer look at how children in people from all over the country travel to Utah for treatment.

Some former residents say the experience had traumatic effects that lingered into adulthood, long after leaving a treatment center.

Integrity House in Cedar City, Utah.

Integrity House in Cedar City, Utah.


Lea Hogsten | The Salt Lake Grandstand

A booming industry in Utah

There are over 100 accredited youth treatment programs in Utah. They are aimed at parents and outside agencies dealing with troubled adolescents.

Some are smaller group homes, tucked away in suburban neighborhoods like Integrity House, where Handel was sent. Others are vast horse ranches or large boarding schools. There are also wilderness therapy programs, which require teens to trek across Utah’s vast deserts and public lands.

Since 2015, some 20,000 children have been sent to adolescent treatment programs in Utah. The children come from wealthy families and foster families. Some are on juvenile probation. They may be struggling with drug abuse or eating disorders. Some are depressed or defiant. Some cut themselves or attempted suicide.

Teenagers contribute hundreds of millions of dollars to Utah’s economy each year, according to University of Utah estimates. And new data analysis from APM Reports, The Salt Lake Grandstand and KUER shows how outsized this industry is in Utah compared to other places.

For more than six years, from 2015 to 2020, 34% of teens who crossed state lines to enter a youth treatment center landed in Utah. This means that Utah receives many more children than any other state. On average, Utah receives nearly 3,000 children per year. Virginia and Texas — the next two most popular destinations where troubled teens are sent for treatment — receive between 1,200 and 1,300 children a year.


More children are placed in Utah than in any other state

Every year, thousands of children and adolescents cross state lines and are placed in treatment centers. Utah, which hosts nearly 3,000 placements a year, dominates the sector. The table below shows child placements in Utah and the 15 closest states. Unrepresented states conduct an average of less than 100 internships per year.

SOURCE: Interstate Child Care Compact (ICPC) data, 2015-2020, requested from each state. Not all states provided data for every year, and one state provided no data. The ICPC counts each time a child is placed in a treatment centre. A child could be placed in different treatment centers over the course of a year and would be counted each time they are placed in the care of a facility. To compare annual averages, APM reports normalized the number of placements using the number of years of data reported. DATA: Will make

Many of these children bound for Utah arrive through a “secure transportation” company, where parents pay thousands of dollars to have someone pick up their child and take them away.

At a St. George transportation company, parents pay nearly $2,500, plus airfare for two employees and their teenage boy, if needed.

Taylor, who helped run Integrity House for nearly a dozen years, often picked up residents. Whether or not the transport was a surprise, he said, often depended on the child’s parents. “Sometimes parents worry about not coming, or running away or whatever,” Taylor said in an interview with a reporter on the Sent Away podcast. “So they’ll keep it hidden until we show up.”

A vote for transport regulation

Stephanie Balderston will never forget when Taylor got her into the back seat of a car, taking her from her life in Colorado to Integrity House in 2008.

She still has nightmares, she said, waking up in the middle of the night crying after reliving that moment Taylor pulled her into a car as she screamed for help. Her parents were watching nearby, she recalls, crying but doing nothing to intervene.

“It really is like the most inhumane, craziest thing you’ve ever experienced in your life,” she said.

This memory also haunts Balderston during his waking hours. She sees men who look like Taylor in a store and she is seized with a wave of fear.

“Like at Costco or something, and you look up and you see a random person. And in my head, it’s him,” she said. “And I’m freezing. And I’m terrified. And I’m starting to have flashbacks of my transportation and being at Integrity House.

Last year, Utah State Senator Mike McKell sponsored legislation that marked the first reform of Utah’s troubled teen industry surveillance in 15 years.

The law placed limits on the use of restraints, drugs, and seclusion rooms in youth treatment programs. It required facilities to document any instances in which staff used physical restraints and seclusion, and it required them to submit reports to state licensors. It also increased the required number of inspections that state regulators must perform.

But that legislation placed no limits on what people who transport children to adolescent treatment programs can do — something McKell said he hopes to address in the future. “I don’t think the way we transport children is appropriate,” he said. “I’m convinced that if you start a treatment program with extreme trauma, common sense says it can’t be good for children. And I just think it should be completely banned.

Oregon’s limits on what carriers can do when bringing children into its state for treatment were only recently enacted, in 2021.

Utah <a class=State Senator Mike McKell” srcset=”https://img.apmcdn.org/90dc8976afaed9818db7c7294a73f45247c18555/uncropped/354271-20220302-utah-state-sen-mike-mckell-2000.jpg 2000w, https://img.apmcdn.org/90dc8976afaed9818db7c7294a73f45247c18555/uncropped/74e1a0-20220302-utah-state-sen-mike-mckell-1400.jpg 1400w, https://img.apmcdn.org/90dc8976afaed9818db7c7294a73f45247c18555/uncropped/512f56-20220302-utah-state-sen-mike-mckell-1000.jpg 1000w, https://img.apmcdn.org/90dc8976afaed9818db7c7294a73f45247c18555/uncropped/272284-20220302-utah-state-sen-mike-mckell-600.jpg 600w, https://img.apmcdn.org/90dc8976afaed9818db7c7294a73f45247c18555/uncropped/23ee2b-20220302-utah-state-sen-mike-mckell-400.jpg 400w” src=”https://img.apmcdn.org/90dc8976afaed9818db7c7294a73f45247c18555/uncropped/272284-20220302-utah-state-sen-mike-mckell-600.jpg”/>

Utah State Senator Mike McKell


Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Grandstand
Oregon State Senator Sara Gelser Blouin

Oregon State Senator Sara Gelser Blouin


Kaylee Domzalski | Oregon Public Broadcasting

This legislation, introduced by Oregon State Senator Sara Gelser Blouin, requires people who transport children to Oregon facilities to be registered with the state Department of Social Services. It also prohibits carriers from using mechanical restraints, such as handcuffs, when taking children to facilities.

“No more balaclavas, blindfolds or handcuffs,” Gelser Blouin said during a floor debate last June. “It is not children who have committed crimes. These are just children that parents have a hard time with. And some are in dire need of care or support, but not blindfolds, hoods, and handcuffs. »

McKell said he sees this as a problem that can only be solved by federal regulations. Since children move from state to state, he said, it is difficult to regulate conduct that occurs outside of Utah before a young person arrives for treatment. .

There has recently been a push to bring federal oversight to adolescent treatment programs nationwide, but the Collective Care Accountability Act has yet to be formally introduced or debated.

In the meantime, McKell said he wants to start understanding the scope of the transportation services industry in Utah. He sponsored a bill this session that will now require transportation companies to carry insurance and be licensed by the state — but he is not enacting any regulatory or oversight measures.

“There have been serious allegations of abuse in the past,” McKell said. “I am concerned about children being picked up in the middle of the night and the trauma that creates.”

Sent Away is an investigative podcast from APM Reports, KUER and The Salt Lake Grandstand. The report is funded in part by Arnold Ventures, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Hollyhock Foundation. See more collaborative reports.

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Salt lake city government

Key pandemic nutrition assistance looks set to end suddenly

The spat has been taking place behind the scenes in recent weeks as lawmakers try to cobble together a deal to avoid a federal shutdown, which is expected to happen after midnight Friday unless Congress acts. The difficult process has sparked a series of tough debates about which programs passed earlier in the pandemic — and how much, if any, they should be funded more.

The Biden administration had urged lawmakers to expand an initiative first enacted in 2020 that gave the Department of Agriculture the power to issue nutritional waivers for children nationwide. These waivers have allowed school nutrition programs, local government agencies and nonprofits to continue feeding children despite numerous challenges, including school closures that have forced students to learn remotely.

But the Biden administration’s request — backed by congressional Democrats — met resistance on Capitol Hill, according to four sources familiar with the matter, who spoke on condition of anonymity to describe the private discussions. Among the Republican opponents was Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, the sources said.

One of the sources, an aide to the Senate Republican leadership, explained that the program was designed as a temporary solution – and its extension would have cost more than $11 billion at a time when the party is worried about the increasing deficits. The aide pointed out that schools are reopening anyway and faulted the Biden administration for not extending school lunch programs as part of the roughly $1.9 trillion stimulus package Democrats have supported last year. The administration also did not include any money for the initiative when it asked Congress to approve more than $20 billion in new coronavirus emergency funding last week.

Multiple sources have warned that talks around a bipartisan funding deal remain unresolved, meaning the discussion could still change. Lawmakers aim to finalize work on the bill as early as Tuesday so the House and Senate can vote on the broader spending package imminently.

However, without an extension of waivers, schools are expected to see a dramatic reduction in reimbursements for school meals over the next school year. USDA estimates more than 40% decline in school lunch funding for an average school district. The average reimbursement a school gets for a meal served will drop from $4.56 to about $2.91. And it will happen as schools continue to face higher costs for food, labor and supplies.

Schools could also lose critical flexibility in their operation, which has allowed them to adapt the rules of traditional curricula to deal with the pandemic and labor shortages, advocates of those programs say. This includes flexibilities to provide in-class meals or take-out meals for children who have to miss school during quarantines.

Schools could lose the ability to substitute food for needs when they can’t get what they ordered due to unexpected supply chain disruptions, advocates say. Finally, without waivers, schools could face financial penalties if they fail to meet federal requirements due to supply chain issues, and through no fault of their own. For example, if they can’t serve a variety of vegetables or get whole-grain-rich products that meet federal standards, states will be required to penalize districts.

“Ninety percent of schools use waivers and only 75 percent of them break even,” said Stacy Dean, USDA Deputy Undersecretary. “If your income is too low for your costs, you either have to go elsewhere for your income or cut your costs, which could mean lower quality food, layoffs or cutback programs like snacks and breakfast. after school, which has a particular impact on low-income students.

School nutrition advocates are angry. Although covid cases have declined and unemployment in this country continues to fall, the loss of these waivers will be cataclysmic for needy schools and students in a situation that continues to be far from normal, said Kelly Orton , principal of the Salt Lake City School District. . He points out the shortcomings he sees at the moment.

“We had problems getting milk. The carton makers couldn’t make them for us, and sporadically we didn’t have drivers to transport the milk,” he said. “We haven’t had any milk since last Tuesday. It hasn’t been delivered all week, and it’s a vital item that we’re supposed to supply. It’s the new normal.”

Additionally, school districts across the country are struggling to find enough workers, Orton said, but increased funding during the pandemic has allowed districts to pay higher wages to compete in a tight job market.

“At the Utah chain stores, the new starting salary is $15. We had paid $13.50 in our plan, and we just got $15 approved in February so we could be competitive. current funding has allowed us to do that. The fear is that when those waivers go away and the money goes away, there’s no way to fund those higher salaries,” he said.

Many pandemic-era safety net programs have a gradual return to normal, the USDA’s Dean said. By removing these waivers on June 30, schools will not have enough funds for summer programs and for the next school year. Dean said other safety net programs that have been bolstered by the pandemic during the crisis, such as Medicaid health insurance and SNAP (the supplemental nutrition program formerly called food stamps), have had more time to come back. to tighter funding.

“We are concerned that a hard pivot on June 30 could jeopardize a smooth return to normal. What we want is an exit ramp to give schools time to get back to business as usual,” Dean said.

Losing those waivers also means significant logistical challenges for school administrators as they have to charge students again and track eligibility, said Katie Wilson, executive director of the nonprofit Urban School Food Alliance. profit created by school catering professionals.

“Families haven’t filled out free and reduced-price meal forms for the past two years. It will literally be impossible to get that information before the end of June,” Wilson said. “It will take a lot of communication and education to get families to understand why this is changing while they are still under the water of the pandemic. School nutrition programs are taking over all of this, and it will only get worse when they have to find a way to charge parents again.

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Salt lake city

Whitney claims Lisa spread rumors about Meredith before rant

The ladies of “The Real Housewives of Salt Lake City” shared their thoughts on Lisa Barlow’s hot mic tirade against ex-best friend Meredith Marks on Sunday night’s second installment of Season 2 reunion.

While chatting with host Andy Cohen, Whitney Rose claimed Barlow, 47, called Marks, 50, a ‘whore’ who ‘fucked half of New York’ long before the angry rant was filmed.

“Since I’m a pot-stirrer – if the shoe fits you, wear it – she told people before she even filmed exactly that,” Rose, 35, said.

“I’m sure she did,” an exasperated Marks replied.

Meanwhile, Barlow has vehemently denied Rose’s accusation.

“I didn’t, I didn’t, I didn’t!” exclaimed the CEO of Vida Tequila before addressing Marks directly. “I never spoke of your marriage. I never talked about you before this rant and I’m sorry it was audio taped.

A separation of Lisa Barlow and Whitney Rose at the "The Real Housewives of Salt Lake City" Season 2 reunions
Whitney Rose claimed during the ‘Real Housewives of Salt Lake City‘ Season 2 reunion that Lisa Barlow spread rumors about Meredith Marks before her hot mic outburst.
Courtesy of Bravo

In her rant, Barlow not only called the jewelry designer a “bitch,” but also claimed she cheated on husband Seth Marks. Barlow’s harsh remarks about Meredith came after a controversial group dinner, during which Meredith’s friendships with Barlow and Mary Cosby, 49, were compared.

“Fake Meredith is a piece of shit…fuck you! This fucking piece of fucking garbage. I f-king hate her,” spat Barlow, who felt that Meredith had shown more loyalty to Cosby, a friend of far fewer years. “[Meredith’s] a whore.

At the reunion, Meredith said she was appalled by Barlow’s outburst.

“The venom and hatred that accompanied the delivery is what resonated. I couldn’t even sit down and watch it. I would stop it,” she said. “It took me about an hour to get through it. I was sick, completely sick.

Barlow, who admitted she was in a “blind rage” during the rant, clarified that she didn’t believe Meredith had “f—ked half of New York.”

Meredith Marks at "The Real Housewives of Salt Lake City" Season 2 reunions
Marks said she was appalled by the “venom” in Barlow’s rant, which also included allegations of marital infidelity.

“Do I think you fucked 4.2 million people? No,” Barlow said, to which Meredith jokingly replied, “I slept with fewer people than I have fingers, okay? So this is it. New York City is quite large.

Barlow repeatedly apologized to Meredith throughout the latest “RHOSLC” reunion episode, but it was his last apology that stood out the most.

“I’m beyond sorry,” Barlow began, also acknowledging that his verbal attack hurt Meredith’s husband and their adult children, Reed, Chloe and Brooks.

Seemingly in an attempt to justify his words, Barlow added: “Someone had just told me that you didn’t care about my renovation and stuff and I was like upset…You said I live in a house like —tty.”

Lisa Barlow on the "The Real Housewives of Salt Lake City" Season 2 reunions
Barlow denied ever speaking ill of Meredith and Seth Marks’ marriage before his rant was captured by Bravo cameras.
Courtesy of Bravo

A confused Meredith insisted she ‘didn’t speak’ about Barlow’s house in any capacity, but was nonetheless miffed that the alleged insult prompted such hateful comments from Barlow .

“OK, you have an ugly house, so you should rip my character to shreds,” said Meredith, who left the reunion couch to get away from Barlow during a break from filming. “OK. gorgeous.”

Part 3 of “The Real Housewives of Salt Lake City” Season 2 reunion airs Sunday, March 13 at 9 p.m. ET on Bravo.

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Utah economy

Utah Governor Spencer Cox says he plans to veto trans sports ban bill

SALT LAKE CITY, AP — Utah Gov. Spencer Cox said he plans to veto legislation passed Friday that would ban transgender female student-athletes from participating in women’s sports.

Without her support, Utah is unlikely to join the 11 states, all led by Republicans, that recently banned transgender girls from participating in school sports leagues that match their gender identity.

In vowing to veto the bill, Cox directly addressed transgender student-athletes, who he says have been the subject of political debate through no fault of their own.

“I just want them to know that everything will be fine. We’re going to work through that,” Cox said.

The governor had engaged for months in behind-the-scenes negotiations to broker a compromise between LGBTQ advocates and social conservatives.

After lending his support to a proposal to create a one-of-a-kind Utah commission of experts to make decisions about individual transgender student-athletes wishing to participate, Cox said he was stunned on Friday night so that lawmakers moved forward and eventually passed a modified proposal that included an outright ban on transgender female student-athletes competing in girls’ leagues.

Legislation sent to Cox after passing the state Senate and House on Friday bans “biological males” — which she defines as “the genetics and anatomy of an individual at birth” — from leagues some girls. Supporters said it would ensure fairness and safety for girls and prevent cultural shifts that they believe could lead to increasing numbers of transgender children wanting to participate in women’s sports in the future.

“Boys can run faster, they can jump higher, and they can throw farther than girls in the same age bracket,” Republican Senator Curt Bramble said.

“For male-born individuals to compete with naturally-born females, it’s an unfair playing field,” he added.

The originally proposed “School Activities Eligibility Commission” would have been made up of a mix of sports and transgender healthcare experts. It ultimately failed to gain buy-in from those who oppose and support a ban.

Utah Governor Spencer Cox speaks during a press conference at the Utah State Capitol, Friday, Feb. 18, 2022, in Salt Lake City.

Rick Bowmer via Associated Press

Although they preferred it to an outright ban, LGBTQ advocates worried that transgender children scheduled to appear before the panel would feel singled out. Social conservatives, backed by a much larger contingent of Republican lawmakers, said that didn’t go far enough to protect women’s sports.

There are no public accusations that a transgender player has competitive advantages in Utah. Last year, The Associated Press contacted two dozen lawmakers in more than 20 states considering similar youth sports measures and found that it was only a problem a few times among the hundreds of thousands of teenagers. who play sports in high school.

The legislation sent to the governor aims to refute what the commission’s advocates, including the bill’s sponsor, Rep. Kera Birkeland, thought were among their strongest arguments: that the courts would likely prevent Utah from enforcing a ban, much like they have in states like Idaho.

The ban that eventually passed retained sections of the original proposal and named the commission as a replacement, for a scenario in which the courts prohibited Utah from enforcing a ban.

Birkeland, who coaches high school basketball when she’s not in the Legislative Assembly, said her plans to introduce a sports bill for transgender youth for the second year in a row ties into the conversations she had had with transgender and cisgender students.

Although Utah lawmakers ultimately ended up in the same place, Birkeland’s comments were very different from those of lawmakers in states such as Iowa, where a senator framed a ban as a stance against “revival and part of an “ongoing culture war.”

Birkeland said she was frustrated with the many conversations she had about the politics of her commission proposal, rather than the children involved.

She expects she will face legal challenges, but ultimately backed the amended legislation because she says if the ban is imposed by the courts, the commission will eventually operate as intended.

Equality Utah, an LGBTQ rights group opposed to state intervention in youth sports, said it was blindsided by the passage of the legislation.

“We let down our state’s transgender children, who just want to be treated with kindness and respect,” the group said in a statement.

In most places, eligibility decisions for transgender children are made by athletic organizations like the Utah High School Athletic Association. Of the approximately 85,000 student-athletes who play high school sports in the state, four transgender players have gone through the association’s eligibility determination process.

Despite these established processes, youth sports have increasingly become a central political issue in Republican-majority state houses. Prior to 2020, no state had enacted legislation relating to transgender children participating in youth sports. Since then, 11 states have passed laws banning transgender girls from playing in leagues that match their gender identity – Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Idaho, Iowa, Mississippi, Montana, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia.

In Indiana, lawmakers passed a ban this week, sending it to Governor Eric Holcomb for final approval.

The nature of the prohibitions varies. Some explicitly target transgender girls, which have been the main topic of debate in most state houses. Others are broad enough to include college athletics.

With two-thirds majorities in both houses, lawmakers could override the governor’s veto, but with some Republicans opposed to the ban, such a scenario is unlikely.

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Salt lake city

Should the streets of Salt Lake have a 20 mph speed limit? The city is studying a “bold” plan

A “20 Is Plenty” lawn sign designed by the Sweet Streets group. The group handed out lawn signs at an event on May 26, 2021. Salt Lake City’s transportation division was given the go-ahead to seek a speed limit change at a meeting on Tuesday. (Jed Boal, KSL-TV)

Estimated reading time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — The default street speed in Salt Lake City neighborhoods is about to be reduced.

The Salt Lake City Council, through a unanimous poll, gave its transportation division the go-ahead to pursue a proposal to lower the city’s default speed limit from 25 mph to 20 mph. If approved in the future, it would apply to all streets in the city, unless otherwise specified.

But even transportation experts who support the idea say lowering the speed limit will likely require future investment to reshape streets.

“(A 20mph speed limit) would be a bold statement, but what would really make a difference…is to back that up with long-term changes in street design,” said Jon Larsen, divisional director of Salt Lake City transportation.

Council’s decision to ask the division to investigate the matter further came after three members of the nonprofit Sweet Streets gave a presentation on the benefits of lowering the city’s default speed limit in 5 mph during the council business meeting on Thursday.

The volunteer organization began promoting a “20 is Plenty” initiative last year with the goal of reducing vehicle speeds in Salt Lake City‘s residential neighborhoods. Taylor Anderson, co-founder of the group, told the council that safety is the top priority, which is why 20mph has been generally used in other parts of the world.

When a vehicle reduces its speed from 30 mph to 20 mph, the chance of a person hit by a vehicle on a street surviving increases from 60% to 90%, according to the Utah Department of Transportation. And these are just dead. Anderson said people’s lives can be “permanently impaired” even if they survive these types of crashes.

“It’s so important to get those speeds closer to 20 mph. … There are significant safety impacts immediately without redesigning the street just by changing the posted speed,” he said during the presentation.

Since road safety is often years behind schedule, organization began tracking ‘traffic violence’ in Salt Lake City as of the end of 2020. This is a database of different automotive-related incidents reported by the media, such as times when people were hit by cars and speeding-related accidents.


We are asking for a paradigm shift. The way we set speeds in the city right now puts the speed of cars first, rather than the safety of people interacting with the street.

–Taylor Anderson, co-founder of Sweet Streets


They have found more than a dozen dead in the city and a handful more injured since December 2020 – and that’s only according to local media reports. The total number of injuries is likely much higher.

Overall, Anderson said people of color, children, the elderly and vulnerable populations are disproportionately affected. He concluded his presentation by asking council to think about people more than the speed of cars when setting streets and speed limits.

“We are asking for a paradigm shift,” he said. “The way we set speeds in the city at the moment, it prioritizes the speed of cars, rather than the safety of people interacting with the street. By making this change, you have the opportunity to change that .”

It should be noted that the city has started reducing speed on some streets to 20 mph. These include parts of West Temple and 1300 South. Other streets, like 400 southwest of I-15 and 900 west, may also soon be added to the list.

The default limit is not universal, however, which Sweet Streets claims.

“There’s a kind of 1900s politics that we’re slowly moving away from as an industry,” Larsen said. “We don’t try to do everything at once, but just assess where appropriate.”

While supportive of the concept his division is already considering, Larsen doesn’t think a lower speed limit alone will make much of a difference. He sees the speed limit as a “symbolic” measure and less as an incentive for drivers to slow down.

However, he said it could be a good conversation starter for other tactics to make streets safer in neighborhoods, including finding ways to disrupt street design that is more “human-centric.” “as they were before motor vehicles. Once the streets are different enough, he said drivers will be encouraged to drive slower.

Anderson agrees. He thinks that street design, such as street width, lanes and speed bumps, all contribute to influencing driving speeds more than speed limits, but a reduction in limits defines at least an expectation. The organization even held a march last week, which ended with the delivery of a petition to Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall calling for an overhaul of 200 South to include bus-only lanes.

Regarding the 20mph proposal, some council members said there needed to be community buy-in and awareness for any changes. For example, Councilwoman Victoria Petro-Eschler expressed concern that people may end up getting more speeding tickets because they are unaware of a new speed limit.

The idea also has the “full support” of members like Councilor Ana Valdemoros.

“I have too many constituents telling me tragic stories and how they would benefit,” she said.

No deadline has been set for the Transportation Division to investigate the matter. If the division recommends a change, the board will have the final say before it is implemented.

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Utah economy

Many Utah consumers are confident in their finances, despite inflation

SALT LAKE CITY — Consumers in Utah say they have hope for the economy and their finances, even with rising inflation. And Utahns tend to feel this in greater numbers than Americans in other states.

The Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute tracks consumer sentiment in Utah. They noted this surge in confidence in a survey they conducted between January and February 2022.

The Institute reported that consumer sentiment rose 1.9 points from January to February 2022 to land at 78.8%. Sentiment rose among college students and households earning less than $100,000 a year. It fell for those without a degree and those earning over $100,000 a year.

“We really see the benefits of Utah’s strong economy,” said the Institute’s senior economist Joshua Splosdoff, “and good politics in the lives of its citizens.”

That’s not to say Utah consumers are back to where they felt before the global pandemic hit in 2020.

“Overall, we feel even worse than before the pandemic, so we still have a long way to go,” he said.

And Utahans who earn more than $100,000 a year felt less optimistic than those who earned less. Spolsdoff thinks it’s because households with higher incomes have more assets and more to lose.

The result of the Institute’s latest consumer confidence survey comes as no surprise. Spolsdoff said Utah has always been above the national average.

“We’ve actually had ‘net positive’ job growth for the past two years, while most states have had ‘net negative’ growth. As the nation recovered, we were basically expanding and thriving.

And while the survey notes that Utahans are feeling positive, it was conducted before Russia invaded Ukraine and doesn’t take into account the effects the invasion could have on Ukraine’s economy. Utah or Utahans in general.

Another reading:

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Salt lake city government

Utah to remove body measurements from transgender sports bill | News, Sports, Jobs


Rep. Kera Birkeland, R-Morgan, stands for a portrait at the Utah State Capitol Wednesday, March 2, 2022 in Salt Lake City. Birkeland, a Republican who coaches junior college basketball when she’s not in the state house, said Wednesday she was removing a list of physical attributes from her proposed “Commission eligibility for school activities” – which reportedly used listed criteria such as bone density, hip-to-knee ratio and oxygen saturation to determine eligibility (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

SALT LAKE CITY, AP — Transgender children would not be required to report certain body measurements to play sports in Utah, but their participation would still depend on a government-appointed panel of experts under a proposal passing through the Republican-controlled legislature.

Rep. Kera Birkeland, a Republican who coaches junior college basketball, said Wednesday she was removing a list of physical attributes from her proposed “School Activities Eligibility Commission,” which would have used criteria such as bone density, hip-to-knee ratio and oxygen saturation to determine eligibility.

The list of physical attributes has caused an outcry from parents of transgender children and LGBTQ advocates, who fear student-athletes may feel controlled and targeted by the commission.

“We are still working on some details. We just want to make sure it’s legally tightened and we address as many concerns as possible,” Birkeland said, adding that she expected the changes to be introduced within a day or two.

The most recent version of the bill would leave the eligibility criteria to the commission. Birkeland said he could still consider the attributes originally included in the bill, but would have more flexibility to tailor decision-making to individual sports, for example, using different criteria for golf versus basketball. ball.

“They will always consider anything that can give them an athletic edge. They can go back and look at these things and consider the hip-knee ratio. They may consider that muscle mass or size… We don’t want to corner them and say, ‘Just consider those things,’” she said.

Troy Williams, executive director of Equality Utah, said LGBTQ advocates expected changes to be introduced, but did not know the extent.

The revision came as GOP-majority legislatures throughout the U.S. debate banned transgender student-athletes from playing youth sports. At least 10 states have banned transgender student-athletes from school sports.

Birkeland proposes creating a one-of-a-kind commission for Utah that transgender children would be required to go through if they want to compete in leagues that match their gender identity, rather than the sex listed on their birth certificates. .

Birkeland, who led last year’s unsuccessful campaign to ban transgender student-athletes from women’s sports in Utah, said the commission balanced two legitimate competing priorities: ensuring that transgender children don’t feel not ostracized and protect fairness in women’s sports.

She framed her proposal as a compromise that would allow transgender athletes to play, while addressing Conservative concerns that such players might have a competitive advantage in women’s sports. She hopes that, if passed, the commission will not be challenged by lawsuits like bans in other states like Idaho.

Of the 85,000 students who play high school sports in the state, four have gone through the Utah High School Activities Association’s transgender participation eligibility review process, the association announced Tuesday. Birkeland said he heard of or observed at least eight other contestants.

While the number of athletes involved is central to the issue under consideration, she declined to justify that number, out of concern for student-athletes who may not wish to have their gender identity widely publicized.

Last year, The Associated Press contacted two dozen lawmakers in more than 20 states considering similar measures and found they could cite a few cases where transgender athletes playing high school sports were causing trouble.

There are no public accusations that a transgender player has competitive advantages in Utah.

LGBTQ advocates and parents of transgender student-athletes have balked at the idea that a panel would “police” the measures of transgender student-athletes — an idea Birkeland said his proposal would not require.

Birkeland said transgender student-athletes could submit any information they wanted to the proposed commission. But if they decide not to submit relevant data points, they may be asked additional questions about the criteria as members determine whether they can compete fairly.

Williams, the executive director of Equality Utah, said he wasn’t sure whether LGBTQ advocates would support the bill once the changes are made public.

Removing the list of physical attributes from the bill, he said, would make the backgrounds of commission members more important.

The commission would include a coach, a representative of a sports association and an athletic trainer, in addition to doctors, statisticians and mental health professionals.

Williams believes it will be biased against young transgender people because at least half of its members would not be transgender health experts, he said.

“It does not strive to find a meaningful balance between the values ​​of competition and the values ​​of participation and is geared more towards sports experts, as opposed to people who have expertise in transgender health care,” said said Williams.

South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem this month signed into law a ban on transgender girls playing women’s sports at the youth and college levels, and Indiana lawmakers passed a bill on Tuesday. ban, sending it to Governor Eric Holcomb for approval.

States that have passed bans have not faced boycotts like North Carolina did when the NCAA and NBA moved events in response to the passage of a 2016 state law. limiting public restrooms that transgender people could use.

But Birkeland’s proposed ban stalled last year amid concerns from Republican Gov. Spencer Cox, who feared passing a ban would jeopardize efforts to hold big events in Utah.

Birkeland’s proposal must be finalized this week because the Utah legislature is scheduled to adjourn Friday.



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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City mother grapples with unexpected rent hike

SALT LAKE CITY – Finding housing in Salt Lake City is hard enough, whether residents are buying or renting. But a woman is speaking out after learning her rent will go up by around $500 next month.

There is currently a 2% vacancy rate in the city, but in a healthy market that number should be closer to 5%.

“I don’t know how anyone can afford it. And then having to try to move, to find something different, where else am I going to go,” said the single mother, who wished to remain anonymous for fear of reprisals.

The woman who lives on the west side of town said she had lived in her apartment for two years and was ready for a rent increase, but was shocked at how much it had gone up.

“It’s way more than 12%, which is pretty normal, but it’s way closer to 50%,” the woman said.

Before the increase, she said she was paying about $959 a month, but now she will pay more than $1,400.

“I will try to work 60 hours a week. The girls there, they felt bad, they felt bad…they said there was nothing we could do, everyone was feeling it, I didn’t expect to feel it so bad,” he said. she declared.

A notice from the apartment complex claims that the prices are increasing every day.

“It’s cheaper for me, it says here, to be here for six months, they want me out because they want to renovate it so they can charge more,” the woman added.

And with virtually no vacancies, someone would fill their position at the complex almost immediately.

“Probably 5-10 people in their office have lined up wanting a space, so they’re feeling this outside pressure from people who want these units and so to get things done, they’re passing on the cost,” Dejan Eskic said.

Eskic, who specializes in housing and real estate research, said while house prices took off at the start of the pandemic, rents have remained fairly stable. But in 2021, rents started to catch up.

“It’s uncharted territory in terms of rent growth, but at the same time when we look at the demographics, the demand and the lack of supply, it makes sense,” Eskic said.

Lack of manpower, lack of lumber, lack of inventory are all contributing factors and will certainly not have an overnight solution.

Eskic said if you can, become an advocate for more housing in your community.

“Another thing that’s holding us back is us, when we see more housing on offer, we tend to oppose it,” Eskic said. “Some of our stereotypes and misconceptions about density just aren’t true, they’re leftovers from the bad government projects of the 70s and 80s, and that’s really changed in the last 10 to 15 years.

FOX 13 News has contacted the apartment complex where the rent increases are scheduled. The employees wouldn’t comment on camera, but said what they were doing was completely legal and was just in response to current market conditions.

Eskic said nationally about 16% of renters are behind on rent, but in Utah that number is closer to just 6%.

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Salt lake city government

Utah’s bill banning vaccine passports passed committee after tense meeting

Utah Highway Patrol soldiers take a man into custody for breaking committee meeting rules by failing to cover a political shirt, before discussion of vaccine passport changes began at a meeting of the committee at the State Capitol on Tuesday. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

Estimated reading time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — After a tense meeting that began with some community members being kicked out by soldiers, the Utah Senate introduced a bill that will ban businesses and the government from demanding vaccine passports to enter.

HB60 brought dozens of them to the Senate Tax and Revenue Committee meeting on Tuesday days before the end of the session.

The bill as originally drafted would also have prohibited companies from requiring vaccines. After a heated debate, the committee eventually approved by a 7-2 vote a new version of the bill that still allows employers to require “proof of immunity status”, which can include a previous infection if they have a doctor’s note.

The bill awaits full Senate approval — as well as House approval of amendments — before it can become final.

At the start of the meeting, committee chairman Senator Dan McCay, R-Riverton, warned the crowd that they should abide by the Legislative Assembly’s decorum rules, which he said prohibit attendees getting angry, wearing political stickers, or carrying flags or signs during meetings.

“There are, just like there are everywhere you go, there are rules that you follow in society. Some of them just aren’t a fool, are they? And that rule unfortunately seems to be violated more frequently than not on Capitol Hill,” McCay said.

He said those in the room were breaking the rules, which led him to interrupt the committee for five minutes to give attendees a chance to “follow these rules”.

Sen. Mike Kennedy, R-Alpine, offers his coat to a man as Utah Highway Patrol soldiers demand the man leave for breaking committee meeting rules by failing to cover a shirt politics, before discussion of the HB60S02 vaccine passport changes begins during a meeting of the Senate Standing Committee on Revenue and Taxation in the Senate Building in Salt <a class=Lake City on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The man declined Kennedy’s offer. The man also previously displayed political stickers but put them away when asked.”/>
Sen. Mike Kennedy, R-Alpine, offers his coat to a man as Utah Highway Patrol soldiers demand the man leave for breaking committee meeting rules by failing to cover a shirt politics, before discussion of the HB60S02 vaccine passport changes begins during a meeting of the Senate Standing Committee on Revenue and Taxation in the Senate Building in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. The man declined Kennedy’s offer. The man also previously displayed political stickers but put them away when asked. (Photo: Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

During this break, people started shouting in the room. Soldiers escorted away a few people, including a man who had removed political stickers but refused to cover a t-shirt that read “We the people”.

When the bill’s sponsor, Rep. Walt Brooks, R-St. George, began his presentation, he began by attempting to comment on the no sticker or sign rule, and that he is “deeply disappointed”.

“Representative, don’t test the President’s mettle,” McCay shot back. “Please keep your comments relevant to the bill.”

Brooks said the bill was intended to prohibit discrimination against someone because of their vaccination or medical status.

“I think it’s important to note that when we come up with legislation, especially something about this, that it’s not a COVID bill, but COVID has definitely brought it out to because of what many consider an overshoot,” Brooks said. .

He described government leaders as “going overboard” in urging people during the pandemic not to celebrate Christmas with more than 10 people at home.

“What this bill really does is go back to the way we did business before COVID,” he said.

McCay argued that forcing someone to allow someone onto his property is “really uncomfortable” for him, calling it “dangerous territory”.

But Brooks likened the bill to the civil rights movement, saying, “We know that people are created equal.”

He said the unvaccinated should be a protected class.

Representative Walt Brooks, R-St.  George, holds up what he says is a list of 4,000 CEOs and owner-operators who support the HB60S02 vaccine passport changes during a meeting of the Senate Standing Committee on Revenue and Taxation in the Senate building in Salt <a class=Lake City on Tuesday, March 1, 2022.”/>
Representative Walt Brooks, R-St. George, holds up what he says is a list of 4,000 CEOs and owner-operators who support the HB60S02 vaccine passport changes during a meeting of the Senate Standing Committee on Revenue and Taxation in the Senate building in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, March 1, 2022. (Photo: Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

But McCay said an unvaccinated person still has a choice of which businesses they visit.

That’s not the case for some small towns, Brooks said, explaining that a town like Blanding only has two grocery stores.

During a lengthy public comment session, some people, mostly from the business community, spoke out against the bill, but the majority of commentators supported the bill.

Elizabeth Converse, with Utah Tech Leads, called the bill “anti-business” and said that as it is currently written, it would also affect other vaccines, causing problems.

Karen Zaya, who described herself as a nurse, said she was considered high risk due to her medical history, but she supports the bill.

“Nobody has the right to ask me what my medical history is. That’s exactly what a passport is,” she said, adding that it makes her “vulnerable to discrimination.”

Mark Alston, one of the owners of the Bayou – among the only businesses in Utah to require proof of vaccine from customers to enter – claimed food service workers were the source of hundreds of disease outbreaks of food origin in the country. He expressed concern about what the bill could do to the restaurant industry.

“I am a living woman who reserves my rights before God,” said Heather Vanin, explaining that vaccine passports allow people to be “withheld” from services based on their health status.

She said that as a mother she had seen “a lot of things cured” without vaccines.

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Salt lake city

Here are the 14 Salt Lake City schools proposed for possible boundary changes or closures

The proposed list is on the agenda for the Tuesday school board meeting.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Mr. Lynn Bennion Elementary School in Salt Lake City is featured in 2019, when it was proposed for closure. School board members decided to keep the school open, but it is now on a proposed new study list of schools that might be considered for boundaries or closure.

In the face of declining enrollment that accelerated in the fall of 2020, Salt Lake City School Board members began the process of evaluating schools for potential boundary changes or closures.

Council members asked Superintendent Timothy Gadson to develop a study list earlier this month, after hearing that the expected continued decline in enrollment next year would support 76.5 fewer teaching positions, according to its school staffing formula. The council voted to cut 42 jobs instead, which district officials expect to be able to do through retirements and attrition, without layoffs.

Tuesday’s board meeting agenda includes a proposed study list in Gadson by Paul Schulte, Executive Director of District Auxiliary Services, Feb. 17. He suggests rating 14 elementary schools into five groups, based on building age, enrollment, usage, and proximity to other schools. Franklin Elementary School is the only school listed in multiple groups.

(The original list released by the district incorrectly included Wasatch Elementary twice and omitted Washington Elementary. This story has been updated to reflect and link to the corrected list.)

(Christopher Cherrington | The Salt Lake Tribune)

Schulte’s list will be presented for further questions and advice from council members on Tuesday, district spokesman Yándary Chatwin said.

Under district procedures for boundary changes and school closuresGadson was expected to gather information to present to the board by the end of February.

The next step outlined in the procedure is for the board to approve an official study list, and then from March through May, district staff would meet with representatives from each school. From May to June, an options committee – convened by Gadson – would develop a list of suggestions he considers viable, for presentation to the board in July.

The Gadson-appointed options committee may create a different list than Schulte’s proposal, Chatwin noted.

School board members are not expected to comment on Schulte’s list at their Tuesday meeting, Chatwin said. Her suggestion to assess schools in clusters allows the board to consider the impact closing one school would have on others around it, she added.

Some schools on Schulte’s list offer unique options that may need to migrate elsewhere if closed. For example, Franklin and Emerson Elementary Schools offer special education programs. Mary W. Jackson, Emerson, and Hawthorne Elementary Schools offer dual-immersion Spanish learning. Emerson’s program is also part of the district’s gifted classes, known as the Extended Learning Program, and Hawthorne is also a loving ELP school.

Several of the schools on the proposed new list were evaluated in 2019 by a committee of district employees and parents. The group suggested the closure of Mr. Lynn Bennion Elementary, located near downtown at 429 S. 800 East.

Although the school board did not close Bennion at this time, his enrollment continued to decline, and he is on the proposed new list of studies.

Bennion and six other schools on the proposed new list were identified as “underutilized” in the 2019 review, meaning they can accommodate an additional 250 or more students. These schools are Ensign, Franklin, Nibley Park, Parkview, Riley, and Washington.

Bennion, Edison and Riley are the three Salt Lake City elementary schools on the proposed list where all students come from low-income families. (There are five such elementary schools in the district, including Liberty and Meadowlark, according to the district. 2021 Enrollment Report.)

Bennion parents, teachers and students opposed the suggested closure at an emotional meeting in February 2019. They told the council that more than a quarter of Bennion students were homeless and that at least 30 children lived in the nearby women’s shelter for victims of domestic violence. a few blocks. Nearly 65% ​​of the students belonged to minorities.

As a Title I school, Bennion receives additional federal funding due to its proportion of low-income families—one of several such schools on the proposed new list.

(Christopher Cherrington | The Salt Lake Tribune)

Resources

• District neighborhood maps and the school board member from each constituency.

• The neighborhood procedures for reviewing boundary changes and school closures.

• The District’s Fall 2021 Enrollment Report. The numbers for each school are usually slightly lower than the numbers used in a more recent budget report to the blackboard.

• The 2019 Fair Use of Buildings report.

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Salt lake city government

Meredith Marks says her lawyer has a snowflake necklace gifted by Jen Shah

The Real Housewives of Salt Lake City Star Meredith Marks accepted a snowflake necklace as a gift from Jen Shah despite claiming she didn’t feel comfortable attending a dinner party if her co-star paid for it. Marks spoke about it recently, insisting that his lawyer is currently in possession of the gift.

‘RHOSLC’ Cast Members Whitney Rose, Meredith Marks, Jen Shah and Lisa Barlow | Fred Hayes/Bravo/NBCU Photo Bank/Getty Images

‘RHOSLC’ star Meredith Marks says her lawyer has custody of Jen Shah’s snowflake necklace

During a January 2022 episode of Watch What Happens Live with Andy CohenMeredith Marks answered a fan question that questioned why she accepted a gift from Jen Shah when she was worried about attending a dinner party potentially paid for by her co-star.

The jewelry designer called the situation a “big deal” for her and said the gift “surprised” her. “Extremely concerned” about what to do, Marks said she called a lawyer immediately after returning from the trip and handed it over to him.

RELATED: ‘RHOSLC’: Meredith Marks Addresses ‘Lies’ in Lisa Barlow’s Hot Mic ‘Tirade’: ‘Maybe It Projects’

According to the Chicago native, if Shah is found guilty of her pending charges, her lawyer will give the necklace to the government for restitution.

However, if her co-star is innocent, Marks noted that she would then reevaluate their friendship and if she was moved to a place where she would feel comfortable accepting the gift.

Marks previously said she wanted nothing to do with Shah

After The Real Housewives of Salt Lake City Season 1 ended, Marks got mad at Shah for liking derogatory tweets about his son, Brooks Marks. She ended up meeting with the fashion designer to apologize.

It seemed just as well until Shah was arrested for conspiracy to commit wire fraud and telemarketing money laundering. Following news of the indictment, Marks noted that she couldn’t be the friend Shah needed right now and asked others not to invite them both to the same events.

Either way, they kept doing it, and Marks attended a Mother’s Day holiday weekend, paid for by the husbands, alongside Shah. Ahead of her planned Cinco De Mayo-themed dinner, the famous jewelry designer privately told Whitney Rose that she didn’t feel comfortable attending if Shah paid for it.

She went anyway and Shah gave the ladies a snowflake necklace as a gift. Chosen several weeks ago when she and her former assistant, now co-defendant Stuart Smith, went shopping for the perfect gift for the group, and they decided to do it because each snowflake is unique. Many fans noticed that Marks accepted the jewelry despite his initial apprehensions about attending the dinner.

A few ‘RHOSLC’ castmates wondered if Marks had anything to do with Shah’s arrest

When Shah was first arrested, Mary Cosby and Marks were not in the van as they decided to meet the ladies in Zion.

After Lisa Barlow told the ladies about a conversation she had with Cosby in which the pastor claimed they would go to jail if they ‘dirty’ his church, Rose and Heather Gay wondered if the two had something something to do with Shah’s indictment.

The line of questions ranged from who informed the FBI of their location to Marks who may have lied about attending his father’s memorial to help the police catch Shah. The Chicago native took offense to the speculation, which led her to lash out at the ladies early in the morning.

Plus, all the confusion took a toll on Marks and Barlow’s longtime friendship, especially as it resulted in a memorable hot mic rant that could affect their relationship for good. Part 1 of the RHOSLC The season 2 finale will air on February 27.

RELATED: ‘RHOSLC’: Whitney Rose Apologizes to Mary Cosby for Calling Her a ‘Predator’

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Salt lake city

Latest cut shows Salt Lake City is plagued by poor homelessness policy

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Salt Lake City Police participate in the clearance of Fort Pioneer, Thursday, Feb. 17, 2022.

Recently, I witnessed another example of the failure of Salt Lake City‘s homeless policy when the residents of Fort Pioneer were evicted. The reduction of the camp, under an anonymous, industrial overpass far removed and ironically within sight of the Deseret Industries “welfare plaza” silo, displaced more than a hundred people.

Some people left early for the sake of self-preservation, but many couldn’t or simply refused. Living on the streets cost these workers and all those who refused to be evicted their means of survival – tents and warm bedding, work tools and clothing, and anything else worth preserved, from life-saving medicines to the ashes of family members, even the identification needed to access future services.

And what is the cost to taxpayers of this abuse of power? We will never know the true cost of the countless cops in bulletproof vests doing the time and a half, the multiple dump trucks driving back and forth to the dump, the tow trucks dragging cars and RVs to pounds already overcrowded with other roaming city sweeps, health department and pickups. All those resources we repeatedly assign to repeatedly disrupt the lives of a few wandering humans and then do it again next week. The dollar cost of each operation is surely measured in the hundreds of thousands, not to mention the fundraisers that follow for impound fees and bail. The emotional trauma and fallout of losing your home and having nothing is even harder to measure, let alone overcome.

Mayor Mendenhall blames other towns in the valley for kicking the homeless. Other valley mayors blame the state legislature or the health department for the cuts. If you ask around enough, the swipes would seem like nobody’s responsibility.

But the police don’t fund themselves, they tend to do as they are told.

Although no one with the required power wanted to stop this particular reduction (despite only four shelter beds available that day), the recent sweep was just one of many, and it won’t be. surely not the last. The evictees are probably camping in another unnamed location; I hope their sleep will not be interrupted.

Rather than continuing to spend taxpayers’ money on police-enforced sanitation cuts, why not just provide the missing services such as bathrooms and showers, trash removal, tents and electric blankets? ?

Jake Trimble, Salt Lake City

Send a letter to the editor

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Salt lake city

Police link unsolved murder to Salt Lake market shooting

Unified Police say the shooting death of Akosita Kaufusi, whose body was found near Saltair in Magna in 2020, is linked to a shooting at a Salt Lake City market days earlier. (Carissa Hutchinson, KSLTV)

Estimated reading time: 3-4 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Unified Police say they believe an unsolved homicide and a shooting at a Salt Lake market days earlier are related.

But detectives are not revealing many other details about the connection between the murder of Akosita Kaufusi, 42, whose body was found by a jogger near the Great Saltair in 2020, and a shooting that occurred at around the same time at the K&K African Market, 996 S. Redwood Road.

Police said, however, that Kaufusi frequently visited this market.

Kaufusi’s body was discovered on August 29, 2020, just off Frontage Road near Saltair. An autopsy determined that she had been shot in the head and had been dead for several days before her body was discovered. No one has been arrested in this case, despite a $5,000 reward being offered for information leading to the conviction of the person or persons responsible.

On Thursday, Unified Police released a brief statement saying detectives “linked” Kaufusi’s shooting death to a shooting at the K&K Market on August 9, 2020.

Police were called to the market at around 6.20am after being informed of a shooting. The victim, however, claimed his injury was caused by falling on rebar, according to a Salt Lake Police Watch Log report.

“Witnesses at the scene said there was an argument between the victim and several Polynesian men and heard what sounded like a gunshot,” the report said.

The man was taken to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Detectives recovered a casing from the scene.

Police have not explained why they believe the two incidents are linked. However, Unified Police issued a public appeal on Thursday asking anyone with information about the shooting to come forward.

According to police reports, Salt Lake City officers also responded to a report of shots being fired in the K&K market two days earlier on August 7, 2020.

“When they arrived, they were unable to locate a victim or find any witnesses. A casing was located at the scene. Shortly after, a gunshot victim arrived at a local hospital. Officers n ‘were unable to interview the victim,’ according to a watchdog report.

Unified Police detectives have interviewed several people since Kaufusi’s death. Family members told investigators that Kaufusi had been missing for two weeks before her body was discovered, which was “out of the ordinary” for her because “she is usually at the African market and easy to find”, according to the sources. search warrant affidavits.

Based on the evidence gathered so far, detectives believe Kaufusi was killed around or shortly after August 14, 2020. Unified Police acknowledged Friday that Kaufusi and her associates were often at the K&K Market, but do not believe she was shot there.

Several people interviewed by police said Kaufusi was killed “because she had a drug debt or was robbed and killed for drugs, and/or both,” the warrants say. Unified Police said as of Friday no such motive had been confirmed or ruled out.

Police were also told by multiple people that Kaufusi “had a physical fight a few days before she was last seen alive around the day of August 13,” according to one of the warrants.

Anyone with information about Kaufusi’s death is asked to call police at 801-743-7000.

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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City drops blasting plan as end of Raging Waters demolition nears

The abandoned Raging Rivers water park on Wednesday afternoon. The contractors were originally scheduled to begin blasting on Wednesday, but that idea was scrapped following feedback from neighborhood residents. (Chopper 5, KSL-TV)

Estimated reading time: 2-3 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Contractors begin work this week to remove one of the last — and trickiest — parts of the ongoing demolition of the former Raging Rivers water park in the Glendale neighborhood.

The park’s old pools were made of thick concrete that sank deep into the ground. In fact, the Salt Lake City Department of Parks and Public Lands announced last week that contractors would have to blast the area starting Wednesday due to thick concrete.

However, this idea was dropped following comments from the neighborhood over the past few days, which expressed concern about the noise and shaking the blasting would cause. Instead, construction crews use backhoes and jackhammers to complete the difficult concrete removal.

Raging Waters, also known as Seven Peaks Salt Lake, closed in 2018. It quickly became an eyesore and an area of ​​increased crime in the city, leading to the decision to tear it down. The city began its demolition in October; Wednesday, there are still a few slides left but most have been dismantled at the demolition site.

Months before demolition, Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall proposed turning the 17-acre lot near 1700 south and 1200 west into a regional park, similar to Liberty or Sugar House parks in the eastern part of the town.

This vision is still the expected future of the region.

Nancy Monteith, senior landscape architect for Salt Lake City‘s engineering division, told KSL-TV on Wednesday that she hopes the city will have two or three concept plans to share with residents in a few weeks. The land is already located next to the Glendale Golf Course and the Jordan River Parkway. There is a small neighborhood park just north of this that the popular trail crosses.

The city has already spent $3.2 million on the site’s initial development, using impact fees, Monteith added. Fees are one-time developer payments for each new building in the city that can only be used for certain sources, such as parks.

“We’re really excited about this project,” she said. “When you look at all these spaces aggregated, they’re really like a regional attraction.”

The final plan will likely require more money, which is why Mendenhall requested $10 million for the project last year. The mayor explained at the time that the way the city received federal funding for the park in the past required it to remain a park “in perpetuity,” meaning the land cannot be developed for housing. or commercial spaces.

Regarding the current phase of demolition, residents with concerns or questions regarding the blasting are encouraged to call 385-495-5323.

Contributor: Jed Boal

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Salt lake city government

COVID vaccine passport ban moves through Utah legislature

A bill to ban the use of vaccine passports by employers or governments has passed the House despite concerns that it takes an overly broad approach that could hamper future public health efforts.

HB60 would essentially make vaccination status a protected class – similar to race, gender and religion – and prevent employers from requiring vaccination as a condition of employment. The bill comes amid a pushback against COVID-19 vaccination requirements, but is not limited to the current pandemic.

That’s why Rep. Timothy Hawkes, R-Centerville, unsuccessfully tried to replace the bill with one that would only apply to COVID-19. He called his substitution a “scalpel approach” that would achieve the goal of preventing coronavirus vaccine passports without tying the hands of health officials in future pandemics – which could be deadlier than COVID. -19.

Hawkes argued that creating a “protected class” of people based on vaccination status would place an undue burden on companies. While such burdens are necessary to protect people based on their race or gender, he said vaccination status was different.

Rep. Timothy Hawkes, R-Centerville, shows his vaccination card on his phone while discussing HB60 at the Capitol in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022. The bill would prohibit governments or employers from requiring passports to vaccines.
Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

He pointed to the exemptions in the bill for health industries as evidence that vaccines can be constrained in certain situations.

“That’s because vaccines are a bit tricky, because a communicable disease potentially affects someone else’s rights,” Hawkes said. “It’s tricky that way, and that’s why we don’t treat it the same way we might treat race or religion or things like that. If it was something like race or religion … we would not accept any exemptions to that.

Rep. Jennifer Dailey-Provost, D-Salt Lake City, also supported the substitution, arguing it puts “our state and our businesses in Utah in extreme jeopardy.”

Hawkes’ motion to target the COVID-19 bill failed and the House passed the previous version that was discussed in committee last week.

Representative Walt Brooks, R-St.  George, speaks about HB60, which he sponsors, in the House Chamber at the Salt Lake City Capitol on Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022. The bill would prohibit governments or employers from requiring vaccines.

Representative Walt Brooks, R-St. George, speaks about HB60, which he sponsors, in the House Chamber at the Capitol in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022. The bill would prohibit governments or employers from requiring vaccine passports.
Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

Representative Walt Brooks, R-St. George, who sponsored the bill, acknowledged the difficulty of balancing individual liberty and public health, but said he thought the bill did a good job.

“No one has the right to access your personal information. You have no right to go out and spread disease. So we have to figure out where to draw that line,” he said.

Brooks argued that his bill is an effort to protect citizens’ privacy and would prevent them from having to “show papers” to enter businesses and public spaces. Privacy was a key factor for others who spoke in favor of the bill.

“It’s worth having a protected class related to privacy. … We need to stop interfering with each other’s health information,” said Rep. Brady Brammer, R-Highland.

If a future crisis arises, Brammer said the legislature and governor could create exemptions to the bill or pass future laws to enact vaccine mandates if necessary. The governor has the power to declare a public health emergency for up to 30 days, after which the legislature would have to vote to maintain it.

Rep. Merrill Nelson, R-Grantsville, took issue with repeated calls for privacy and freedom that make no mention of the responsibility to protect each other. Even though Utahans are learning to live with the virus, he pointed out that COVID-19 has wreaked havoc in the state.

“We often hear now, what are the low infection rates and low death rates, ‘It only killed 1,000 people.’ Which, you know, I guess it’s okay if it doesn’t include your family,” he said.

To date, 4,372 Utahns have died from COVID-19, according to the Utah Department of Health.

The bill ignores the “social compact” people have as a society, Nelson said, and “grants our citizens the right to infect others.” From a conservative perspective, he likened the issue to that of abortion, saying he thinks the woman’s right to “bodily autonomy” is superseded by the fetus’ right to life.

Getting vaccinated is an “obligation”, he said, pushing back against those who say they have “a basic, God-given right to go everywhere…whether I’m contagious or not”.

“It’s an entirely selfish perspective on rights,” he said.

“It’s true that we should have a sense of community,” said Rep. Mark Strong, R-Bluffdale. “It’s true that we don’t know what the future holds. But to me, it’s true, from the soles of your feet to the top of your head, that no one should ask you to do something against my will that isn’t reversible.

Closing the discussion, Brooks dismissed the idea of ​​lawmakers “using a mandate to remove a mandate,” saying they were acting as “the voice of the people to remove that mandate.”

“Without this peaceful process, it relies on pitchforks and torches,” he said.

HB60 passed the House 51-23. He now goes to the Senate, where Sen. Michael Kennedy, R-Alpine, is the floor sponsor.

Representative Walt Brooks, R-St.  George, speaks about HB60, which he sponsors, in the House Chamber at the Capitol in Salt <a class=Lake City on Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022. The bill would prohibit governments or employers from requiring vaccines.” data-upload-width=”3000″ src=”https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/ReVVeNiH6hnpmhJwVkM1zy6x6cE=/0x0:3000×1950/1200×0/filters:focal(0x0:3000×1950):no_upscale()/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/23264470/merlin_2909872.jpg”/>

Representative Walt Brooks, R-St. George, speaks about HB60, which he sponsors, in the House Chamber at the Capitol in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022. The bill would prohibit governments or employers from requiring vaccine passports.
Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

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Salt lake city

Utah Police: Man Tells 4-Year-Old To Shoot Officers

Police believe a man told his 4-year-old to shoot officers following a dispute over his order at a McDonald’s drive-thru in suburban Salt Lake City

MIDVALE, Utah — Investigators believe a man told his 4-year-old to shoot officers following a dispute over his order at a McDonald’s drive-thru in suburban Salt Lake City on Monday, a announced the police. An officer was able to hit the gun as it was fired, directing the bullet away.

The unidentified man brandished a gun at the Midvale restaurant’s pickup window, demanding that his order be corrected, Unified Police Department spokesman Sgt. Melody Cutler, said . After workers asked her to go to a holding area while they corrected her order, they called the police, she said.

The man did not cooperate and had to be removed from the car, Cutler said. But, as officers took the man into custody, one of them looked back and saw a gun pointed from a rear window, she said. The officer who slid the gun aside as it fired also shouted “kid” at other officers after seeing how young the shooter was, Cutler said.

A witness observed the man tell the 4-year-old, who was in the back seat with a 3-year-old brother, to fire the gun, Cutler said. She declined to elaborate.

Salt Lake County Sheriff Rosie Rivera said it was a sad day for law enforcement and the community.

“The fact that an adult thinks it’s okay to encourage a four-year-old to pull out a gun and shoot the police illustrates how out of control the campaign against the police has gotten,” he said. she declared.

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Salt lake city government

Time Machine: 30 years ago, the developers of Adam’s Rib were unhappy with a newspaper article

The Adam’s Rib property made news this week, in both 2002 and 1992. In a Rocky Mountain News article 30 years ago, the project was described as having “almost lost credibility.”
Vail Daily Archive

5 years ago

Week of February 23, 2017

George Roberts, the new owner of a 170-acre parcel just south and east of Eagle County Regional Airport, floated several development ideas during a discussion with city council members of Gypsum. His ideas included an upscale RV park and a restricted-act neighborhood for people 55 and older.

The Town of Eagle held a town hall meeting for citizens to provide feedback on the community’s proposed Eagle River Park.



Eagle Valley High School’s Noah Hermosillo won the Class 3A state wrestling title in the 138-pound division.

10 years ago

Week of February 23, 2012



Eagle County was the first of 40 entities to sign the historic Colorado River Cooperative Agreement. The document addressed many water issues, from the Continental Divide to the Utah border.

Construction crews mobilized to the high-altitude aviation training site at Eagle County Regional Airport.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife has moved from its old office west of Glenwood to its new state-of-the-art facility located off Canon Creek Interstate 70.

20 years ago

Week of February 21, 2002

The City of Eagle and Adam’s Rib promoter Fred Kummer were set to reach an out-of-court settlement in their ongoing litigation. The terms of the settlement called for the city to supply water to 60 homes and 30 caretaker units in the Kummer’s Frost Creek development and an additional 135 homes in the ranch property closer to town.

About 400 people turned out for a spaghetti dinner to benefit the proposed indoor skating rink at Eagle.

Coaches of the Eagle Valley High School Nordic Ski Team, Glen Ewing and Diane Argo, brought the team to Salt Lake City to watch the Olympic competition.

30 years ago

Week of February 27, 1992

Developers of the proposed Adam’s Rib Recreation Area objected to comments published in the Rocky Mountain News regarding the project. In an article about the proposed Lake Catamount ski area, the News noted that the planned resort would likely be the last ski area in Colorado to open in the 20th century. About Adam’s Rib, the newspaper reports: “Despite the reassurances of the promoters, the project has been on the drawing board for so long that it has lost almost all credibility.

A group of Eagle residents have strongly criticized a plan to operate a food vendor wagon at the Eagle Regional Visitor Information Center.

Eagle Valley High’s wrestling team came from behind to win the 3A State Wrestling Title. Five Matmen Devils State Tournament medalists.

40 years ago

Week of February 25, 1982

Eagle Valley High School’s wrestling team racked up 116 points in the state tournament, steaming up the competition to win the state title. Ron Abby at 98 pounds, Victor Satterfield at 126 pounds and heavyweight Gordon Brown took state championship honors. Devils coach John Ramunno was named Class A Wrestling Coach of the Year.

Eagle’s Paul Kunkel won first place in the 50+ category of the Beaver Creek Telemarking Spectacular competition.

50 years ago

Week of February 24, 1972

A petition was circulating urging Eagle County commissioners to make immediate improvements to the county airport. The petition cited the need for a longer runway to accommodate larger aircraft.

A proposal by President Richard Nixon to create the 87,755 acre Eagles Nest Wilderness Areas has been forwarded to Congress. The proposed wilderness area was located in the Arapaho and White River National Forests.

Mike Simonds of the Ski Swap Shop announced a one-day sale at Eagle. He planned to set up the sale at Sharp’s Pool Hall and sell skis for as low as $7.50 a pair and boots from $5 a pair.

The Eagle Valley High School rodeo team began training for the season. The team planned to compete in 12 rodeos in 1972.

60 years ago

Week of February 22, 1962

Zurcher’s Lake, located at the west fork of Brush Creek south of Eagle, was at the center of a US tax lien dispute. The US government lien was over $80,000. At one point, the Colorado State Game and Fish Department attempted to obtain the property. Past owners of the lake included Anthony Snede and Otto Zurcher, who operated a mink farm on the property. “The lake is one of the most beautiful bodies of water in the region and is ideal for resort development,” the Enterprise reported. Zurcher Lake would later be renamed Sylvan Lake.

Residents of Burns have weighed in on the issue of the condition of the county’s roads. “You who live in cities don’t realize how lucky you are,” notes the community’s letter to the editor.

70 years ago

Week of February 21, 1952

The Loveland Tunnel Association held its first meeting in Glenwood Springs. The group’s mission was to rekindle interest in the proposal to build a tunnel under the Continental Divide.

Eagle County schools were wrapping up the basketball season with a tournament in Gypsum. A competition for primary schools was planned to kick off the event.

Meanwhile, the high school teams of Gypsum and McCoy were battling for fourth place honors at the Upper Colorado League Tournament. Minturn’s team faced Carbondale for the championship title.

The Wolcott Willing Workers Club raised $25 in a bake sale and members voted to donate $2 each to local heart, cancer and Red Cross fundraisers.

80 years ago

Week of February 20, 1942

A total of 443 Eagle County men have completed their military registration with the local Selective Services Board. Registration was compulsory nationwide for all men between the ages of 20 and 44.

The Eagle County High School Pirates outscored the Eagle High School Eagles, 42-13, in a home basketball game. “Eagle gave the Pirates a much better game than the score would indicate,” the Enterprise reported.

The Eagle County Chapter of the American Red Cross raised more than $2,100 for the War Relief Fund.

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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City shooting leaves man in serious condition

SALT LAKE CITY — A man was taken to hospital in serious condition after a shooting in Salt Lake City on Saturday night.

Police report that around 5.30pm teams were dispatched to 25 North Redwood Road following a call that a person had been shot.

Initially, when they arrived at the scene, officers reportedly found a man inside a vehicle with a “shooting-related injury”.

Based on the initial investigation, it appeared the suspect or suspects fired from a vehicle and then left the scene, police report.

In an update later Saturday night, Salt Lake police reported that the man was not directly shot, but rather had cuts from broken glass during the shooting.

Police also said that after being treated in hospital, the man was released.

Officers have identified two crime scenes associated with the incident. One stage is located at North Temple and North Cornell Street, and the other is located at 1530 West North Temple.

Police have not yet been able to verify a suspect.

Exactly what happened on each of the individual scenes was not made immediately available. The identity of the man who was shot has also not been released.

Police are asking anyone with information, photos or video related to the shooting to call 801-799-3000 and referral case 22-31030.

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Salt lake city government

New bill would force Salt Lake officials to come up with plan for winter homeless shelter

For three winters, governments and nonprofits in Salt Lake County struggled to set up an emergency homeless shelter.

Representative Steve Eliason, R-Sandy offers options in a new bill.

Essentially, HB 440 demands that Salt Lake County government officials come up with a plan for at least one homeless overflow shelter by September 1 – well before the first snow usually falls.

Then this plan will be approved by the Utah Office of Homeless Services. If the proposal does not meet the bureau’s criteria, the state could operate a temporary overflow shelter at a state-owned facility in Salt Lake County.

Alternatively, the bill also allows county homeless resource centers to expand their occupancy until permitted by the fire code.

Eliason said it was essential that unprotected people have options.

“At the bare minimum, I hope this will help get people out of the winter cold to at least somewhere safe and warm where they can spend the night,” Eliason said. “But our goal, of course, is much broader. We need to keep people alive to hopefully get out of homelessness completely.

This winter, Salt Lake-based service providers struggled to open — and keep open — overflow shelters. Just this week the Weigand Center Overflow had to close for lack of staff. The former Ramada Inn, which serves both seniors with medical needs and serves as an emergency shelter for the general public, was also slow to open.

One of the reasons for the difficulty is that it is a difficult to ask for cities to operate a refuge. Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall has made it clear that she thinks the capital had to “take on greater responsibility than other municipalities in the state to provide shelter and services to the state’s homeless population”.

City officials had little to say about Eliason’s proposal at this point.

“We appreciate that Rep. Eliason is always ready to tackle this difficult issue,” said Andrew Wittenberg, the mayor’s spokesman. “We are still working on the details of the bill.”

But Wendy Garvin, who does community outreach through the Unsheltered Utah group, said it was a solid solution. She said the lack of available shelter during the winter is “the biggest problem we have”.

“It’s really frustrating,” Garvin said. “It’s really emotional because the majority of what we’re doing right now is saying to people, ‘I’m really sorry, we don’t have the resources for that.'”

The bill also provides additional funding for cities to mitigate the impacts of homeless shelters.

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Salt lake city

See the latest $20 million vision for Salt Lake City’s Pioneer Park upgrade

New plans call for the addition of trees, a clubhouse, and pickleball and basketball courts, while improving walkways and spaces for the popular downtown farmers’ market.

(Salt Lake City) A conceptual vision of improvements to Pioneer Park in downtown Salt Lake City, a glimpse of the renovated park looking south.

Editor’s Note This story is available only to Salt Lake Tribune subscribers. Please support local journalism.

Salt Lake City is finalizing a new $20 million vision for the renovation of Pioneer Park as the downtown area surrounding it continues to grow in population.

The latest of many plans for this premier urban green space was presented to a positive but cautious city council this week. Concepts developed by city staff and the Salt Lake City-based design studio — and gleaned from public feedback — include new groves of trees, remodeled walkways, better lighting, a performance pavilion , additional sports facilities and other amenities intended to make the 10-acre park more inclusive and attractive.

There would also be a new drought-sensitive water misting feature, a playground, two new nearby transit stations and improved spaces for the park’s popular downtown farmers’ market, according to reports. newer concepts, which city officials say are still being worked on.

(Salt Lake City) A conceptual vision for improvements to Pioneer Park in downtown Salt Lake City. (1) A water mist feature. (2) and (3) signs. (4) transit station stops. (5) self-cleaning toilets.

It’s the oldest park in Utah’s capital, with 175 years of history and a reputation in recent decades for being run down and prone to crime and vagrancy. After many discussions and several proposals for improvement put aside since 2003, these plans could become reality as early as 2023.

Assuming, that is, the city leaders choose to allocate the money.

“The project looks amazing,” said new council member Alejandro Puy, representing District 2 on the West Side. “Hopefully we can do that.”

The area has added more residents since 2010 than any other part of the city, and at least 1,016 more homes are now planned within a 15-minute walk of the block-sized park. Still, parks in general remain scarce in the urban core and rising land values ​​are making it harder for the city to create new green spaces, according to city manager Kristin Riker. Public Lands Department.

(Salt Lake City) A conceptual vision for improvements to Pioneer Park in downtown Salt Lake City. This east-facing view illustrates some of the plan’s visions for the downtown farmers’ market.

Residents of the park and across the city have consistently been supportive of its improvement in a series of surveys. The latest survey reveals that half of those questioned are extremely or somewhat dissatisfied with the park in its current state.

The latest plan, Riker said, focuses on improving the park’s natural features with more shade trees planted than would be removed and new expanses of natural vegetation. The upgrades would also aim to increase comfort in hopes of attracting more visitors, with new seating, toilets, a cafe and a ranger station.

Security would also be enhanced, Riker said, with more round-the-clock operations, staff, and designs that provide open sightlines across the park. And there would be new basketball and pickleball courts, lawn games and improvements to the dog park.

“This will truly be your downtown park,” Riker added, echoing the city’s theme as he solicited public input on his new designs.

(Salt Lake City) A conceptual vision for improvements to Pioneer Park in downtown Salt Lake City. This southeast view shows part of a proposed pavilion and reconfigured walkways.

History also looms large in the city. External consultants made Pioneer Park the subject of the very first “Cultural Landscape Report”, detailing its rich past as a guide for future upgrades. Plans for the park will get their second airing before the city Historic Monuments Commission early March.

The city has $3.4 million in park impact fees charged to developers, which could help propel Pioneer Park’s new vision, Riker said. The wave of downtown apartment construction could generate an additional $2.9 million in costs.

Meanwhile, discussions are underway at City Hall about putting a new bond in front of voters to help pay for a host of new open-air amenities, including Pioneer Park. Regardless of the city’s efforts, businesses supported Pioneer Park Coalition is seeking an additional $15 million for the park from the Utah Legislature.

(Salt Lake City) A conceptual vision for improvements to Pioneer Park in downtown Salt Lake City. This north-facing view depicts a proposed concert and event pavilion in the park.

Coalition lobbyist Scott Howell said Pioneer Park’s request has so far received a mixed reception from state budget lawmakers as they approach their March 4 adjournment. But the idea, Howell said, is that any money from state coffers would be matched by surrounding business owners.

“We’re not there yet,” Riker said of the $15 million request. “We are still waiting to see if the funds arrive.”

For its part, Salt Lake City is expected to incur new Pioneer Park spending as part of its annual program. capital improvement budget — and it is not done.

While receptive to the new vision, Puy and other council members said Tuesday that before allocating additional funds to Pioneer Park, they wanted to balance the budgetary needs of other city parks. Also vying on that priority list, they said, are Allen Park on the east side; a new regional park being considered to replace the now closed Glendale Water Park on the west side; and the possibility of creating new public green space on the city-owned Fleet Block on the eastern edge of the Granary district.

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Utah economy

Outdoor retailer: Governor Spencer Cox sends mixed signals as he returns to Utah

Utah Governor Spencer Cox sent decidedly mixed signals Thursday regarding his feelings about the potential return of lucrative outdoor retailer shows to Salt Lake City after the event owner moved the shows to Denver. five years ago amid swirling controversy over federal land use issues.

Event owner Emerald X is set to announce where the shows will be held under a new contract that begins in 2023. Salt Lake City competes with Denver and other potential venues for the gatherings which, before the COVID-19 pandemic, regularly attracted tens of thousands.

And, earlier this week, dozens of outdoor companies, including industry heavyweights Patagonia, REI, North Face and others, vowed to boycott Outdoor Retailer shows if they return to the Utah.

On the one hand, Cox said at his monthly KUED press conference on Thursday that the roughly $50 million in economic inflow that comes with each of the biannual shows — hosted by Salt Lake City for 20 years before coming out in 2017 — n were no longer needed. in Utah’s booming economy.

“We were told (the Outdoor Retailer shows leaving Utah) would be the end of the world, that our economy would collapse, that businesses would never move here, it would be awful for our state,” Cox said.

“Turns out none of that happened. We have the best economy in the country. Our outdoor industry is thriving, it’s stronger than it’s ever been. That’s one of the reasons they’re trying to bring him back here.

Cox said show owners and exhibitors had the worst end to the exit decision because they lost their “seat at the table” to engage in meaningful discussions about land use and policies with the governor and state legislators when the end result for the state was “we didn’t miss them at all.

But some of the same people in the outdoor industry who threatened to leave in 2017 over GOP state leaders’ support for cuts to federal land protections issued an apology after Emerald announced the shows were moving. in Denver, Cox said. And, he would still like to see the shows return to Utah.

“If Patagonia and these other companies really care about this issue, they’re going to want to be here having this discussion, not going somewhere where everyone thinks exactly like them,” Cox said. “We would like them to come back. We desperately want them back.

While bringing the shows back to Utah, Cox said, would give Outdoor Retailer attendees a direct link to elected officials to discuss policy issues, he pointed out that the boycotts promised, if the shows return to Utah, will not will have no impact on his position. on matters of use and protection of federal lands.

“That kind of boycott will do absolutely nothing to change the politics that’s going on here in the state of Utah,” Cox said. “Not even an inch. We won’t think about it anymore. »

While dismissing the effectiveness of boycott threats, Cox also said he’s open to finding common ground with outdoor industry representatives and believes Salt Lake City easily beats Denver when it comes to the best locations for Outdoor Retailer events.

“Obviously coming back to Salt Lake makes sense,” Cox said. “Our airport is closer, our venues are cheaper, our locations are much closer. Come back and join the discussion. You can help make a difference. You can help temper some of the things that are happening.

“We can find common ground. We may not agree on everything, but I think there are some things we definitely agree on.

On Tuesday, the Deseret News reported on a letter signed by more than two dozen outdoor industry companies promising to boycott Outdoor Retailer shows if the biannual events return to Salt Lake City.

The letter was released on Monday by The Conservation Alliance, a group dedicated to land conservation efforts that counts more than 270 companies as members. The website posting urges Emerald X to stay out of Utah due to members’ objections to the longstanding stance taken by state leaders to oppose federal land protections.

“We have united in declaring that we will not support or attend a trade show in Utah as long as its elected officials continue to attack national monuments and the protection of public lands,” the letter reads. “Industry leaders express their support for the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition and its longstanding efforts to protect the homelands of tribes and pueblos with cultural ties to the Bears Ears landscape, as well as the overwhelming majority of the outdoor industry and America’s public.

“Despite widespread industry objections, Emerald has demonstrated continued interest in moving the Outdoor Retailer show to Utah, a state that is leading the fight against designated national monuments and public lands.”

Cox was specifically named in the letter as the leader of Utah’s effort to “strip these magnificent lands from federal protection while simultaneously trying to woo Emerald to move the Outdoor Retailer show from Denver to Salt Lake City.” .

The Utah capital lost its contract with Denver in 2017 as plans announced by then-President Donald Trump to cut several areas of federally protected land angered the environmental community, outdoor enthusiasts and companies specializing in outdoor products and services. At the center of the controversy was Trump’s stated intention to reduce the 1.35 million acre Bears Ears National Monument, created by President Barack Obama in a 2016 proclamation issued just before he left office. .

Utah state legislators and government at the time. Gary Herbert backed the Trump plan by passing a resolution during the 2017 legislative session declaring “strong opposition to the designation of Bears Ears National Monument” and urging Trump to rescind his predecessor’s executive order.

Following President Joe Biden’s decision to reverse Trump’s cuts in Utah, Cox, GOP state legislative leaders and all six members of Utah’s congressional delegation have declared their opposition to reinstatement protections. Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes said he intends to take legal action against Biden’s land protection changes.

Emerald X is expected to announce the new host city for Outdoor Retailer soon, and Marisa Nicholson, Senior Vice President and Show Manager of Outdoor Retailer, said her company evaluated all issues and options before entering into a new contract.

“Outdoor Retailer and Emerald remain committed to supporting the outdoor and winter sports industries by hosting gatherings that both meet business needs and foster the spirit of our community,” Nicholson said in a statement. “We have had ongoing conversations with many in our industry and consider all input and perspectives, including responses to recent surveys – we value the passion and respect everyone’s point of view.

“As we continue the process of evaluating all possible and realistic options, we remain thoughtful in our deliberations. Our goal is to stage a dynamic event that not only reflects today’s new normal, but also presents an engaging event that brings more people to this community in an authentic and affordable way. No decisions regarding future dates or location have been made at this time, and we look forward to sharing our thoughts in the coming days.

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Salt lake city government

We elected the most diverse city council in history. Now what?

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Alejandro Puy, District 2, is sworn in as a member of the Salt Lake City Council, Monday, Jan. 3, 2022.

Last November, when thousands of West Salt Lake voters cast their ballots, I became the first-ever Latino elected to represent Salt Lake City‘s most diverse community. (District 2 is a predominantly Latino district, with a very diverse mix of cultures and nationalities.)

If you’re surprised by this, you wouldn’t be the first, and you’re certainly not the only one. The truth is that critical barriers to entry still exist for minorities seeking to run for office. Only when we understand what barriers exist can we break them down, paving the way for a new generation of diverse representation in Salt Lake City and our state. The incredible time commitment, the expectation of a traditional education in a decidedly non-traditional world, economic demands, trust, and political connections can leave everyday Utahns behind when it comes to representation.

But politics – becoming an elected official and serving your community – shouldn’t be open only to white, educated, wealthy people. We always talk about the lack of diversity in elected and volunteer positions; how valuable voices from different backgrounds are in our government. We desperately need diverse voices, but now this City Council I serve on, in tandem with Salt Lake County and the State of Utah, must do all we can to break down the walls we’ve had to cross to get here, when no one else ever has to fight.

I know the walls first hand. As a recently naturalized immigrant, I had to balance my personal obligations, putting many of them on hiatus, and my desire to serve my community. I was fortunate to have the opportunity to take time off from work from the day I filed my application until the end of our campaign. I am single and I have no children. I worked in politics, made connections, and knew what it took to run in Salt Lake City for years before I decided to file a case. I was lucky, and the system shouldn’t just reward the lucky ones.

But how do you open up the opportunity to others: the single mother on the West Side, who works two jobs, who wants to serve her community to create a better future for her children — how to create a town where she can volunteer for a city council or run for office without it creating an undue burden on his life?

Provide plenty of affordable and accessible childcare opportunities, expand public access to technology like a working computer and webcam that is imperative for joining boardrooms, running and showing up at virtual town halls and meetings constituencies, and making advanced civic education easily accessible to all are good starts. Yet they demand that all of our city councils, our county council, and our state legislature come together to make representation for all of us truly possible for all of us.

I will continue to work to make the application more accessible to everyone. And if you are eager to serve your neighbors as a volunteer or elected official, I hope you will join me in breaking down barriers and creating a stronger, more representative Salt Lake City where all voices are heard and valued.

Alejandro “Ale” Puy | Salt Lake City Council

Alejandro “Ale” Puy represents District 2 on the Salt Lake City Council.

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Salt lake city

#13 Oregon State Heads to Salt Lake City for Showdown at #4 Utah

CORVALLIS, Oregon- Thirteenth-ranked Oregon State Gymnastics is set for its first of the final three road clashes of the season when the Beavers travel to Salt Lake City this Friday, Feb. 18, to take on No. 4. The Beavers (6-1) and Utes (7-1) face off at 5:00 p.m. PT inside the Jon M. Huntsman Center and will be televised on the Pac-12 Network with Jim Watson and Amanda Borden at the call.

THE BEAVES IN THE CLASSIFICATION
The Beavers remain 13th after last weekend’s 197.275 performance against Washington, averaging 196.755 in their fifth week of competition. Next week, the ranking will change to the National Qualifying Score (NQS). A team’s NQS is calculated by taking the season’s six highest scores, three of which must be road scores, removing the highest score, and averaging the other five. As a result, the Oregon State team and individuals will not be ranked until March 7. The Orange and Blacks are ranked sixth on floor, tenth on vault, No. 14 on beam and moved up to No. 24 on bars. Individually, Jade Carey ranks first in the nation in all-around with an average of 39.760 while being No. 1 on bars, No. 3 on floor, No. 6 on balance beam and No. 9 on vault. Kaitlyn Yanish and Madi Dagen are tied for 39th on floor while Yanish holds sole possession at 39 on vault.

WEEK FIVE QUICK STICKS

At its annual “Dam Change” meeting on Sunday, February 13, Oregon State finished with its second-highest score of the 2022 campaign 197.275 to defeat Washington and move to 6-0 at home… Jade Carey won three individual titles in the all-around (39.750), bars (9.975) and floor (10.0) and ended her 18-event streak of 9.9… the Olympic gold medalist now holds 23 titles individual… senior Madi Dagen nearly matched his career-high all-around with a 39.525 which was highlighted by the title on beam (9.925) and tied a career-high on floor (9.925)… rookie Lauren Letzsch added career highs on vault (9.85) and floor (9.925) and senior Kaitlyn Yanish posted a career-high 9.975 on floor … with help from Carey, Yanish, Dagen and Letzsch, the Beavers were just .025 away from tying the floor program record with a 39.675 on Sunday.

SEASONAL QUICK STICKS

OSU hit 113 of 120 routines this season… Gymnasts who hit every routine arand kayla bird (ten) Carley Beeman (4-4), Jade Carey (20-20), Karlie Chavez (5-5), Sydney Gonzales (15-15), Lauren Letzsch (15-15) and Kaitlyn Yanish (10-10) … The individual event winners this season are Carey (23), Madi Dagen (1) and Domingo (1).

UTAH SERIES

The Utes lead the overall series with Oregon State, 73-10-1, which includes a 35-0 record at Salt Lake City…The Beavers have lost the last four meetings with the last win at Corvallis in 2017…Last season, Oregon The state fell from 197,575 to 196,425 in Gill as Kaitlyn Yanish captured his sixth floor title of the season with a 9.95… Sydney Gonzales clocked a new personal best 9.9 to win his first individual title on vault.

UTE SCOUTING

Utah is coached by Tom Farden who is in his 12th season overall and his seventh year at the helm…The Utes fell one spot this week to fourth, averaging 197.496 this season…Utah scored 49, 0 or better in every event in 18 consecutive meets, which is the longest active streak and holds the highest beam score in the nation at a 49.725… Utah has hit 135-144 routines this season with eight gymnasts hitting each routine… Maile O’Keefe leads the Utes in all-around, averaging 39.550 this season ranking her 12th… She’s also third in the nation on beam (9.938) after posting a perfect 10 on apparatus.

FOLLOWING

Oregon State returns home for its final inside Gill meeting this season, hosting No. 18 Stanford for senior day on Friday, Feb. 25. The Beavers and Cardinal are due to face off at 7:30 p.m. PT on the Pac-12 Network. After the conclusion, OSU will honor its three seniors by Alexa McClung, Colette Yamaokaand Kaitlyn Yanish.

Single season and meet tickets for the 2022 Oregon State Gymnastics season are available for purchase through BeaverTickets.com and 1-800-GO-BEAVS.

For more information on the Oregon State gymnastics team, follow the club’s official Twitter account at Twitter.com/BeaverGym, by Facebook at Facebook.com/BeaverGym or on Instagram at Instagram.com/BeaverGym.

OUR MISSION
Oregon State Athletics strives to Bto construct Eexcellent Aauthentic Visionary Sstudent-Aathletes (Go BEAVS).


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Salt lake city government

Utah GOP-led death penalty repeal bill fails vote

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A push to repeal the death penalty in Utah has been narrowly defeated, but a…

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A push to repeal the death penalty in Utah was narrowly defeated, but an emotional hearing this week laid bare the divisions among conservatives that have taken shape in state homes led by Republicans.

In Utah, which became the first state to execute someone after the US Supreme Court lifted its moratorium in 1976, lawmakers on Monday night rejected a Republican-sponsored measure that would have kept the corridor of state’s death, but barred prosecutors from pursuing capital punishment in the future. .

The proposal missed a vote to clear a House committee focused on criminal justice, with five votes in favor and six against.

The discussion touched on familiar, decades-old arguments about the nature of justice, wrongful convictions and costs. But this time, opponents argued that the death penalty could also add pain and suffering to victims’ families. They said the lengthy appeal process prolongs the harm inflicted on the relatives of the victims. By making the impact on victims a central point of the repeal campaign, they have blurred what has traditionally been one of the main arguments of proponents: that the death penalty bring justice to the victims of heinous crimes and their families.

While a number of these families support capital punishment, Sharon Wright Weeks is among those who have come to believe that the death penalty has made it harder to shut down. His sister and 15-month-old niece were killed in a crime chronicled in the book ‘Under the Banner of Heaven’. She was initially in favor of a death sentence for one of the men responsible, but nearly four decades of appeals, retrials and jurisdictional hearings changed her mind.

“It’s endless. It’s like carrying this huge weight that gets heavier and heavier and heavier,” she told The Associated Press.

Brenda Lafferty, Weeks’ sister, was murdered in 1984 along with her daughter Erica, by two of her brothers-in-law, Ron and Dan Lafferty. Dan got life in prison. Ron was sentenced to death, but before being executed he died in prison of natural causes.

Weeks’ story convinced Utah Republican Representative Lowry Snow to sponsor the repeal proposal.

Recent repeals of the death penalty have been passed only in Democratic-controlled states. But Snow defined his push as part of a growing movement of Republican lawmakers in red states who, like him, are taking leading roles in the push to abolish the practice.

Of the 24 states with active death penalty laws, repeal measures were introduced in at least five Republican-majority legislatures last year: Wyoming, Ohio, Kansas, Georgia and Kentucky. A repeal has yet to pass in any Republican-led state, but in Ohio last year Republicans passed a law prohibiting the execution of people with serious mental illness at the time of their crime.

A bill to repeal the death penalty also advanced in Utah in 2016, a year after the state revived the firing squad as a fallback method for executions if deadly drugs aren’t used. not available.

For many, the conservative case against the death penalty bears similarities to arguments against abortion. “He’s making a case for the totality of life,” said Demetrius Minor of the group Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty.

Republicans like Snow have also pointed to wrongful convictions for suggesting giving the state the power to take life in conflict with their petty principles of government. They argued the high price of the death penalty made it fiscally irresponsible in some states, including Utah, where a 2018 state report found the state had spent $40 million prosecuting dozens. death penalty cases, only two of which resulted in a death sentence.

“We have next to nothing to show for it,” Snow said. “How would it be better to redirect that to helping victims and the families of victims?”

Weeks, a self-proclaimed political moderate, does not object to the concept of ending a killer’s life. But while life-sentenced brother Dan Lafferty has largely faded into the background of her life, the death sentence has forced her to spend the majority of her adult life in a painful process with no way out.

“I don’t want anyone else to have to go through this again,” she said.

Family members of other victims said on Monday that the heinous killings that took their loved ones away from them deserved punishment. Lawmakers heard from relatives of woman who was stabbed multiple times before being shot in the head; murder victims whose bodies were thrown into a mine shaft; and several women who had their throats cut.

Andrew Peterson, Utah attorney general‘s capital cases coordinator, said the death penalty allows prosecutors to fulfill “society’s commitment to victims to seek proportionate justice to honor life.” and the dignity of a victim”.

Removing the death penalty from the table, victims’ relatives have said, would deprive prosecutors of an essential plea-bargaining tool they use to secure life without parole in aggravated murder cases.

Family members of Lizzy Shelley, a child who was raped and murdered in 2019, say the threat of the death penalty led Alexander William Whipple, the girl’s uncle, to tell law enforcement order that the body could be found, sparing the family the agony of not knowing its fate.

“There are, in my opinion, certain people who have committed such heinous crimes that I believe the only way to repay the crime is with their own lives,” said Norman Black, Shelley’s grandfather.

Rep. Jefferson Burton said it made more sense to first seek to resolve the death penalty’s problems, including cost, wrongful convictions and lengthy appeals, rather than to repeal it and rid the government of a tool that prosecutors and many others say makes society safer. and fairer.

Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

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Salt lake city

Make sure your love letters arrive at the right address

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) — Valentine’s Day is USPS data conversion operator Jayne Demine’s favorite holiday.

“I get really giddy because everything is so cute and we all tell each other that we love each other,” Demine said.

At the USPS’ Remote Encoding Center, she’s able to make sure letters and packages that computers can’t read get to where they need to go. About 3.1 million photos are sent to this center in Salt Lake City every day.

The center was the first of its kind from the USPS in 1994. Shortly after, the USPS opened 55 more locations across the country because at the time there were a lot of letters that the machines couldn’t read.

“Within three years, the machines started getting smarter and they started shutting them down,” said director Barbara Batin.

Batin said the Utah facility is currently the only one in the country, which she says has a lot to do with the people who work there.

“Our employees are some of the best workers in the country. They came up with ideas, things we could do, do our job better, faster, higher quality,” Batin said.

Demine takes great pride in her work and she should. It can process up to 1,000 images in an hour.

“I wish I had one of my little reports with me to show you,” Demine said.

But the report Demine says she’s most proud of isn’t a number, it’s the impact each letter can have on the person who receives it.

“We really should do it more. Take the time to tell our loved ones how much we care,” Demine said.

Below is a list of the most common mistakes that data conversion operators see when sending letters:

  1. Sloppy writing
  2. spelling mistakes
  3. Wrong writing utensils (ex. pencil or gel pens)
  4. Crumpled envelopes

USPS says they always need new employees. In fact, the facility is currently looking to hire about 150 people. If you’re looking for flexible hours, are good at a keyboard, and work well on your own, this could be the perfect job for you. Click here for more information !

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Salt lake city government

Utah legislature decisions reflect tensions between local and state government

The Utah State Capitol Building reflects sunlight. Recent legislative decisions targeting education and public health reflect a pattern of disagreement between state and local government. (Decker Westenburg)

Recent decisions by the Utah legislature targeting education and public health reflect a pattern of disagreement between state and local government.

The Utah legislature ended mask mandates in Salt Lake and Summit counties from Jan. 21 to SJR3, despite conflicting views from local leaders. Earlier this month, Governor Spencer Cox signed into law HB183 which suspended the “test to stay” requirement in public schools and said instead that local leaders make the final decision on whether a school district becomes remote.

Cities and local governments are “creatures” of the state and have the legislature’s permission to make decisions, said University of Utah political science professor Dave Buhler.

“But if the legislature doesn’t like the way it wields its power, it can step in and change the rules,” Buhler said.

Buhler has seen many examples throughout his political career of conflicting decisions between the local and state level. As a state senator, he introduced bills to override city council decisions he disliked. But a few years later, as a member of the Salt Lake City Council, he had a different view and thought: “The Legislature leaves us alone, we get it.

He shared an old saying in politics: “Where you stand depends on where you sit.”

Angela Dunn, MD, is executive director of the Salt Lake County Health Department. Dunn acknowledged lawmakers had the power to overturn the county’s mask mandate in a Jan. 20 interview with KSL NewsRadio.

“I think it’s unfortunate given their priority of keeping control at the local level for the COVID response,” she said.

According to Buhler, it is not an excess of state power for the legislature to terminate local public health orders because it has the power to do so.

“It’s not that unusual, but I feel like the legislature over time has become more and more assertive, both about local governments and in its dealings with the state executive. “, did he declare.

Local control “railing”

HB183 sponsor rep Jordan Teuscher, R-South Jordan, said local control is extremely important to him, but as a state legislator, it’s part of his job to put up “guardrails.” around him. SB107, signed into law in March 2021, had already had heads of state approve a district’s request to go remotely. The new law gives additional procedures for districts to follow and requires approval from the Governor, Speaker of the Senate, Speaker of the House, and State Superintendent before logging on.

Teuscher said school districts did not have enough COVID-19 tests to implement testing to stay through the omicron spike when required by law. Heads of state decided to suspend the test to remain in response to these concerns. If the districts want to test to stay, they can, but there is no longer an obligation.

“So in some ways it made local control over the test to stay and then just set the parameters to how someone would request remote days,” he said.

But state involvement in local issues like education and public health is a concern for some.

“I think it’s more political than anything else,” said Steven Sylvester, a political science professor at Utah Valley University.

Parents already have a democracy — school boards and city councils — where they can voice their objections, Sylvester said. “Why does the state need to get involved? »

According to Adam Brown, a BYU political science professor who studies state constitutional politics, there is no doubt that the legislature has the power to set broad policies at the local level. For example, states have independent authority while cities, counties, and school districts only have delegated state powers. States have their own constitutions, cities do not.

But HB183 raised constitutionality issues because it gave the Speaker of the House and the Speaker of the Senate vetoes over certain school district decisions, even though they don’t have the executive power to do so under the constitution of the state.

“The Utah Constitution gives the President and the Speaker of the Senate the power to organize the business of their respective chambers, but not to make binding decisions on their own authority,” Brown said. tweeted. “Changing that would presumably require an amendment to the Utah Constitution, not just a law.”

Attorneys Brent D. Wride and Paul C. Burke called on Governor Cox to veto HB183 in an op-ed in the Salt Lake Tribune and claimed he violated Utah’s separation of powers doctrine by assigning powers executives to legislative officers.

“The constitutional flaw in House Bill 183 is that it violates our state’s constitution by granting legislative officers the power to interpret and apply the law,” they wrote.

In response, Teuscher and prosecution sponsor Senator Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, wrote in another op-ed that Article III of the Utah Constitution requires the legislature to establish and maintain the education system. public: the system will be, and any exceptions that might apply.

National model

The United States and Utah flags flutter in the wind at the Utah State Capitol. Some of Utah’s political science professors view the legislature’s involvement in local issues as a broader pattern both in the state and nationwide. (Emma Gadesky)

Some of Utah’s political science professors view the legislature’s involvement in local issues as a broader pattern both in the state and nationwide.

“Whenever the federal government proposes an action that would force states to follow a particular course, you can expect Utah lawmakers to kick and shout and insist on the virtue of local control,” Brown said.

But in Utah, that faith in local control does not extend to restricting the legislature’s control over cities, counties and school districts, he said: ‘And maybe that is logically inconsistent.”

Josh McCrain, a professor of political science at the University of Utah, said state interference in local issues such as education has no basis in real conservatism. It’s counterintuitive to classic party beliefs like individual choice, freedom and small government, he said.

In 2018, Utahans voted to legalize medical marijuana in Proposition 2. According to the Salt Lake Tribune, state lawmakers replaced the voter-approved proposition with the Cannabis Act. Utah Medical. Democrats have argued that the legislature should not overrule voters who approved the ballot initiative the previous month.

Further overbreadth issues arose after former Governor Gary Herbert signed into law HB3005 in May 2020. The law required the governor to notify certain members of the legislature before declaring a state of emergency. Rep. Merrill Nelson, R-Grantsville, worried the legislature was overstepping the bounds and said it seemed unnecessary and excessive, The Daily Universe reported.

Beyond Utah, state governments have a history of getting involved in social issues at the local level. In North Carolina, McCrain said some cities were willing to have progressive gender bathroom policies, but the Republican state government disagreed.

Utah lawmakers in the House of Representatives and Senate are 78 percent Republican and 22 percent Democrat, but the Salt Lake area is more liberal. (Made with Adobe Illustrator by Emma Gadeski)

North Carolina passed House Bill 2 in 2016, which required people in public buildings to use the bathroom that matches the sex on their birth certificate, regardless of their gender identity. This led to boycotts and cost the state millions in lost tourist revenue.

“It had a massive economic backlash because a ton of industry left the state after that, which of course is something that can happen at any time,” McCrain said.

Utah’s legislature is 78% Republican in 2022, but Salt Lake is more liberal. In 2020, 53.6% of Salt Lake County voted for President Joe Biden in the presidential election, compared to 37.6% statewide.

McCrain said it’s important for Utah to control what happens in Salt Lake City because it’s the “economic powerhouse” of the state.

“We usually see this in contexts where it’s a conservative state government and a city, which are usually very liberal,” he said.

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Salt lake city

Why West Valley City is cold-eyed about a renewable energy plan

While all roads lead to clean energy in Utah, some municipalities like West Valley City are leaning towards taking an alternative route to get there.

A 2019 Renewable Energy Bill promised a steady path for local governments to achieve 100% clean energy by 2030. The plan was to push the development of energy infrastructure that would interconnect and power the solar, wind and other carbon-free sources of electricity. directly into the Rocky Mountain Power system.

The Community law on renewable energies, an interlocal agreement born from HB411, began when nearly two dozen Utah cities and counties pledged to achieve the 100% clean energy goal by passing a qualifying resolution, though many other local governments stayed put. touches. The legislation passed with Rep. Stephen Handy, R-Layton, and then the senator. Daniel Hemmert, R-Orem, as sponsors.

However, the implementation of the initiative did not stop there. This multi-year effort required several steps. Currently, advocates are trying to get those eligible cities and counties to sign up for a governance agreement so they can continue in the program.

Membership means cities and counties would pay Phase 1 costs. They would also be part of groups that would work alongside Rocky Mountain Power in designing utility programs.

Until now, 15 local governments joined the interlocal agreement to activate HB411. Salt Lake City, Summit County, Grand County, Moab, Millcreek, Park City and Castle Valley have signed and made additional voluntary payments to help fund these implementation costs, which total approximately $700,000. Alta, Cottonwood Heights, Francis, Holladay, Kearns, Ogden, Salt Lake County and Springdale are also participating in the second stage of the process.

Eight other communities that initially adopted the project have not committed to continue – even though they have been eligible since passing resolutions supporting 100% renewable electricity for their communities by 2030.

West Valley City, the second most populous city in the state, is one of them, along with Bluffdale, Coalville, Emigration Canyon Township, Kamas, Oakley, Orem and West Jordan.

Cost remains a concern

(Chris Samuels | The Salt Lake Tribune) West Valley City Hall, Thursday, February 10, 2022.

After two years of talks, a change of mayor and two council seats — and even with a new deadline that would allow the city to register by May 31 — the city seems unlikely to sign and go. his first Payment of $47,899.22 for stage 1.

A major concern is the impact the switch to clean energy would have on the city’s low-income residents.

City Manager Wayne Pyle recommended that City Council not take the next step to register with the Community Renewable Energy Act. He warned that the city would not be able to control its own destiny once committed to the plan.

“You are a small part of the whole,” he said.

“We are always skeptical and look closely at any new organization before joining,” Pyle said. “My main big concern with Bill 411 is that I have 140,000 residents here, and what they are proposing would include an indefinite financial burden on residents.”

The city council is still discussing the deal. If West Valley City eventually signs on, residents would automatically be included in the clean energy switch. They can opt out by ticking a box on their electricity bill.

New mayor Karen Lang has doubts about the program.

“I don’t think we have enough solid information from Rocky Mountain as to what it would cost residents,” she said. “They just don’t have the details, or they don’t share them. And so I’m not comfortable engaging our residents in anything without all the information.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) West Valley City Mayor Karen Lang at her home on Wednesday, Dec. 8, 2021. She is suspicious of the city’s commitment to an interlocal renewable energy deal.

There is no precise prediction as to the increase in energy prices. A study 2017 found that with this program, “rates would be 9% to 14% higher in 2032 for communities compared to the status quo”. Since then, solar prices decreased by about 25%Utah 100 Communities, the agency administering the program, said on its website.

Go it alone

(Chris Samuels | The Salt Lake Tribune) A UTA bus picks up passengers in West Valley City, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2022.

Advocates of the program argue that this represents a rare opportunity to achieve a key environmental goal. Electricity is one of the biggest sources of carbon emissions nationwide, and this program has the potential to dramatically reduce them and make clean energy accessible to people who can’t afford it. initial investment in solar panels and other energy efficiency tools.

“This program is not coming back. This opportunity is not something there is a political appetite to recreate,” said Sierra Club campaign representative Lindsay Beebe. “It took huge political capital to create this in the first place. And it is currently the only program in Utah, and also in the country, that allows cities to achieve 100% renewable energy by 2030.”

For his part, Pyle doubts that West Valley City is missing an opportunity. The city, he said, is working towards the same goal of 100% clean energy by 2030 on its own.

The city moved to four-day work weeks for its employees in the early 2000s, for example, and converted part of its fleet to hybrid vehicles, including cars for police detectives.

(Chris Samuels | The Salt Lake Tribune) West Valley City Police Department Headquarters, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2022.

“We invested $1 million in federal partnerships for emissions reduction efforts that would result in energy efficiency improvements here at City Hall,” Pyle said. “We did the same thing at the Family Fitness Center. It’s a 100,000 square foot facility. We’ve done it at the Maverik Center, indoors, and we’re working on the exterior, to get the lights to fit into an all-LED structure up there.

The city approves 400 residential rooftop solar projects a year, according to Pyle, and has raised about 4,500 in total. He estimates that this type of action will accelerate and continue over the next eight years.

“We are not perfect. We’re not there yet,” Pyle said. “But we have accelerated and are making great strides in that direction.”

Carmen Valdez, political associate at the environmental nonprofit Heal Utahdiscussed the program with city officials and worked with businesses to encourage them to advocate for HB411.

Valdez said government officials need to know that being part of the interlocal agreement doesn’t mean they’re tied to a program they can’t control.

“What we’re hoping for is that they see that by becoming a member of the committee and the board of directors that come up with this plan and bring it to Rocky Mountain Power,” she said, “you can actually make sure any concerns you have are addressed and include things like making sure there are opportunities for utility expansion in terms of local source power.

Alixel Cabrera is a Report for America member of the corps and writes about the status of communities on the west side of the Salt Lake Valley for the Salt Lake Tribune. Your donation to match our RFA grant helps him keep writing stories like this; please consider making a tax deductible donation of any amount today by clicking here.

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Salt lake city government

Park City area leaders set to hold first major joint Winter Olympics bid discussion

Utah’s Olympic Park during the 2002 Winter Olympics.
Park Record File Photo

Park City and Summit County leaders are set to meet next week for a major rally centered on the prospects for hosting a second Winter Olympics in the state, a discussion that will take place just steps from the track bobsleigh and ski jumps where athletes would compete in a future Games.

This will be the first time Park City Council and Summit County Council have met jointly to discuss Olympic efforts. High-ranking officials from the Salt Lake City-Utah Games Committee seeking to stage an Olympics must address elected officials.

Both Park City and Summit County are crucial to the Olympic talks. Two major competition venues – Park City Mountain Resort and Deer Valley Resort – are identified within Park City while another – Utah Olympic Park – is in unincorporated Summit County, just outside the Park City limits. The area would also be key in the overall planning for transport, security and Games celebrations.



Elected officials from each of the jurisdictions would play a key role if an Olympics were awarded to Salt Lake City as City Hall and the County Courthouse prepare for the Games. They would be heavily involved in working out the details of Olympic operations, would have to review various Games-related contractual matters, and would likely be heavily involved in public relations efforts.

Fraser Bullock, who is the president and CEO of the Salt Lake City-Utah Committee for the Games, and the organization’s president, Catherine Raney Norman, are scheduled to appear at Tuesday’s meeting. Colin Hilton, who is the president and CEO of the Utah Olympic Legacy Foundation, is also to address elected officials. Hilton serves on the board of the Salt Lake City-Utah Committee for the Games and was a key staff member of the committee that organized the 2002 Winter Olympics. Two consultants, one involved in communication and the other in calls for tenders for major events, must also appear alongside the committee’s personalities.



The meeting will be the first such organized discussion between a committee team and local government leaders and will be held as efforts are expected to ramp up. The International Olympic Committee will likely turn its attention to selecting a host for the 2030 Winter Olympics after the Beijing Games conclude later this month. A timeline is unclear, but the 2030 event is almost certain to be the next awarded.

“Things are getting more serious now about the potential for an offer,” Hilton said in an interview as he spoke about the timing of the meeting with Park City and Summit County officials.

Hilton said the committee’s numbers intend to provide an update on progress to date on Tuesday and discuss “collective thoughts for the future” with elected officials. The committee wants to hear more about Olympic aspirations and concerns from Park City and Summit County leaders.

It seems likely that the discussion will be general in nature rather than the start of a detailed conversation about the roles and responsibilities of the different parties. But it’s also likely that the discussion could begin to set the tone for the committee’s relationship with local governments. There were early tensions between the Organizing Committee and Park City area leaders in the years leading up to the 2002 Games that the parties want to avoid.

The meeting is scheduled as the region marks the 20th anniversary of the 2002 Olympics and encourages local athletes to compete in Beijing. A big anniversary celebration is planned for Park City on Saturday. The United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee, which in 2018 selected Salt Lake City as its National Candidate City for the Winter Olympics, opened a temporary location along Main Street for the Beijing Games.

Tuesday’s meeting is scheduled for 2 p.m. in the Quinney Conference Room at Utah Olympic Park. This is a public meeting and will be streamed online. More information and a link to the online broadcast can be found on City Hall’s website, parkcity.org. The direct link is: parkcity.org/Home/Components/Calendar/Event/38627/15.

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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City officer justified in shooting suicidal man, prosecutors say

Navada Escholt shot three officers, police said. He later died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

(Salt Lake City Police Department) Body camera footage shows Officers Benzon (left) and Abel Bromley (right) standing outside Navada Escholt’s apartment on July 20, 2021, moments before Escholt doesn’t shoot officers. Bromley fired back but missed. Escholt later died of a self-inflicted gunshot, police said.

A Salt Lake City officer who shot a suicidal man after the man opened fire on police last July will not face criminal charges, prosecutors said Friday.

Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said officer Abel Bromley reasonably believed — as Utah law stipulates — that he and other officers were in imminent danger after the man , Navada Escholt, shot them.

Bromley returned a single shot, which did not hit Escholt. Escholt, 42, shot himself shortly afterwards, according to Gill’s discovery letter.

Three officers – Bromley and two others, identified only as “Dunn” and “Benzon” – responded to Escholt’s apartment near 1600 West and 800 North on July 20, just after noon. Escholt’s wife had called police to say he was suicidal, had a gun and needed an ambulance, the letter said. She told police that Escholt had been drinking and had not taken her prescription medication.

Officers knocked on the door of Escholt and others in the apartment complex and tried to call Escholt. When no one responded, officers moved about 90 feet from the apartments to the sidewalk, Gill said.

Dunn called Escholt’s wife and asked if she could try to talk to Escholt. He said the officers did not want to force their way inside and escalate the situation.

During that phone call, Escholt opened his front door and fired a single shot at officers who took cover. Bromley fought back from behind a tree. Dunn and Benzon pulled up behind a truck in a neighbor’s driveway.

Escholt fired about 20 minutes after officers arrived. Shortly after that first volley of fire, Escholt apparently shot himself in his apartment.

Officers learned he later died after sending a police robot into the house and finding Escholt in a bedroom.

Escholt had been charged earlier in the day with witness tampering and retaliation. He was being investigated for aggravated assault and allegedly sent threatening messages on Facebook to someone involved in the case. His wife told investigators he had recently lost his job and was suffering from a “nervous breakdown”.

Gill praised the “incredible restraint” of the officers, noting that they tried to contact Escholt several times and kept their distance from the apartment to buy time and defuse the difficult scene. Gill said they had to deal with multiple concerns at once – the cares of the caller, an armed person in mental health crisis and an apartment complex with “people and thin walls”.

Gill said officials could do more to ensure people with mental health needs receive adequate treatment, and that police could receive more training for situations involving people going through such crises.

“But unfortunately tragedy happens because sometimes the people who are hurting can also escalate into a really violent situation, and then we have to respond as law enforcement to protect everyone else as well,” Gill said.

(Paighten Harkins | The Salt Lake Tribune) Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill reviews body camera footage during a news conference on Feb. 11, 2022. Gill ruled that an SLCPD officer was legally justified in shooting Navada Escholt after Escholt shot officers on July 20, 2021.

All three agents from Salt Lake City were certified in crisis intervention.

A Salt Lake Tribune analysis of a decade of police shooting data found that more than 40% of police shootings in the state involved someone in mental health crisis. More than half of those cases involved someone with a gun, and 80% of those cases involved someone who was suicidal.

The shooting marked the 17th in Utah in 2021. Police shot 31 people last year, surpassing the previous record of 30 police shootings, which was set in 2018 and tied in 2020. Records show more more officers have been shot at least a year than in recent history.

Editor’s note If you or people you know are at risk of self-harm, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides 24-hour assistance at 1-800-273-8255.

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Salt lake city government

Feds dismiss lawsuit against BYU over school’s treatment of LGBTQ students

This is not the outcome that LGBTQ students had hoped for.

After months of investigation, the US Department of Education has dismissed a complaint filed against Brigham Young University over the private religious school’s treatment of its gay students.

In a letter this week, investigators said the school was rightly exempt from federal laws prohibiting gender discrimination. The university will be allowed to continue disciplining those who break its rules prohibiting same-sex relations.

“I wanted to believe something would come out of it,” said Madi Hawes, a BYU sophomore who is bisexual. “I had hope, but that was it, hope.”

Disappointment spread through the LGBTQ student community on Thursday. Many saw the move as the latest in a string of recent events they see as targeting those who are gay at the school, run by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Some said on Twitter that they don’t know how to move forward now. A few said the decision brought them to tears.

Hawes added: “We knew the church, and therefore our school, was OK to discriminate against us. But now the government has approved it. We do not agree.

BYU, however, released a statement on Thursday, announcing the decision to drop the investigation. He said he had foreseen that he would be absolved. And some joined in patting the school on the back for what they saw as a victory. That includes U.S. Senator Mike Lee, R-Utah, who defended the decision on Twitter as a triumph for “religious freedom and higher education”.

The school said the dismissal affirms “the freedom to operate a religious university without sacrificing distinctive religious beliefs.”

Federal investigators were first alerted to a possible problem at the school after a complaint was filed in response to changes to the school’s strict honor code in the spring of 2020.

At the time, the university removed a controversial section of the rules that prohibited “homosexual behavior”. Some students celebrated, coming out openly queer after, they said, some school officials told them it was OK. But a few weeks later, the school clarified that same-sex partnerships would still be banned, even though the prohibition was no longer expressly written.

Those who act against this instruction by holding hands or kissing, according to the administrators, could continue to be sanctioned. LGBTQ students protested, with some saying they felt cheated into coming out.

The investigation, led by the Office of Civil Rights within the Department of Education, sought to determine whether such actions by BYU are permitted because it is a private school or whether they violate the rights of LGBTQ students, disciplining them more harshly than their heterosexual peers. who do not suffer the same consequences for similar romantic behavior.

The department’s letter said that because BYU had 15 approved exemptions to Title IX, the federal law that protects against gender discrimination in schools, it was acting within its rights. Investigators also noted that as such they had no authority to investigate further.

They ended the letter by noting that BYU cannot “harass, coerce, intimidate, discriminate against, or retaliate against any individual” who filed the complaint. They also said the school could still face federal prosecution, even if a violation was not found.

LGBTQ student reaction

For many, the decision seems to be the end of the road.

“I don’t know how long we’ll let ‘religious freedom’ supersede gay rights,” said Zachary Ibarra, a gay Latter-day Saint who graduated from BYU in 2018. “I shouldn’t be surprised, but this is always deeply disappointing. When will the rights of gay students be respected by law without exception? »

Some had seen the federal inquiry as a chance for change and for gay students to be accepted into school.

This type of federal review is rare and usually only occurs in places where there are believed to be potential systemic or serious issues. The students say they believed it was happening at BYU and expected the government to intervene to end the discrimination.

Now, they say, they are disappointed but not surprised.

“The Department of Education’s decision is almost as heartbreaking as BYU’s coordinated campaign against its gay students,” said Cal Burke, a recent BYU student who is gay.

Last year, a professor publicly referred to Burke as a Book of Mormon term associated with an antichrist. The school declined to say whether it would take action against the teacher. He thinks BYU picks and chooses what it wants to enforce, creating an especially difficult environment for LGBTQ students who don’t know if they’ll be reported for something minor.

But Burke said Thursday he did not plan to end the fight.

“We gay students will never give up because we are right and God is on our side,” he said. “We will not give up until all gay Latter-day Saints are free, safe, and loved.”

(Isaac Hale | Special for The Tribune) People join in for a Utah Pride Week party on Sunday, June 6, 2021.

The investigation into BYU, which was officially opened in October last year, came after the school has repeatedly been in the national spotlight over the past two years for its treatment of LGBTQ students. and which many have rejected.

Last year, several students signed a lawsuit, alleging they were discriminated against because of their identity. And a group of students spoke out against the school’s policy by lighting up the iconic “Y” on the mountain above BYU in rainbow colors.

In response, the university has now banned protests on that property.

And, last fall, a high-ranking LDS Church apostle came to campus and criticized faculty members and students who challenge the faith’s teachings on same-sex marriage. Leader Jeffrey Holland said they should instead take up their intellectual “muskets” to uphold “the doctrine of the family and…marriage as a union of one man and one woman”.

It’s been a back-and-forth that Burke says won’t end with this decision by federal investigators.

Hawes also added, “It’s not an exemption from a privilege like scholarships or internship opportunities, it’s an exemption from the human right to a safe environment.” And she plans to continue to raise this concern.

Religious exemptions

The Salt Lake Tribune submitted a public records request for a copy of the complaint and other documents. That’s still pending, but in response, a department official called the school’s investigation “extensive” and “systemic,” saying there were hundreds of pages of documents collected.

It is unclear what was collected by investigators and why so much was invested in an investigation that was quickly closed. The Ministry of Education only confirmed on Thursday that the case had been closed.

While glad it was opened, attorney Paul Southwick guessed it wouldn’t amount to any action against BYU.

Southwick is the director of the Religious Exemption Accountability Project, which is leading the lawsuit against BYU and other religious schools on Title IX. They are pushing for private schools not to have exemptions from the law as long as they accept federal funding, which BYU does with student grants and loans.

He said he has seen other cases in religious schools that were quickly closed because they have exemptions.

On Thursday, he called the result “disappointing and difficult for students hoping for help from their government, but not unexpected in light of the broad religious exemption that is part of Title IX.”

(George Frey | Special for The Tribune) Students and others gather outside the Ernest L. Wilkinson Student Center on the Brigham Young University campus to protest BYU’s reversal of a recently announced policy change on LGBTQ students on March 5, 2020, in Prov.

BYU began receiving Title IX religious exemptions in 1976, becoming the first school to do so and leading the charge for private universities across the country to follow.

In a strongly worded letter to the then-Department of Education, then-BYU President Dallin Oaks bristled at the fact that the federal government had the power to control or limit BYU, according to an article on Title IX in Higher Education from the Kansas Law Review.

These exemptions continue to apply at BYU today, among 15 total exemptions the school has now related to sexuality and gender expression.

Its protected actions include the ability to enforce its own preferences when recruiting and admitting students and granting financial aid. For example, if a student is openly gay, BYU is allowed by law to deny them a scholarship. The school may also limit toilet use based on the sex assigned at birth.

In its Thursday statement, BYU noted, “Title IX also states that it ‘does not apply’ to a religious institution to the extent that the requirements of Title IX are inconsistent with the organization’s religious principles. nun who controls the institution. BYU has long recognized that it is subject to Title IX, and over the years the OCR has recognized the university’s religious exemption on certain matters.

‘Agree to respect’

The university’s current president, Kevin Worthen, had written in a letter to the Department of Education last November, shortly after receiving the notice of investigation, that all students were held to the same honor code.

“All BYU students, faculty, administrators, and staff,” he wrote, “agree to the honor code of the Church’s educational system and thereby ‘voluntarily pledge to lead their lives in accordance with the principles of the gospel of Jesus Christ”.

Removing the section on “homosexual behavior” in February 2020 does not matter. The rule can still be enforced, he said. It was supported by the dismissal of the complaint.

The school president also wrote that he cannot be forced to implement policies “that contradict the doctrine of the Church of Jesus Christ concerning the distinction between men and women, the eternal nature of gender or God’s laws of chastity and marriage”.

He says the school will welcome and support all students, including those who are LGBTQ, as long as they “agree to live by the principles of The Church of Jesus Christ.”

(Chris Detrick | The Salt Lake Tribune) BYU Chairman Kevin J. Worthen speaks at the Marriott Center Thursday, April 21, 2016.

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Salt lakes real estate

Deal Digest: AM sold in Dallas, Atlanta and Miami. | story

STATION SALES

Miami-Ft. Lauderdale — Marc Paskin’s Marco Broadcasting has filed a $1.25 million deal to buy commercial “Money Talk Radio” talk show WWNN (1470) from Beasley Media Group. The deal also includes translator W237BD licensed in Boca Raton, FL at 95.3, and translator W245BC licensed in Lauderdale Lakes, FL at 96.9. Beasley does not have any other stations on the market. Paskin is a millionaire real estate developer from San Diego, best known for appearing on ABC-TV’s “Secret Millionaire” reality show. He currently has no other radio station assets. His company previously operated KXXP White Salmon, WA (104.5) under an LMA with then-station owner Sebago Broadcasting. Previously owned the old KBUD Denver (1550). Broker: Hadden & Associates

Dallas-Ft. Value –Jon Garrett has filed a $1.05 million deal to buy the KBEC country classic (1390) from James and Ann Phillips. The deal also includes licensed translator Waxahachie, TX K256DE at 99.1 FM. Garrett does not own any other stations. Broker: Dave Manchee

Roanoke-Lynchburg, Virginia — Gary Burns’ 3 Daughters Media has filed a $325,000 deal to buy Todd Robinson’s classic hits “Oldies 103.9” WHTU. The deal includes a $300,000 promissory note. Burns will operate WHTU under a local marketing agreement until closing. It already has three stations in the market, including talk WIQO (100.9), news-talk WGMN (1240). and WVGM sports (1320). Robinson earlier sold most of its stations in the Roanoke-Lynchburg market to Mel Wheeler Inc. for $330,000. Once the sale of WHTU closes, it will leave Robinson with the adult alternative “The Mountain 101.5” WVMP.

Salt Lake City –Iglesia Pentecostal Vispera del Fin has filed a $300,000 deal to buy KWLO, Springville, UT (1580) from Brantley Broadcast Associates. The deal also includes the Provo, UT K260DS-licensed translator at 99.9 FM. The sale includes a $250,000 promissory note. Iglesia Pentecostal Vispera del Fin will operate KWLO under a time-to-closing brokerage agreement. The religious broadcaster also entered into a separate $25,000 deal to buy KPVO, Fountain Green, UT (99.9) from Brantley Broadcast Associates. The stations will become the first in Utah for Iglesia Pentecostal Vispera del Fin.

Portland, OR –Jacqueline Smith-Crittenden has filed a $250,000 deal to buy Cindy Wyant Smith’s talk show KSLM (1220) in a rare mother-daughter radio deal. The transfer also includes the Salem licensed translator, OR K282BY at 104.3 FM. The record indicates that the purchase price was paid in sweat equity. Smith-Crittenden is currently Managing Director of KSLM.

Louisiana — Ericka Taylor has filed a $175,000 deal to buy classic hits WABL, Amite, LA (1570) from Second Line Media. The deal also includes licensed translator Amite, LA K247BJ at 97.3 FM. Taylor does not own any other stations.

Indiana — George and Della Mammarella have filed a $149,270 deal to buy hot AC “K-99.3” WKVI-FM, Knox, IN; classic hits “Max 98.3” WYMR, Culver, IN; and “All News AM 1520” WKVI, Knox, IN from Kankakee Valley Broadcasting Co.

Atlanta — Hispanic Family Christian Network has filed a $35,000 deal to purchase the currently silent WAZX (1550) from Intelli. Atlanta is a new market for Dallas-based Hispanic Family Christian Network, which has 14 other full-strength stations and several translators, mostly in Texas.

TRANSLATOR SALES

New York — Seven Mountains Media has filed a one-dollar deal to purchase Wellsville, NY-licensed translator W267DF at 101.3 FM from Family Life Ministries. Translator simulcasts Seven Mountain Media country “95.7 The Pig” WPIG-FM, which he acquired in a three-way deal last year with the Ministries of Family Life and Sound Communications.

CLOSURES

Ohio –Brent and Danielle Selhorst’s Buzzards Media have reached a $1.3 million deal to buy AC WCSM-FM (96.7) and WCSM Adult Standards (1350) in Celina, OH from Hayco Broadcasting of John and Claudia Coe . The deal also includes licensed translator Celina, OH W262DC at 100.3 FM. The deal includes $1.01 million in vendor financing. Brent Selhorst has been WCSM’s Director of Programs for eight years. He also hosts the station’s morning show.

Texas – Tiffiny Spearman and Kristi Spearman’s Zulu Com have reached a $300,000 deal to buy KYYK Country (98.3) and KNET Talk (1450) in Palestine, TX from Tomlinson-Leis Communications. The deal also includes licensed translator Palestine, TX K239AM at 95.7 FM which simulcasts KNET. Vendor Edward Tomlinson does not own any other stations. Broker: Bill Whitley, Media Services Group

North Dakota – Wes Glass’ GlassWorks Broadcasting has reached a $200,000 deal to buy AC “The Mix 105.7” KDXN, South Heart, ND from Totally Amped. The sale includes a $160,000 promissory note.

Colorado — Roaring Fork Broadcasting has reached a $175,000 deal to purchase two stations and four FM translators from BS&T Wireless in the Aspen area. Stations include CHR “Hot 100.5” KGHT and classic hits “Thunder 93.5” KTND. Translators include the Old Snowmass, licensed CO K226BV at 93.1 FM; the Glenwood Springs, under CO license K226CD at 93.1 FM; and the Aspen, CO-licensed K226BU at 93.1 – all three simultaneously broadcasting KGHT. The fourth translator is Aspen, licensed CO K261EG at 100.1 FM which simulcasts KTND. The deal includes a $130,000 promissory note.

Florida – South of Tallahassee, East Bay Broadcasting of Lena and Michael Allen has reached a $160,000 deal to buy the WOCY variety, Carrabelle, FL (106.5) from Live Communications. The deal includes a $142,500 promissory note. East Bay Broadcasting already owns the former “Oyster Radio 100.5” WOYS, Apalachicola, FL. It has operated WOCY under a local marketing agreement since March 2021. Live Communications still owns gospel WTAL (1450) in the Tallahassee market.

Greensboro-Winston-Salem-High Point, North Carolina –The Delmarva Educational Association has reached a $100,000 deal to buy “The Light” gospel WEAL (1510) from Truth Broadcasting. With the sale, Truth Broadcasting still owns “The Cross” gospel WPET (950) and “The Light” gospel WPOL/WKEW (1340/1400) in the Greensboro-Winston-Salem-High Point market.

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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City’s Nathan Chen Wins Olympic Gold Medal

BEJING (AP) — Utah’s Nathan Chen wasn’t going to be disallowed this time at the Olympics.

Chen completed his four-year journey to an elusive Olympic gold medal on Thursday, following his record-breaking short program at the Beijing Games with a near-perfect free skate that earned him a standing ovation from fans inside the historic Beijing Stadium. the capital.

The 22-year-old star, who grew up in Salt Lake City, landed all five of his quads during his ‘Rocketman’ program, set to the soaring film score of Elton John, to finish with 332.60 points – at just three shy of his own world record — and becomes the first American champion since Evan Lysacek took the top step of the podium in 2010 in Vancouver.

Chen’s score easily edged out his two closest pursuers, Japan’s Yuma Kagiyama and Shoma Uno, and put all lingering memories of his brutal disappointment four years ago in Pyeongchang firmly in the past.

This may not be the last gold medal Chen wins either.

The Americans, who took silver behind Russia in the team event on Monday, were awaiting confirmation from the IOC and the International Skating Union that the “legal issues” delaying the medal ceremony were related to doping information linked to their biggest star, Kamila Valieva. This could ultimately elevate the United States to the gold medal.

Chen did his part for Team USA with a winning short program, and Vincent Zhou – who was forced to withdraw from the individual event due to a positive COVID-19 test – would also win a gold medal. for his free skating.

The suave and down-to-earth Chen and his two Japanese chasers separated themselves from the rest of the field during their short programs, when Chen smashed the world record with a flawless performance at “La Bohème”. When they took to the ice for the free skate, Kagiyama and Uno made just enough mistakes to pave the way for Chen’s crowning glory.

Playing to “Bolero”, one of the most popular musical selections from the Beijing Games, Uno under-spinned a quad salchow and quad toe loop, then was stunned for his combined spin late in the program to finish with 293 points.

Then it was 18-year-old Kagiyama, who was playing to the music for the movie “Gladiator,” who pulled out his triple toe curl and triple salchow. It was still enough to score 310.05 points and earn a punch in the kissing and crying zone, but not enough to add pressure on Chen, who calmly skated on the placid ice as the score from Kagiyama was read.

With a socially distanced crowd watching Thursday afternoon in Beijing and millions watching at home on late-night television, the young Yale student soared in his first quad salchow. Chen landed four more quads effortlessly, with his only slight bobble coming on a late combination streak. He couldn’t wipe the smile from his face as the music ended.

He bathed in the spotlight in the middle of the ice, then left to listen to his scores, which were then a mere formality. Once they were read, Chen’s longtime trainer, Rafael Arutyunyan, raised Chen’s arm like a triumphant boxer.

While the spotlight shone like never before on Chen, it seemed to fade for his longtime Japanese rival.

Yuzuru Hanyu arrived in Beijing aiming to become the first male skater since Gillis Grafstrom in 1928 to win a third consecutive Olympic gold medal. But after missing most of last year with an ankle injury, the 27-year-old struggled to keep up with his short program on Tuesday, essentially putting him out of contention for a medal.

All Hanyu was left with was a free kick on the quadruple axis, a 4 1/2 turn jump that has never been successful in competition. He got close, but couldn’t quite hold on on the landing, then fell back onto his quad salchow before an emotional end to what could be his last performance on Olympic ice.

His score places him fourth, behind his two teammates.

And, of course, behind the new American champion.

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Salt lakes real estate

Deal Digest – February 10, 2022 | Summary of transactions

STATION SALES

Miami-Ft. Lauderdale — Marc Paskin’s Marco Broadcasting has filed a $1.25 million deal to buy commercial “Money Talk Radio” talk show WWNN (1470) from Beasley Media Group. The deal also includes translator W237BD licensed in Boca Raton, FL at 95.3, and translator W245BC licensed in Lauderdale Lakes, FL at 96.9. Beasley does not have any other stations on the market. Paskin is a millionaire real estate developer from San Diego, best known for appearing on ABC-TV’s “Secret Millionaire” reality show. He currently has no other radio station assets. His company previously operated KXXP White Salmon, WA (104.5) under an LMA with then-station owner Sebago Broadcasting. Previously owned the old KBUD Denver (1550). Broker: Hadden & Associates

Dallas-Ft. Value –Jon Garrett has filed a $1.05 million deal to buy the KBEC country classic (1390) from James and Ann Phillips. The deal also includes licensed translator Waxahachie, TX K256DE at 99.1 FM. Garrett does not own any other stations. Broker: Dave Manchee

Roanoke-Lynchburg, Virginia — Gary Burns’ 3 Daughters Media has filed a $325,000 deal to buy Todd Robinson’s classic hits “Oldies 103.9” WHTU. The deal includes a $300,000 promissory note. Burns will operate WHTU under a local marketing agreement until closing. It already has three stations in the market, including talk WIQO (100.9), news-talk WGMN (1240). and WVGM sports (1320). Robinson earlier sold most of its stations in the Roanoke-Lynchburg market to Mel Wheeler Inc. for $330,000. Once the sale of WHTU closes, it will leave Robinson with the adult alternative “The Mountain 101.5” WVMP.

Salt Lake City –Iglesia Pentecostal Vispera del Fin has filed a $300,000 deal to buy KWLO, Springville, UT (1580) from Brantley Broadcast Associates. The deal also includes the Provo, UT K260DS-licensed translator at 99.9 FM. The sale includes a $250,000 promissory note. Iglesia Pentecostal Vispera del Fin will operate KWLO under a time-to-closing brokerage agreement. The religious broadcaster also entered into a separate $25,000 deal to buy KPVO, Fountain Green, UT (99.9) from Brantley Broadcast Associates. The stations will become the first in Utah for Iglesia Pentecostal Vispera del Fin.

Portland, OR –Jacqueline Smith-Crittenden has filed a $250,000 deal to buy Cindy Wyant Smith’s talk show KSLM (1220) in a rare mother-daughter radio deal. The transfer also includes the Salem licensed translator, OR K282BY at 104.3 FM. The record indicates that the purchase price was paid in sweat equity. Smith-Crittenden is currently Managing Director of KSLM.

Louisiana — Ericka Taylor has filed a $175,000 deal to buy classic hits WABL, Amite, LA (1570) from Second Line Media. The deal also includes licensed translator Amite, LA K247BJ at 97.3 FM. Taylor does not own any other stations.

Indiana — George and Della Mammarella have filed a $149,270 deal to buy hot AC “K-99.3” WKVI-FM, Knox, IN; classic hits “Max 98.3” WYMR, Culver, IN; and “All News AM 1520” WKVI, Knox, IN from Kankakee Valley Broadcasting Co.

Atlanta — Hispanic Family Christian Network has filed a $35,000 deal to purchase the currently silent WAZX (1550) from Intelli. Atlanta is a new market for Dallas-based Hispanic Family Christian Network, which has 14 other full-strength stations and several translators, mostly in Texas.

TRANSLATOR SALES

New York — Seven Mountains Media has filed a one-dollar deal to purchase Wellsville, NY-licensed translator W267DF at 101.3 FM from Family Life Ministries. Translator simulcasts Seven Mountain Media country “95.7 The Pig” WPIG-FM, which he acquired in a three-way deal last year with the Ministries of Family Life and Sound Communications.

CLOSURES

Ohio –Brent and Danielle Selhorst’s Buzzards Media have reached a $1.3 million deal to buy AC WCSM-FM (96.7) and WCSM Adult Standards (1350) in Celina, OH from Hayco Broadcasting of John and Claudia Coe . The deal also includes licensed translator Celina, OH W262DC at 100.3 FM. The deal includes $1.01 million in vendor financing. Brent Selhorst has been WCSM’s Director of Programs for eight years. He also hosts the station’s morning show.

Texas – Tiffiny Spearman and Kristi Spearman’s Zulu Com have reached a $300,000 deal to buy KYYK Country (98.3) and KNET Talk (1450) in Palestine, TX from Tomlinson-Leis Communications. The deal also includes licensed translator Palestine, TX K239AM at 95.7 FM which simulcasts KNET. Vendor Edward Tomlinson does not own any other stations. Broker: Bill Whitley, Media Services Group

North Dakota – Wes Glass’ GlassWorks Broadcasting has reached a $200,000 deal to buy AC “The Mix 105.7” KDXN, South Heart, ND from Totally Amped. The sale includes a $160,000 promissory note.

Colorado — Roaring Fork Broadcasting has reached a $175,000 deal to purchase two stations and four FM translators from BS&T Wireless in the Aspen area. Stations include CHR “Hot 100.5” KGHT and classic hits “Thunder 93.5” KTND. Translators include the Old Snowmass, licensed CO K226BV at 93.1 FM; the Glenwood Springs, under CO license K226CD at 93.1 FM; and the Aspen, CO-licensed K226BU at 93.1 – all three simultaneously broadcasting KGHT. The fourth translator is Aspen, licensed CO K261EG at 100.1 FM which simulcasts KTND. The deal includes a $130,000 promissory note.

Florida – South of Tallahassee, East Bay Broadcasting of Lena and Michael Allen has reached a $160,000 deal to buy the WOCY variety, Carrabelle, FL (106.5) from Live Communications. The deal includes a $142,500 promissory note. East Bay Broadcasting already owns the former “Oyster Radio 100.5” WOYS, Apalachicola, FL. It has operated WOCY under a local marketing agreement since March 2021. Live Communications still owns gospel WTAL (1450) in the Tallahassee market.

Greensboro-Winston-Salem-High Point, North Carolina –The Delmarva Educational Association has reached a $100,000 deal to buy “The Light” gospel WEAL (1510) from Truth Broadcasting. With the sale, Truth Broadcasting still owns “The Cross” gospel WPET (950) and “The Light” gospel WPOL/WKEW (1340/1400) in the Greensboro-Winston-Salem-High Point market.

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Salt lake city government

Today’s local Utah news headlines – Tuesday evening, February 8, 2022

Tuesday, February 8, 2022

State

Utah Cannabinoid Product Board takes a look at delta-8 THC

Some patient advocates are sounding the alarm about a cannabis ingredient because of its potential health effects. Delta-8 THC is a naturally occurring substance in cannabis that appears in small amounts. While it can still get you high, it’s less powerful than the better known Delta-9. But federal regulators have not yet studied or approved delta 8. Dr. Perry Fine of the Utah Cannabinoid Product Board said at this time that they “do not support any therapeutic use of analog cannabis products.” The council plans to work with state legislators and the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food moving forward. Read the full story. — Ivana Martinez

Governor Spencer Cox tries his hand at substitute teaching

Utah Governor Spencer Cox tried his hand at something a little different on Tuesday. coxswain tweeted he was working as a substitute teacher for three periods of 8th grade history and said “pray for me”. The teaching dive comes about a week after he approved 30 hours of paid leave for state employees in an effort to help with Utah’s surrogate shortage amid the ongoing pandemic. Health officials announced just 1,300 cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday. That’s down from 6,600 two weeks ago. — Ross Terrell

Northern Utah

Prominent LDS Church leader apologizes for race comments

A prominent leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is under fire for controversial statements. Speaking at a youth meeting on Sunday, Brad Wilcox, counselor in the Young Men General Presidency, commented on the faith’s old ban on black people holding the priesthood. “Maybe instead of saying why black people had to wait until 1978,” he said, “maybe we should ask why white people and other races had to wait until 1829?” The Church teaches that the priesthood was then restored to Joseph Smith. Wilcox apologized Monday night on Facebook, saying his post “did NOT go through” as he intended. Wilcox’s employer, Brigham Young University, released a statement on Twitter, saying they are “deeply concerned” by what he said but believe he will learn from it. — Lexi Peery

Salt Lake City native sets Olympic world record

Salt Lake City native Nathan Chen set a world record Monday at the Beijing Winter Olympics. Now he is one good free skate away from an Olympic gold medal. The figure skater earned a score of 113.97 in the men’s short program. This is more than two points higher than the previous record. Chen struggled in his short program at the 2018 Winter Olympics and placed fifth overall. He will go for the Olympic title live in prime time on Wednesday night. — Caroline Ballard

Utah hospital faces Medicare penalties over performance metrics

Six Utah hospitals — located in Sandy, Layton, Logan, Ogden and Riverton — are in the works penalized by health insurance for high complication rates in patients according to data from Kaiser Health News. The Affordable Care Act allows the federal government to reduce small amounts of funding for high readmission rates or patient injuries. All six hospitals in the state will see a 1% reduction in Medicare payments through the end of the fiscal year. Twenty Utah hospitals were also penalized due to high readmission rates. These discounts can cost up to 3% per patient. — Ross Terrell

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Salt lake city

Why the West Side’s political clout may increase in Salt Lake City

Victoria Petro-Eschler has always been interested in politics, but when the smell of smoke from a burning chemical-coated railroad bridge engulfed her home west of Salt Lake City in 2021 and she found no official answer, she decided it was time to make Sequel.

It was time to act.

“I could see stuff falling from the sky. You could feel it in the air. People were having headaches,” she said. “I just realized that getting the city to connect with our neighborhood in a way we care about is a skill, it’s an art, and the city needed help with that.”

So she ran for the Salt Lake City Council District 1 seat, which includes Rose Park and Jordan Meadows, and won.

Like Petro-Eschler, many others also eyed the two city council seats on the West Side last fall. In the end, eight candidates — three in District 1 and five in District 2 — were on the November ballot.

(Chris Samuels | The Salt Lake Tribune) Salt Lake City Councilwoman Victoria Petro-Eschler speaks at a press conference announcing a new ride-sharing service in conjunction with Salt Lake City and Utah Transit Authority for the west side of the city, Monday, Dec. 13, 2021.

This interest extended beyond political hopes to political donors.

In District 1, candidates raised $74,000 — a far cry from the millions racked up in some congressional races, but 13 times more than the $5,700 raised in 2017.

In District 2, which covers Fairpark, Glendale and Poplar Grove, contestants raised nearly $105,000, a whopping 850% jump from the $11,000 raised in 2019.

Various candidates emerge

Interest grew with no popularly elected incumbent seeking another term from the West Side.

District 1 Representative James Rodgers resigned in early October after already ruling out a third term. District 2 council member Andrew Johnston left in the spring to become the city’s director of homelessness policy and outreach. The board selected attorney Dennis Faris to fill this position. (Faris raced in the fall but failed to defeat eventual winner Alejandro Puy.)

This left the field open to a range of newcomers. New faces emerged from non-traditional backgrounds, often encouraged by specific organizations or individuals to come forward.

“A lot of people feel that we need to have a wider range of people running and getting elected,” said Matthew Burbank, a professor of political science at the University of Utah and a longtime Salt Lake City City Hall watcher. “And so I think there was a bit more value in having a diverse pool of applicants.”

The ranked voting system also eliminated the need for primaries and allowed candidates to continue running and raising funds until election day.

“As a result,” Burbank said, “I think what you’re likely to see is we’ll see more spending, given the nature of these types of elections.”

Voter turnout for District 1 has increased from 25% in 2017 to nearly 33%. Engagement has also increased, Petro-Eschler said, particularly on issues such as unresolved homelessness and soaring housing prices.

“There is optimism on the west side. And having choices makes people optimistic,” she said. “So now our job is to harness that optimism to remind those people that they are being heard.”

In District 2, however, turnout fell from 37% in 2019 to 29% last year.

“The municipal elections are difficult. It is sometimes difficult to hire certain people, especially in neighborhoods like mine where it is a popular neighborhood with a minority majority,” said Puy. “It’s not because people don’t care. It’s because of the challenges and barriers my community faces.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Alejandro Puy, District 2, says a few words after being sworn in as a member of the Salt Lake City Council, Monday, Jan. 3, 2022.

It was the political consultant’s first candidacy for public office. Puy prevailed after an exhaustive campaign that focused on knocking on doors and including Spanish speakers in the conversation.

One of his opponents, Nigel Swaby, who heads the Fairpark Community Council, doesn’t think there’s necessarily a growing interest in West Side politics. He credits the growth of fundraising to the ability to select new leaders without the challenge of incumbents. It also points to a demographic shift in the West Side neighborhoods.

“People who live here are wealthier than they were in the past because home values ​​have gone up so much,” Swaby said. “You have a lot of new blood, which will also increase participation, and that includes financially.”

Fears of gentrification

This real estate explosion leads to a new concern: gentrification.

“We have huge gentrification forces going on,” said Petro Eschler, who is also executive director of Salty Cricket Composers Collective, a cultural nonprofit. It can bring in new people to improve the fabric of West Side neighborhoods, she said. “But, if left unchecked, gentrification has left communities like mine in ruins and other towns.”

Puy, an Argentine-born and recently naturalized U.S. citizen who has made his understanding of the Latino community a guiding principle of his campaign, said he is seeing these neighborhood shifts — and not always for the better.

“A lot of Latin American families and minority families are moving out of the West Side because of gentrification and the cost of living,” he said. In a neighborhood where Hispanics often seek multigenerational homes, he added, the growing volume of small studio apartments won’t be enough.

“We have to work really hard to look where the city needs to look, because that’s where our families with kids are on the west side of Salt Lake City,” Puy said. “That’s where we have a disproportionate impact from the homeless shelter crisis that we have in our city. We still have some issues with crime.”

In the end, Salt Lake City has reached an important milestone: electing its most diverse city council in history. For the first time, most members (four out of seven) are racial and ethnic minorities. And, for the first time, a majority (four more) are openly LGBTQ.

What this historical diversity leads to City Hall remains to be seen. The trend of growing political interest on the West side, however, is set to continue with competition between candidates and potential challengers, according to Burbank in the United States, especially now that these new council members have shown the way. in the future. generations.

“Things that have motivated people to think about more diversity, to think about representing a wider range of people and on city council,” the political scientist said, “I don’t think that’s all going to go away.”

Salt Lake City Council. Top row, left to right: Ana Valdemoros; Amy Fowler; and Alexandre Puy. Center: Darin Mano. Bottom row, left to right: Chris Wharton; Dan Dugan; and Victoria Petro-Eschler.

Alixel Cabrera is a Report for America member of the corps and writes about the status of communities on the west side of the Salt Lake Valley for the Salt Lake Tribune. Your donation to match our RFA grant helps him keep writing stories like this; please consider making a tax deductible donation of any amount today by clicking here.

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Salt lake city government

Faced with a terminal illness, Kylie wanted to die with dignity. But the state said she had no right.

It’s time for Utah to pass a “Death with Dignity” law, writes Robert Gehrke, so that patients don’t have to suffer needlessly.

(Courtesy of Tammy Allred) A photo of Kylie Kaplinis from 2019. Kaplinis was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease three years ago. As the disease progressed, she made it clear to her family that she wanted a dignified death, but Utah state law prohibits assisted suicide. Her mother, Tammy Allred, is fighting to change that in her daughter’s honor through a bill in the Legislative Assembly.

About three years ago, Kylie Kaplinis was living the life of a normal 25-year-old, hanging out with friends, going dancing, hiking, hitting the gym and getting ready to start cosmetology school.

“He was my baby,” his mother, Tammy Allred, told me. “She was a great, amazing person. She brought a lot of light and happiness to everyone she touched.

Then one day, Kylie’s foot started hurting, like she had somehow twisted her ankle. When it didn’t improve, she went to doctor after doctor. They identified it as a probable neurological problem and performed test after test as the pain rose in his leg.

Kylie has lost the use of her foot. She had to use a cane, and later a walker.

She went to the Mayo Clinic in Arizona where they ordered all possible tests and concluded it could only be Lou Gehrig’s disease, known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS.

The neurodegenerative disease causes patients to lose muscle control, spreading throughout the body until the patient dies.

There is no cure and no effective treatment. Kaplinis had indeed been sentenced to death and she wanted out on her own terms, her mother said.

(Tammy Allred) A photo of Kylie Kaplinis on December 25, 2021. Kaplinis was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease three years ago. As the disease progressed, she made it clear to her family that she wanted a dignified death, but Utah state law prohibits assisted suicide. Her mother, Tammy Allred, is fighting to change that in her daughter’s honor through a bill in the Legislative Assembly.

“To sit there and cause her to lose her ability to use her legs, lose her ability to walk, lose her ability to use her hands,” Allred said, “she didn’t want to go through all those stages. She had a fine line that once she couldn’t use her arms and hands, she wanted to be completed. She wanted death with dignity.

Kaplinis had researched the issue even before his diagnosis and believed strongly in giving terminally ill patients a choice. When she learned of her own fate, Kaplinis told her mother that once she got to the point where she could no longer take care of herself, she wanted to end things.

But in Utah, it’s illegal for a doctor to prescribe drugs that would end a patient’s life. The legislature makes the ultimate decision about life or death, suffering or relief.

“She had been in a wheelchair for about a year and a half. It first took her legs and moved up into her arms and hands and she became pretty much a vegetable,” Allred said. “She wanted what was left of her dignity. She meant when she was done.

On January 20, at just 27 years old, Kylie passed away. A week later, her family buried her.

This week, Allred will be on Capitol Hill when HB74 — which would allow doctors to prescribe life-ending drugs when a terminally ill patient makes a clear, written request to end their life — is expected to get a legislative hearing.

“She should have had that opportunity and that comfort and relief of knowing it was in place if that’s what she chose to do,” Allred said. “She wanted it so badly.”

“I believe [I] to fight for this on her behalf, to be able to try and get this bill passed in her honor and in the honor of so many other people who should at least have a choice,” Kylie’s mother said.

The fight will not be easy. Similar legislation has been sponsored several times in the past. Former Rep. Rebecca Chavez-Houck has sponsored the measure previously and Rep. Jennifer Dailey-Provost, D-Salt Lake City has sponsored it three of the past four years. It didn’t go over well, and for the past few years it hasn’t been heard from.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Robert Gehrke.

This time it looks like it will, and Dailey-Provost said opponents are rallying against the measure again, but she hopes her colleague’s feelings have changed – as they have over time. in other states.

Currently, 10 states allow physician-assisted suicide. Three of them, including Colorado, were adopted by voters through a ballot initiative.

Since 1997, when Oregon passed the nation’s first “Death with Dignity” law, 1,905 people have chosen to end their lives through the program, according to data through 2020. So it’s not commonly used.

But for people with terminal illnesses – whether it’s an elderly person with cancer or a young one like Kylie – it gives those people some control in their final days.

“It’s important to know what you would do in this situation,” she said, “but to say it’s not an option to let people give up pain in a terminal situation is inhumane. .”

It’s inhumane. And for a legislature that likes to talk about the “proper role of government” and bodily autonomy (when it serves its purposes), it is cruel and wrong for the state to force a human being to suffer such immense pain and implacable.

It’s time to change that law and restore ultimate individual freedom and ease the suffering of the next Kylie Kaplinis.

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Salt lake city

Mary Cosby dubbed ‘the laughing stock of SLC’ after denying claims she was leaving The Real Housewives

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) — Real Housewives of Salt Lake City star Mary Cosby has been exposed after denying claims she was leaving the show after season 2.

A Article from page 6 revealed that Cosby “became the laughingstock of Salt Lake City” after calling a previous article Page 6 who pointed to his upcoming absence from the show as “a complete fabrication” and “a complete lie” in a Posting on Twitter.

In an interview with Page Six, a source revealed, “Mary seems like an idiot…It’s really confusing that Mary is even trying to shut him down on Twitter…Doesn’t she realize that the news was going to come out anyway once season 3 premiered and she was nowhere to be found?She didn’t film anything and the cast was told weeks ago that she wouldn’t be.

Although she makes waves on the show, Cosby’s unfiltered personality has led her to some controversy with her castmates.

Page Six revealed that Cosby was caught making numerous racist comments during RHOSLC season 2, comparing her co-star Jen Shaw to a “Mexican thug” and commenting on her “slanting eyes”. Jennie Nguyen.

According to Page Six, Cosby has also been accused of leading religious worship outside of her Pentecostal church, which she has denied.

Cosby opted out of the show’s Season 2 reunion, which the same source said Page Six “was the kiss of death for Mary.”

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Salt lake city government

House committee rejects earthquake preparedness bill

SALT LAKE CITY — A House committee has defeated a bill that would focus state resources on preparing for a major earthquake in Utah.

The House Government Operations Committee voted 9-2 against Rep. Claire Collard House Bill 100. This would create an earthquake preparedness office within the Utah Emergency Management Division, with two full-time staff.

“We have to be prepared. Preparation will help minimize losses of all kinds,” said Rep. Collard, D-Magna.

Rep. Collard said her motivations for the bill were after the epicenter of the 5.7 Magna earthquake in 2020. A Utah Emergency Management Authority representative testified that the funding state was still minimal for earthquake preparedness. They supported the bill.

“Utah’s path is being prepared and when it comes to earthquake preparedness, we are grossly underprepared,” Rep. Collard told the committee.

But Republicans on the committee voted against it, with some expressing concern for a $10.2 million funding request and why they needed to create a specific office for it, while the Emergency Management Division of the Utah now handles global readiness issues.

Rep. Collard said he would fund two new employees, as well as an earthquake awareness campaign and some projects. There are approximately 140,000 unreinforced structures in the state with over $1 billion in demand to make any earthquake safe.

“I kind of wonder the payback to make people aware of a problem they can’t solve,” said Rep. Norm Thurston, R-Provo, who said people are living in a situation “that ‘they can’t do anything.’

“I happen to believe that knowledge is power,” Rep. Collard replied, defending the request for funding.

Public comments, which included city council members, were supportive of the bill. Utah emergency preparedness officials have warned that an earthquake of magnitude 7.0 or greater could kill thousands and cause billions in economic damage to the state.

The Legislature is also considering a funding request for a study to determine if Utah could benefit from an earthquake warning system..

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Utah economy

Political and business trends threaten the future of outdoor entertainment

DENVER (AP) — A ski business owner leans against a wall with his skis, arranged to dazzle passers-by.

“What am I doing? I feel like I’m wasting my time,” Meier Skis owner Ted Eynon said. “Man, that ain’t what it used to be.”

The Outdoor Retailer Snow Show was just a shadow of its former self at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver last month. Perhaps a third of its size in 2019. The coronavirus is the easy scapegoat.

But historic schisms in the outdoor community are resurfacing and threatening to tear apart not just an event that, before the pandemic, drew tens of thousands of buyers, sellers and outdoor community leaders. The fight for the future of Outdoor Retailer threatens a vibrant outdoor community that influences national policy on public lands, climate and diversity.

As Denver negotiates a new long-term contract to keep Outdoor Retailer shows twice a year, Utah is courting the industry it lost in 2017 when outdoor leaders lambasted the state’s stance on public land and left the show’s 20-year-old home in Salt Lake City for Colorado.

These same outdoor businesses and community leaders continue to criticize Utah’s continued opposition to the restoration of the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments. Amid political clamor, pandemic upheaval, supply chain challenges and growing demand for outdoor recreation, the outdoor industry is fragmenting into divisive camps, threatening the carefully constructed unity that positioned the outdoor recreation community as a political and economic force capable of changing the country. Politics.

Major ski and snowboard brands have decamped to Outdoor Retailer for their own show in Utah. Winter sports enthusiasts say Salt Lake City is a third cheaper than Denver. Emerald X, the publicly traded owner of Outdoor Retailer that hosts 141 other conventions, asks attendees about a possible return to Salt Lake City.

The biggest outdoor brands, such as Burton, Patagonia, Arc’teryx and The North Face, were not present at the Denver show. Many are pushing the show owner to include consumers, which would change the historic business focus of Outdoor Retailer. Outdoors industry advocates who left Salt Lake City years ago because of Utah’s support for a Trump administration move to reduce the size of national monuments oppose the possibility of a return to Beehive State.

And behind the political shenanigans on public lands are retailers and manufacturers who are completely questioning trade shows. For decades they met twice a year to buy and sell. Over the past two years of pandemic-related events, they have learned to ride and manage without coming together.

“The real issue here isn’t Colorado versus Utah or public lands. It’s about the longevity of an industry trade show,” said Nick Sargent, director of Snowsports Industries America, a non-profit, member-owned organization that has held its Snow Show once a year since 1954 before selling to Emerald and merging with Outdoor Retailer in 2017. .

Hundreds of ski and snowboard brands gathered in Salt Lake City for their very own Winter Sports Market show the weekend before OR. They did not attend the Outdoor Retailer Snow Show, as they had in previous years. Last summer, 421 retailers and hundreds of gear brands attended the new Big Gear Show in Utah, competing with the Outdoor Retailer Summer Market.

The winter sports brands heading to Utah weren’t a political statement, Sargent said.

“For them, it’s just good business,” he said.

These winter marks tell Sargent that the Colorado is too expensive. That’s why they left Outdoor Retailer and moved to the competing show in Utah, he said.

“You have to look at this thing holistically and say what the problem is? Well, winter sports will tell you that’s the price. In Denver, with the unions, the space, the hotels…it’s about 33% more expensive here than Salt Lake,” Sargent said. “You have values ​​and you have business. Winter sports are business. That’s not to say that values ​​aren’t important because they are really, really important. But we put business first.

But for others in the outdoor community, values ​​trump dollars when it comes to trade shows. The Outdoor Industry Association met with Emerald and told them that as long as Utah opposes President Joe Biden’s recent restoration of the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments, the outdoor industry is totally opposed. at a trade show in that state.

“We’ve learned over the past few years in Denver that we’re stronger when we’re together,” said Outdoor Industry Association executive director Lise Aangeenbrug. “We have an economy of scale with a show that serves everyone. So the idea of ​​not having everyone together at a concert really bothers us.

“At the same time, we really care deeply about public lands,” she added. “We hear that ski brands think Denver is expensive. We believe that the majority of our brands would consider public lands rather than other issues. »

Many brands are asking Emerald to consider a user-friendly item for a revamped outdoor retailer in Denver. Since its inception 40 years ago, Outdoor Retailer has been a business-to-business event and closed to the public. It may be time to welcome consumers. In this way, the brand could highlight not only its novelties, but also its policies on climate, diversity and public lands.

“They really want to speak directly with the consumer and having a closed, industry-only show doesn’t meet a lot of their goals,” Aangeenbrug said. “So maybe there’s a way to do both?”

Jake Roach has taken the Eagle-based QuietKat e-bike team to numerous trade shows over the past year, including the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas and the Hunting and Fishing Shot Show. All shows saw record crowds as COVID kept people home.

He sees new people moving to Colorado for an outdoor lifestyle and he would love to see Outdoor Retailer harness that energy. He thinks the show should stay in Colorado, but open up to more people.

“How can the show include the passion of all these people who come to Colorado? How can we make it interactive and open to everyone? Roach said. “This model, right now, it feels old and stale.”

When Emerald’s Interbike bike show in Las Vegas collapsed in 2019, the Sea Otter Classic in Monterey, California became a place where brands, retailers and consumers mingled around a race of bike.

“Outdoor Retailer should become an experience for everyone,” Roach said. “That way, everyone will come. That way, it will be an event where, when it’s over, everyone looks forward to the next one, not wondering if they’re even going to the next one.

Marisa Nicholson, Emerald X’s Director of Outdoor Retailer Shows, has spent the year “taking the pulse” of show attendees. A survey in June found the outdoor industry is stressed about safeguarding the supply chain of products from Asia, impacting lead times for retailers and brands to place orders in the rays.

Before Emerald signed a new long-term deal with Denver, Nicholson sent out another survey two weeks ago to thousands of outdoor retailer attendees asking for show dates and location.

The results of those two investigations will inform a decision that Nicholson says should come within the next two weeks.

It balances the business needs of manufacturers and retailers with the values ​​industry places on public lands. “How can we ensure that we support each other’s business needs and those initiatives that are essential for the business and for our planet and our ability as humans to continue to connect with nature?” she asked.

Nicholson said many of the biggest brands in the industry have grown into massive corporations with business models that don’t need trade shows. (It’s a common whisper heard in the world of outdoor retailers: Big brands have wanted to get out of national shows for years, and the political tussle on Utah’s public lands provides an exit strategy that allows them to give feel like they are leaving the salons in a noble fight.)

“But for 80% of our customers who are small and medium-sized, they don’t have these big buying groups and they have a big representative force and showrooms. They need this show to write orders and do business,” she said.

Sargent, with SIA, said it’s entirely possible to passionately support public lands and do business in Utah, where he lives.

“We have to be smarter about it and we have to use our political power and we have to use our industry vote to say, maybe we’ll come to Utah, but if we do, we have some caveats. , we want to work on these public land issues,” he said. “COVID has shown us that we don’t really need a trade show. But we need community. We are stronger together under one roof. If we can find a place where we can be together, we are strong, our voices are better, and we can do more.

Eynon had a quiet show. Its Denver-based Meier skis were one of the few ski makers at last week’s Outdoor Retailer Snow Show. It was one of hundreds of ski brands.

It does not interfere in public land policy. He’ll take his 13-year-old business to any trade show where he can reach new retailers and sell more skis. But it makes a statement in other ways.

Meier Skis, which uses Colorado-harvested beetle wood for ski cores, has always been an eco-friendly brand, Eynon said. This season, he’s partnered with the Colorado State Forest Service to plant a sapling in a burnt-out Colorado forest for every pair of skis he sells. Last season, it removed single-use plastic from all of its products and production processes.

“Look, we can’t lose half of our customer base, whether it’s retailers or consumers, by taking a grand position. If our participation in a show in Utah makes sense for us as a company, we will,” he said. “In the meantime, we’ll continue to pioneer meaningful, eco-friendly practices that make a difference.”

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Salt lake city

Man arrested nearly 25 years after kidnapping and assault in Salt Lake City

A man who has been on a warrant for nearly 25 years accusing him of kidnapping and sexually assaulting a woman in Salt Lake City has been arrested in California.

An arrest warrant was issued for Jaime Diaz Calderon, 46, in June 1997, charging him with aggravated kidnapping and two counts of aggravated sexual assault, felonies in the first degree; and robbery, a second-degree felony.

On April 7, 1997, Calderon kidnapped a woman he knew at gunpoint from Salt Lake City International Airport and sexually assaulted her at an undisclosed location in Salt Lake City, according to a statement released Thursday by Salt Lake Police. Court records show that Calderon lived near 1650 west and 600 south at the time.

Police quickly identified Calderon as a suspect and criminal charges were filed against him just two months after the alleged assault.

But he never showed up for a scheduled court hearing and a warrant was issued for his arrest. His warrant was in the National Crime Information Center database, which means that if Calderon was ever arrested or arrested anywhere in the United States, the law enforcement agency that contacted him would be informed of his mandate.

According to a press release issued by the Marin County Sheriff’s Office in northern California, detectives from the department’s Specialized Investigations Unit recently received information that Calderon was wanted in Salt Lake City and possibly lived in their county. The statement did not say how police were notified that Calderon was in their county.

“Detectives from (this unit) conducted surveillance, coordinated with the San Rafael Police Department, and were able to safely arrest Calderon. Calderon was taken into custody at the Marin County Jail as a fugitive from justice (Tuesday),” according to the ministry’s statement.

On Thursday, Salt Lake police were in the process of extraditing Calderon to Utah.

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Salt lake city government

Gun control: Utah bill declares state has ultimate power over gun laws

After two years of failed attempts, a Utah bill that clarifies only the state — not cities, counties or other local entities — can enact gun regulations has cleared a major legislative hurdle Thursday.

The Utah Senate voted 20-5 to approve SB115, with Democrats voting against. It is now before the House for consideration – but the Senate was an obstacle. Previous versions of the bill had not survived in years past.

Once approved, the bill would close a loophole in state law that allowed Salt Lake County to require vendors at gun shows at county facilities to conduct background checks. track record since the beginning of 2020.

In 2020, the proposal was approved by the House in a party-line vote, but stalled in the Senate after Senate leaders refused to prioritize it and a host of others. gun-related bills. Another version of the bill also died in 2021 after being approved by the House, but never heard in the Senate.

The bill’s sponsors, Sen. Chris Wilson, R-Logan, and Rep. Cory Maloy, R-Lehi, said they are pushing SB115 to preserve Utahns’ freedoms and Second Amendment rights without “unnecessary interference.” of the government”.

“In recent years, local governments have attempted to exploit loopholes in state law to regulate guns at conventions, not acting in the best interests of all Utahns,” Wilson told the Senate on Tuesday, in a first vote.

“The purpose of this bill is to clarify and protect citizens from local firearms regulations that contradict state law.”

Wilson said current Utah law already prohibits cities and counties from passing gun regulations regarding the ownership, possession, transfer or transportation of a firearm.

“Local governments are prohibited from directly regulating firearms,” ​​Wilson said. “This bill makes it clear that local governments do not have the authority to regulate firearms.”

The bill declares that the Utah Legislature “occupies the entire realm of state firearms regulation” and specifies that state and local government entities – including colleges, universities, public schools, cities, counties, and other local entities — “may not adopt or enforce a directive that violates” state authority over gun regulation.

If a local government attempts to regulate guns, the bill would allow local government entities to be sued and “ensures that the local government is accountable,” Wilson said.

Democrats, including Sen. Derek Kitchen, D-Salt Lake City, pushed back against the bill, calling it “worrying” and a “blanket ban.” Kitchen expressed concern that it would prohibit cities from regulating “where a gun store, for example, can be located.”

“I think that’s pretty clear excess on the part of the state,” Kitchen said.

Senator Kathleen Riebe, D-Cottonwood Heights, said she was “shocked” to learn that rural counties, including Duchesne and Millard counties, have the highest rates of gun violence in the state. . She also pointed to a shooting last month on a West Valley City sidewalk that killed two Hunter High School freshman football players and hospitalized a sophomore football player.

“I think we need to increase our accountability, not decrease it,” Riebe said.

While some Democratic lawmakers questioned whether the bill would impact the state’s suicide rate, Republicans pushed back, arguing that a bill clarifying the state’s regulatory authority firearms would not have an impact on suicide rates.

“The fact is, most gun violence in the state of Utah is self-harm,” said Sen. Daniel Thatcher, of R-West Valley City. “It’s a tragic fact and something we’ve been working on and something we’ve addressed in other bills. This bill will have no impact on the suicide rate in the state of Utah.

SB115 is now going home, where previous versions have sailed with wide support.

Contributor: Ashley Imlay

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Salt lake city

The race is on to save the Great Salt Lake: will that be enough?

SALT LAKE CITY — The largest natural lake west of the Mississippi is shrinking past its lowest levels on record, raising fears of toxic dust, ecological collapse and economic consequences. But the Great Salt Lake may have new allies: conservative Republican lawmakers.

The new burst of energy from the GOP-dominated state government comes after lake levels recently bottomed during a regional mega-drought exacerbated by climate change. However, water has been diverted from the lake for years to supply Utah homes and crops. The fastest growing state in the country is also one of the driest, with some of the highest domestic water consumption.

This year could see a big investment in the lake that has long been an afterthought, with Governor Spencer Cox offering to spend $46 million and the powerful Speaker of the House leaning on the issue. But some worry that the ideas advanced so far in the state Legislature do not go far enough to stop the environmental disaster in slow motion.

One proposal would tackle water use in homes and businesses, metering outdoor water which is considered some of the cheapest in the country. Another would pay farmers to share their water downstream, and a third would direct mining royalty money to benefit the lake.

“I’ve long taken the lake for granted. It’s always been there, and I assumed it always would be,” House Speaker Brad Wilson said at a summit he hosted. called on the matter. But learning of the lake’s precarious position this summer left him terrified. “The Great Salt Lake is in trouble. … We have to do something.”

The shrinking lake poses serious risks to millions of migratory birds and a lake-based economy worth an estimated $1.3 billion in mineral extraction, brine shrimp and recreation. Health risks also exist: the huge dry bed of the lake could send dust containing arsenic into the air that millions of people breathe.

“The Great Salt Lake needs a few jumps to be saved. It won’t come in small steps,” said Zach Frankel, executive director of the nonprofit Utah Rivers Council. babies that should have been made 20 years ago.”

Shrimp both support a multi-million dollar industry providing food for fish farms and feed millions of migrating birds whose massive flocks may appear on the radar. The lake is also the country’s largest source of magnesium and could soon provide lithium, a key mineral for renewable energy batteries.

But last year the lake hit a 170-year high and continued to decline, hitting a new low of 4,190.2 feet (1,277.2 meters) in October. A significant part of the microbialites was exposed to the air, killing vital microbes. Death will likely take years and years to repair even if they are completely submerged again, said Michael Vanden Berg, a state geologist.

And if water levels continue to drop, the lake could become too salty for edible microbes to survive, which has already happened in the bright pink waters of the lake’s North Arm.

Still, Vanden Berg is cautiously optimistic for the South Arm, where some of the green microbialites survived last year’s lake fall.

“It’s bad but not catastrophic yet,” he said. “There is still time to repair and alleviate the situation.”

In some ways, the solution is simple: more water needs to flow into the lake.

But that’s no small task in the state, which has grown 18.4% over the past decade to nearly 3.28 million people.

Utah overall has relatively cheap water. A 2015 state audit found that water prices in Salt Lake City were lower than nearly every other city surveyed, including Phoenix, Las Vegas and Santa Fe.

But a subset of households have access to particularly cheap water — the cheapest in the nation, according to the Utah Rivers Council.

About 200,000 households and businesses pay a flat fee for an entire season of irrigation water. It’s called a secondary water system, made from converted agricultural supply in communities that are now largely suburban. These represent a disproportionately large segment of the state’s water use — and many of them are in the Great Salt Lake watershed, Frankel said.

“It’s like an all-you-can-eat buffet,” he said. While most people have a water meter on the side of their house, usage is unmetered for secondary water users.

But small-scale projects have shown that simply being mindful of how much they use causes people to cut back by 20%, said GOP Utah Rep. Tim Hawkes.

There have been pushbacks to change the system before, and part of the reason is the cost per yard of about $1,500, but the governor backed spending about $250 million in federal relief funds in pandemic to install them.

The Utah Rivers Council would like to see people pay more for this water, but there has been little public discussion about it this year. Hawkes argues that even 20% conservation through outreach would dramatically increase the chances of the lake remaining healthy.

This year is shaping up to be a wetter year than 2021, but that doesn’t immediately translate to more water for the lake. First comes the replenishment of drinking water. Next comes the lake.

And homes and businesses aren’t the only ones that need moisture. About 65% of the water in the Great Salt Lake watershed is used for agriculture. Farmers have a right to this water and, under historical laws, they could lose the water they don’t use.

“Right now, there’s actually a disincentive for agriculture to conserve or optimize the water it uses,” Republican Rep. Joel Ferry said.

He is sponsoring legislation that would allow farmers to be paid for the water they leave flowing into the Great Salt Lake and other bodies. Since every farmhouse is much larger than the average home, even slight adjustments can have a major impact.

Under his plan, which advanced to the state Legislature, it would be up to each farm to decide whether or not to sell water in any given year. The fund would also likely start with federal money in the event of a pandemic, and funders hope to secure donations as they go.

“It’s going to be a slow start,” said Ferry, who is a farmer himself. “We recognize there is a problem, and farmers want to be part of the solution. … Ultimately, the solutions to this are going to be expensive.

The costs of doing nothing can be even higher. The drying up of Lake Owens in California as Los Angeles grew cost billions. Overseas, the Aral Sea has become a source of toxic dust after its water was diverted by the former Soviet Union. Experts estimate that a drying up of the Great Salt Lake could cost Utah more than $2 billion each year.

“There is a real question about what will happen next. Are we going to cross some critical thresholds here in a moment if we keep going down? Hawkes said. “If we act now and think about it…there’s a good chance we can keep the lake healthy and happy – and us with it.”

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Salt lake city government

Utah, home of conservative Trump critics, hosts GOP meeting | National government and new policies

Stuart Stevens and Reed Galen, two co-founders of the Lincoln Project, live in Park City. The group was founded in 2019 by current and former Republicans disillusioned with the direction of the GOP under Trump.

But the GOP was Utah’s fastest-growing political party during Trump’s tenure, adding more than 200,000 registered active voters. Trump won hundreds of thousands more votes in 2020 than in 2016, increasing his share of the electorate by double digits.

“They predicted that Utah would turn more blue, or even turn into a purple state, in the last election. But Utah actually moved the other way,” said Utah Republican Party Chairman Carson Jorgensen, a 32-year-old sheep farmer from rural Sanpete County.

Jorgensen said he hopes the winter meeting will showcase Salt Lake City as an ideal location for the party’s convention in 2024. The RNC plans to make a decision on a host this spring and is considering Nashville, Tennessee, Milwaukee and Pittsburgh in addition to Salt Lake City. The 2020 convention was disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic, with business sessions held in Charlotte, North Carolina, and other events in Washington, DC, including, controversially, at the White House.

“We’re a really good fit for that, for the simple fact that we’ve been under Republican conservative governance for a long time now,” Jorgensen said, noting Utah’s economic growth and low unemployment rate. “These things don’t happen by accident. I think the RNC is really starting to take notice, even as the states around us turn really blue.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Salt lake city

Josh Groban Harmony tour: When is the Salt Lake City concert?

Josh Groban — the Grammy-nominated singer — will perform in Salt Lake City in the summer of 2020.

The news: Groban will bring their Harmony Tour to Salt Lake City, performing at Vivint Arena on July 27.

  • Groban will be joined by the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Lucia Micarelli and Eleri Ward.

What he says : “So excited for this summer!!” he wrote about Instagram.

Rollback: At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Groban sang “You Raise Me Up” a cappella for thousands of people on Facebook – from his shower.

  • “There’s no more corona than that,” Groban told the Deseret News recently. “Acoustics good in there – to be fair, it really was the best place in the house to sing.”

The bigger picture: Groban told the Deseret News that he had done his best to perform virtually during the pandemic so he could bring people together.

  • “I love making music because I love the way it touches people,” Groban said. “I love being able to tell stories and being able to feel less alone through those stories. When you take something like COVID – which beyond the horrible physical things that happen – I think even if you don’t don’t get, we all feel the sanity part of just feeling that disconnect.
  • “We need to connect,” he continued. “And I think there’s a reappraisal of what art is doing in our lives to help us do that – especially right now. Music can play a really wonderful role in staying sane through everything. that.

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Salt lake city government

Governor Cox Signs Executive Order Allowing State Employees to Replace Teaching

Governor Spencer Cox on Monday signed an executive order to increase the number of substitute teachers for Utah schools.

According to a statement from the governor’s office, the order grants state employees an approved leave of absence from their government jobs to fill staffing gaps in public or private schools.

“We know children learn best in the classroom, so we want to do what we can to help schools stay open,” Cox said in a statement. “Our teachers and our children deserve our support during this difficult phase of the pandemic. We hope that many of the state’s 22,000 employees will take advantage of this opportunity to help our schools.

RELATED

The Omicron variant has led to an unprecedented wave of absenteeism among teachers and education personnel, according to the governor’s statement. The purpose of Cox’s executive order is to help ease some of the tension by giving state employees the option to teach or perform another job — like working in the cafeteria.

Under Executive Order 2022-02, Utah employees will have up to 30 hours of paid leave to replace teaching or staff at a public or private school.

The order expires at the end of June.

State employees who take advantage of the program will be required to pass a background check. Qualified employees will receive both state pay and school district compensation.

Read the decree here:

MORE from 2News:

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Salt lake city

Details released after chase that injured 1 officer, hit 3 police cruisers before ending in Salt Lake City

Officers from Unified PD and Salt Lake City Police following a winding chase that began in Millcreek and ended at SLC late Saturday night. Photo: Gephardt Daily/Patrick Benedict

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, Jan. 30, 2022 (Gephardt Daily) — A man faces nine felony charges after police say he responded to a traffic stop by pressing his foot on the gas pedal, forcing the driver to leave her seat, and the start of a winding police chase that left one officer injured and three police cars damaged.

The lawsuit, which reportedly began 300 East and 3900 South, Millcreekfinished at 133 Mead Ave. (about 1000 south), Salt Lake City, with suspect Zachary L. Ommundson attempting to flee on foot, but being taken into custody, according to his probable cause statement.

The initial traffic stop was made for an inoperable taillight, says a statement filed by an officer with the Salt Lake County Sheriff’s Office.

“The vehicle was occupied by a female driver, the subject in the center front seat, and a passenger in the front passenger seat,” the report said. “Your depositor has asked the driver to turn off the vehicle and has collected identifying information. A records check has been performed
on the three individuals and the subject was found to have multiple statewide warrants.

Unified PD and Salt Lake City Police officers following a chase that began at 300 East 3900 South in Millcreek and ended on Mead Ave. in Salt Lake City. Photo: Gephardt Daily/Patrick Benedict

The male suspect on the passenger side was asked to step out and he did. Ommundson, 37, who was seated in the center, was ordered out next.

“Subject turned on the vehicle, put the vehicle into gear, and pushed his foot on the accelerator,” the statement read. “A UPD officer ordered the subject to stop and attempted to remove the subject from the vehicle, but was struck by the vehicle, causing a lower leg injury.

“The driver was abducted by the subject and later stated that she was forced out of the driver’s seat by the subject and held against her will.”

The chase began.

“Your filer had turned on his emergency lights and sirens and the subject did not stop,” the statement continued. “During the chase, the subject struck your affiant’s vehicle and continued to flee. Subject drove into oncoming traffic, through a barrier and eventually lost control at 980 S. 160 West. Subject overturned vehicle in SLCPD officerfrom the vehicle, then attempted to flee again, but was cornered and taken into custody.

Photo: Gephardt Daily/Patrick Benedict

A police search revealed contraband.

“There was a tomahawk in the driver’s seat and the subject was a restricted person. Subject was discovered to have a positive methamphetamine field test on him. »

Ommundson faces initial charges of:

  • Aggravated kidnapping, a first degree felony
  • Aggravated theft, takes usable vehicle, first degree felony
  • Three counts of Assaulting a Peace Officer/Military with Weapon or Force, a Second Degree Felony
  • Failure to respond to officer’s stop signal, with death/injury, a third degree felony
  • Failure to stop when ordered by police, a third degree felony
  • Possession of a Schedule ll/lll/analogue controlled substance, a third degree felony
  • Possession of a dangerous weapon by a restricted person, a third degree felony
  • Driving with a denied license, a class C misdemeanor
  • Driving on the left side of the road when prohibited, an offense

Because Ommundson’s actions demonstrated he was a flight risk, a judge granted the officer’s request that the suspect be held in the Salt Lake County Jail without bond.

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Salt lake city government

Utah’s COVID outbreak hits homeless population hard

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — COVID-19 cases rose in Utah throughout January, posing a problem for people who are not sheltered and without medical place to isolate yourself.

United Way of Utah County’s Mountainland Continuum of Care program is a coalition of local nonprofit organizations and government agencies that work with the homeless population. Mountainland Project Coordinator Heather Hogue Tells KUER-FM their outreach workers are seeing more unprotected people infected with the virus in Utah County due to the omicron surge.

Over the past week she said she has been working to find places to isolate people. Hogue said she emails and calls trying to find out which agencies need funds to pay for hotel stays.

Hogue said they use their motel voucher system and the Utah County Isolation Center to treat people who are on the streets.

But there are some concerns, due to the advised isolation period. Unlike the general public — who are advised a five-day isolation period — the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends unsheltered people stay away from others for a full 10 days. Hogue said it can get tricky.

“I believe we have the funding to get people to a safe place,” Hogue said. “It’s just the number of hotels available. What does the vacancy rate look like now? Are they ready for us?

She said people who are homeless and test positive for COVID can access services through their agency. Hogue said transportation is provided, as well as meals and basic amenities.

Other agencies, like Fourth Street Clinic, a community health center in Salt Lake City, recently received funding from Intermountain Healthcare to help with their COVID-19 efforts. They provided medical treatment to the homeless population with vaccines and isolation centers.

Janida Emerson, the clinic’s chief executive, said one of the challenges she faces is staffing.

“We all like other health care providers and have staffing issues,” she said. “We have lost a lot of our staff over the past year to burnout. It is therefore becoming increasingly difficult to be able to maintain operations in a way that we know will maximize patient and staff safety.

She also said they’ve seen a lot of vaccine hesitancy among the homeless population in Salt Lake, this is due to the trauma people have gone through in the past.

“It takes a lot of education and a lot of extra time to walk someone through their vaccination concerns,” she said. “Our vaccination rates are lower than those of the general population.”

So far, about 60% of all Utah residents have been fully immunized, according to the Utah Department of Health.

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Salt lake city

Last call to visit mirability mounds on GSL this weekend

SALT LAKE CITY — The public has one last chance to see a unique geological phenomenon at Great Salt Lake.

The Rangers take visitors to visit the mounds of mirability, just as they have the last two years.

Sunday will be the last day that these unique tours will be offered. Visits also took place last weekend.

“These mineral salt deposits can only be seen under specific winter conditions and we don’t know how long these formations will last this year,” Utah State Parks wrote.

READ: Protesters call for more action to protect the Great Salt Lake

Participants must register before Saturday at 5 p.m. Online registration can be found at Great Salt Lake State Park website. Tours will take place on Sundays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and tour groups are limited to 20 people each.

Park rangers suggest wearing waterproof or waterproof boots, as the tour may include walking through deep mud.

In late 2019, a Great Salt Lake State Park ranger noticed the mounds on the north shore of the lake. The State Park Service said they build up when sodium sulfate-rich spring water hits the cold winter air.

In January 2020, just months after their discovery, geologists said they were commonly found on polar ice caps and on Mars. October 2019 was the first time they were seen – or at least officially documented – at the Great Salt Lake.

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Utah economy

Presidio’s Steve Perry Becomes Salt Lake 2022 Board Chair

NORTH SALT LAKE, Utah – January 28, 2022 – (Newswire.com)

Presidio Real Estate is honored to announce that Steve Perry, COO of Presidio, will serve a one-year term as Chairman of the Salt Lake Board of Realtors® for 2022. This prestigious role is one of many for which Steve s is volunteered. His experience includes military service and being mayor of a city as well as law enforcement. Additional roles Steve fills this year include serving on the board of directors for the Utah Association of Realtors® and the National Association of Realtors®. Steve’s commitment to helping people and making a difference is unmatched. His involvement in the community is evident as he continues to serve the people through his role as President. Steve has been a consistent major contributor to the Realtor® Political Action Committee.

Jennifer Yeo, Owner of Presidio, said, “Steve is a proven and effective leader who has the full support of Presidio to lead the largest Board of Realtors® in the State of Utah and to achieve its goal to “raise the bar” in real estate this year. . Steve wants to improve professionalism on our board. “Realtors® should be experts when it comes to writing contracts, understanding market values ​​and helping their clients,” Steve said. He continues: “By taking continuing education courses and brokers training their agents, we can all grow together.

Utah was the fastest growing state in 2021, measured by percentage growth. Steve’s view is that Real Estate Agents® play a vital role in home ownership. With the changing economy, the complexity of buying and selling a home has never been more difficult. There are so many legal aspects that need to be considered and executed appropriately to avoid the risks and pitfalls that can arise when buying or selling without Realtor®. Steve is committed to helping Salt Lake Council officers understand their value proposition and instill professionalism in their practices.

Steve is a family man. With his wife April, Steve has six children and six grandchildren. Steve enjoys playing sports with his children such as pickleball, spike ball and crossnet. They also enjoy fishing trips, hiking, and enjoying nature in the beautiful state of Utah.

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Presidio’s Steve Perry Becomes Salt Lake 2022 Board Chair

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Salt lakes real estate

“Location, location, location” is a common mantra in real estate: why it’s the #1 factor to consider when buying a home

(Good Things Utah) – What makes a good location? It’s no surprise that top of the list for any new home purchase is where it’s built and what surrounds it. It determines how close you will be to the things that are important to you and your family. When you are in the market, stop for a moment to think about what you are really buying when buying a property, the reason should become clear.

Why is property location so important?

Homebuyers want to find a location that allows easy access to the places they frequent most (work, school, shopping, recreation, place of worship, friends and family). Although most people make the decision to buy a property based on how much they like the house or apartment when you buy a property you are also buying land and in a way you are also buying the community experience. around that surrounds it.

Depending on your personal needs and preferences, you may not be able to buy a house with everything you want, but imagine moving to a community that has its own lake with a school and sports park across the street. the street, or who has the perfect route with light traffic. Let’s break down the details and talk about the amazing benefits that can be found in some of Utah’s newer communities.

What’s at the top of Utah homebuyers’ wish list?

Here are some of the top items on a homebuyer’s wish list according to a local homebuilder:

  1. Proximity to goods and services
    • Schools
    • Parks – playgrounds
    • Activities
  2. Community look and feel
    • Go to the local cafe and hang out
    • Be close to your friends and family
    • Can always count on the “good neighbours”
  3. Fun and active community
    • On-site activities and events
    • Outdoor concerts
    • Shops & Restaurants
  4. Pets welcome
    • A place to walk your pet

5. Easy outdoor access

New homes in Daybreak, Utah

Daybreak is one of Utah’s most unique communities. There are two new communities being built in the Daybreak area and there is so much to offer between the two.

Cascade Village, is one of Daybreak’s newer communities. There is no greater adventure than living in southern Jordan. This new Daybreak community features eight new floor plans with trendy Farmhouse or Craftsman elevations.

New homes at Daybreak are designed with the owner in mind. These homes range in size from 2,753 square feet to 3,464 square feet with unfinished basements with room. With its uptown flair and unrivaled lifestyle, you’ll enjoy Daybreak to the fullest. Whether your vibe is hanging out at the cafe, paddle boarding on the lake, walking over 30 miles of trails, or hanging out at one of the parks with your kids or dog, this is the perfect place to call home.

Daybreak offers a unique experience that has made it a major sought-after destination throughout the Salt Lake Valley. The lakes, rivers and upscale clubhouse set this place apart from the rest. Local home builder. Fieldstone Homes is currently building two beautiful model homes which will open in the spring of 2022.

You are invited to the grand opening

Come to the Official Opening Tent Event Details Saturday, January 29and from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. In addition to seeing these beautiful model homes, you can enjoy a free lunch, claim a souvenir hat, and taste delicious Daybreak honey.

Visit Fieldstone Homes to learn more.


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This story contains sponsored content.

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Salt lake city

Utah is building a modern, one-car European district on the outskirts of Salt Lake City

Point

Car-free zones, cycle paths, pedestrian-friendly urban design; these are not the characteristics of a typical American suburb. They’re more like something you’d find in the Netherlands rather than Salt Lake City, Utah, where a new “one-car community” is being built in an experimental suburb.

Called Pointit is located on 600 acres of federal land in Draper that once housed a prison and will be purpose-built so that businesses, families and individuals can access each neighborhood within a 15-minute walk or bike ride.

Point

Utah is famous for having 60% of its land under various forms of state and federal protection, due to its majestic and unique desert and scrub landscapes. As the population grows, planners and developers wonder how to grant access to one of the most beautiful states without impacting nature too overtly.

In order to understand this, town hall-style meetings revealed that local opinions favored a more walkable planned community.

TO VERIFY: The world’s first 3D printed house made from local raw earth – and it closes the roof with a dome

“We heard loud and clear from them that the principles of having a more hands-on, less car-focused development, and a somewhat more compact, amenity-rich community, would be appealing,” Alan Matheson, executive director of The Point of the Mountain State Land Authority, said fast company.

About 7,400 homes together, built by global engineering and development firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, will be located in cells connected by veins of greenery to each major city area.

Point

Cars aren’t banned, but streets will have bike lanes and wide sidewalks, and buses will run around the perimeter, perhaps automatically, to transport people to major areas, as well as downtown Salt. Lake City.

RELATED: This ice-carved hotel suite will leave you warm with memories of nature’s beauty

The point will connect to the Jordan River Parkway to take hikers and cyclists to nearby mountain trail networks. This trail will also facilitate the movement of wildlife between the river and the mountains.

“The idea here is that it’s an economic driver for the state to attract young workers who are in the tech sector or the science sector, and we know they don’t want to live in the suburbs, often, as the suburbs are currently configured,” Peter Kindel, one of the developers, told Fast Company.

“They want more urban features, they want to know their neighbors, they want to be part of a community. They don’t want to spend their day driving.

FOLLOWING: Visit ‘Fortlandia’ where designers built odes to childhood Fort-Building in Austin, Texas

The Point was created in three different configurations, which preserves all the fundamental “points” of the idea, namely community, connection with nature, intelligent and less car-oriented public transport, and economic opportunity, as well as a coverage of 45 % of the city in green. These configurations, the developers hope, will influence future building growth opportunities.

SHARE the stunning design with these social feeds…

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Utah economy

The major Utah earthquake is still imminent; here’s how lawmakers can prepare |Opinion

At 6:35 a.m. on August 30, 1962, an earthquake struck the town of Logan hard. It was one of those life-changing events – something the rest of us would be wise to remember.

Witnesses said it started with a rolling rumble that quickly dissolved into the sound of breaking glass and falling bricks.

Official sources differ as to its potency. The United States Geological Survey marked it at 5.9 on the Richter scale. The University of Utah’s Intermountain Seismic Belt Historic Earthquake Project calls it a 5.7, similar to the one that struck the Salt Lake Valley in March 2020.

But that’s about the only thing the two have in common.

A small breakfast crowd sat at the counter of Model Billiards on West Center Street in Logan that morning in 1962 when the walls parted and the roof collapsed. Fortunately, no one got hurt.

The roof collapsed on the chapel of the Logan Fourth Ward building of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, according to a Deseret News account at the time. Walls crumbled all over the city. On Federal Avenue, the Smith Printing Company lost 40 feet of its west-facing wall.

Windows large and small shattered and left debris all over the city. Cans, broken glass and groceries littered grocery store aisles. At Logan Temple, plaster fell from the ceilings and a weather vane and lightning rod collapsed.

Nearby Richmond suffered the worst damage. The LDS Benson Stake Tabernacle, a stately brick building built in 1904, was so badly damaged that it later had to be razed.

Remarkably, the only reported injury involves a girl from Richmond, who suffered a cut on her foot from a broken bottle.

In contrast, the Salt Lake earthquake 48 years later caused little damage except to one type of building – those constructed with unreinforced masonry.

Judging by the reports from 1962, this is the only common thread. Bricks crumbling, walls separating and falling, resulting in collapsed roofs – these are the telltale signs of buildings held together by nothing but bricks and mortar, with roofs held in place by nothing more than gravity.

A new report from the Utah Seismic Safety Commission repeats a long-held estimate that 140,000 of these unreinforced buildings exist along the Wasatch front, ranging from single-family homes to apartments and office buildings. They were built before the strict building codes of 1976. Experts say most injuries and deaths, especially in an earthquake much larger than the one in 2020, would occur in and around these buildings .

The report provides five recommendations for ways this year’s Utah legislature can prepare for the big one now, reducing the overall damage. It involves improving the four major aqueducts that deliver water to more than 2 million Utah residents; fund an ongoing study on the repair of school buildings that may be vulnerable; ensure that buildings larger than 200,000 square feet or otherwise serving vital purposes (hospitals, schools, police stations) undergo rigorous structural review; that an early warning system be put in place; and that the public be made aware of these 140,000 vulnerable buildings.

Frankly, the latter is not enough. With all the extra money lawmakers have this year, they should be funding programs that help homeowners with their problems. Some cities already have Fix the Bricks programs in place, but these tend to be underfunded. Unfortunately, many people who live in these structures have meager means. Many of them are tenants.

So the other thing lawmakers should do is pass a law requiring sellers to notify buyers that a home is unreinforced and vulnerable to an earthquake. This could be coupled with requirements to inform potential buyers of state programs to help them resolve the issue.

I have heard that real estate agents oppose such a requirement. It’s natural. But the requirement would begin to put pressure on landowners to fix the problem.

Mere awareness is not enough.

It’s one of those issues that makes everyone a gamer, betting they won’t have to deal with it in their lifetime. The report says the odds of the Wasatch Front having an earthquake of magnitude 6.75 or greater within the next 50 years are essentially a toss-up. Do you feel lucky?

If that happened, such an earthquake could change this place forever, ruining our economy and our way of life for many years. FEMA officials predict it could be one of the deadliest natural disasters in US history, rivaling the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.

In Logan, the damage caused by this relatively mild earthquake of 1962 is forever etched in our memories. In 2012, the Logan Herald Journal reported on a 50th anniversary commemorative event.

Former Richmond Mayor F. Richard Bagley told the newspaper that the earthquake changed his town forever, destroying two churches and many homes. “It just changed our appearance,” he said.

Utah leaders should do everything they can now to ensure that a Wasatch front that’s far more populated than Logan’s in 1962 will be altered as little as possible if a big hit.

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Salt lake city government

We are all journalists, exposing the truth through GRAMA queries

SALT LAKE CITY — This is National News Literacy Week, part of an initiative by EW Scripps with the News Literacy Project to become more informed consumers of news, while highlighting the important role credible journalism plays in a world increasingly filled with misinformation.

Much of what we do at FOX 13 is uncovering and presenting the truth through stories you see on television daily.

In fact, a big story that our investigative team revealed in 2020 came from a concerned parent who has used a resource known as the Government Records Access and Management Act (GRAM).

GRAMA gives anyone the right to request records from Utah government agencies by email, fax, mail, in person, or through the Open Records Portal.

That’s what led Raina Williams to hundreds of text messages and emails revealing name-calling, insults, profanity and general dysfunction within the Salt Lake City School Board.

“The information that finally came out was so shocking and alarming,” Williams explained.

Williams says she didn’t expect to find this type of information when she first filed a GRAMA application.

At the time, she was attending school board meetings to learn about their back-to-school plans during the pandemic since she had five children in the district.

Instead of answers, Williams said she got inconsistent information.

“I thought, ‘Something is different.’ The private discussion between school board members and the superintendent is obviously very different from what they tell us,” Williams said.

FOX 13 asked Williams about her experience filing a GRAMA application as a non-journalist.

She said filing was easy, but getting the information she was looking for was not. Williams said it took him about three months of hard work before he got anything substantial back.

Once she did, Williams took the information to FOX 13 investigative reporter Adam Herbets.

“She had all the information in hand and was ready to go before I even picked up her first phone call,” Herbets said. “There are a lot of stories that we chase that never end up on TV because the facts just aren’t there.”

Herbets believes the GRAMA process would be more effective if more people knew they could access it.

“I think if the government was very open about the fact that we have records that you have the right to see, more people would,” he explained.

When it comes to the GRAMA application process in Utah, Jean Norman, a member of the Society of Professional Journalists and an associate professor of multimedia journalism at Weber State University, finds GRAMA to be one of the easiest systems. use.

She says Utah offers more support for public records requests than other states where you’ll likely need to hire an attorney.

Ultimately, Norman said it simplifies the process that journalists and citizens must go through to access the same information.

“You don’t need a license to be a journalist. You just have to be curious, you have to be willing to set aside your own biases and try to look at things objectively.

If you need help completing a GRAMA application or have a question about the process, contact our team of investigators here.

The Society of Professional Journalists Region 9 – Society of Professional Journalists (spj.org) and the Utah Investigative Journalism Project Contact Information – The Utah Investigative Journalism Project are other resources Norman recommends to help citizens and journalists learn more about GRAMA.

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Salt lake city

Real Salt Lake are still looking for a key midfielder heading into the 2022 season

SALT LAKE CITY – Real Salt Lake are still looking for a midfielder ahead of the 2022 season.

Throughout the successful 2022 campaign, Real Salt Lake were frequently exposed to counterattacks following weak turnovers of possession and were never able to adapt. Manager Pablo Mastroeni was eventually forced to change the formation back to the more conservative 4-2-3-1.

However, Mastroeni has expressed interest in playing with a more aggressive attitude. Ideally, Real Salt Lake in 2022 will be an attacking juggernaut capable of creating goal-scoring opportunities through a number of different avenues while maintaining a defensive structure.

More depth needed

The return of Everton Luiz will strengthen the defensive presence in midfield. Luiz and Pablo Ruiz have both shown signs of promise playing side by side. But Real Salt Lake cannot rely on Luiz and Ruiz like they did in 2021. The club needs more depth.

Luiz, otherwise known to some as “The Enforcer”, will likely be paramount to the organization’s success. Luiz was unavailable for selection for the Western Conference Finals due to an accumulation of yellow cards and his presence was sorely missed.

The aggressive Brazilian is fierce, skilful and his style of play is contagious. Each time he sees the field, the energy of the group of players is significantly higher. However, Luiz frequently finds himself in trouble throughout the season due to the abundance of yellow cards he receives. He is unfortunately not a reliable player due to his violent style of play.

Ruiz, on the other hand, is most comfortable when football is at his feet. His ability to throw balls from one side of the pitch to the other, to feed an attacking player behind the defense is world class. The problem with relying on Ruiz to be the solution is his age, he’s still only 23 and developing as a midfielder.

Ruiz was brought to Real Salt Lake in 2018 and started his Major League Soccer career at left-back before being loaned to Austrian club FC Pinzgau Saalfelden. Upon his return, he was inserted into the heart of the midfield where he has been ever since. His development and understanding of the position is still ongoing and as good as he gets, it’s still likely he’ll have to dominate the heart of the pitch in a few years.

Nick Besler has also spent a lot of time in midfield throughout 2021. He feels and looks the most comfortable in the role and was able to set up several games where he was in talks for the best on field. Consistency has always been the problem with Besler. One night he looks like he’s in total control, the next night he’s not.

Besler will still play a central role for Real Salt Lake in 2022. His leadership, guidance and experience will be needed as Real Salt Lake searches for answers in the heart of the park. It’s likely, however, that Besler will do most of his damage off the bench this year.

Beckerman 2.0, please?

Real Salt Lake have been blessed with the services of Kyle Beckerman for as long as they have. Beckerman was not only a great footballer, but a tremendous leader and motivator. A disciplined six, who has the ability to provide a spark when moving the ball forward, but who cares more about team structure and organization, is exactly what Real Salt Lake is currently lacking. .

Real Salt Lake is currently in Tucson, Arizona preparing for the 2022 season. The club will return to Utah on February 2 after playing practice games against Grand Canyon University and the Houston Dynamo on January 26. February 2 respectively.

The first game of the 2022 season is scheduled for February 28 when they travel to Houston. On March 6, Real Salt Lake will host Seattle in the season opener at home.

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Utah economy

Does Utah have enough water? Here’s what you need to know

Utah’s water use and the distribution systems that deliver the limited resource to taps, farms, fields and landscaping will likely be the focus of this legislative session as Governor Spencer Cox and lawmakers are tackling the challenges posed by the historic drought that suffered major cutbacks over the summer.

Here’s what you need to know:

The Great Salt Lake in danger

Using the declining lake as a backdrop, Cox unveiled a budget plan that, among other things, calls for $600,000 to update its management plan, $45 million in federal COVID-19 relief funds for its conservation. and an additional $5 million that lawmakers appropriated in May. The lake fell below its historic low in October from a record set in 1963, raising alarm and urgency on how best to protect this resource, valued as an economic driver of 1.3 billion dollars for the state.

water development

Cox pointed to the need for more water development projects to shore up the state’s finicky water supply in which 95% of the state’s water comes as snow in the mountains. He said it was an “abomination” that Utah didn’t pursue more water development projects like generations past. In his opening address to the Senate, Senate Speaker Stuart Adams, R-Layton, said the state must build the Lake Powell Pipeline and Bear River Development Project, sparking angst that has been simmering ever since. long from fierce critics like Zach Frankel, executive director of the Utah Rivers Board. Frankel and others insist that there is plenty of water for everyone and that Utah must end its wasteful practices by setting the true cost of water appropriately. Frankel, though he had kind words for Tage Flint on his impending retirement from the Weber Basin Water District, skewered the district under Flint’s leadership and said he had failed to implement a sustainable water policy and had missed opportunities to do the right thing.

money talks

Cox’s budget recommends half a billion dollars in “generational investment” in water, much of it to expand secondary water metering in Utah. Some regions have already adopted metering, but the equipment is expensive and the program takes time to implement. It’s estimated that more than 70% of secondary water is sucked up by landscaping, so Cox wants Utah to be the first in the country to implement a nationwide “Flip Your Strip” program. A state in which residents are paid to tear up grass and replace it with aquatic vegetation.

The infrastructure albatross

While all eyes are on conservation and new water development projects, the creeping challenge of existing “out of sight, out of mind” infrastructure demands attention and money to replace or repair. systems that are well past their technical lifespan. A unanimous recommendation from the Utah Seismic Safety Commission urges that $192 million be spent on four major Wasatch Front aqueducts that provide water to more than two million people. The report notes that it makes little sense to upgrade water treatment plants and pipelines if there is no water in a distribution system that is collapsing under the weight of a major earthquake, for which experts agree that the state has been waiting for a long time. But what political appeal are the aging aqueducts generating in the Utah Capitol?

The spectrum of growth

Utah has long boasted of being number one for population growth, its vibrant economy, the best place to do business in the country, and its low employment rate. Is it tantamount to biting the state when it ensures that it has enough water for future generations, especially current residents? Cox complained that land use and water resources are treated as individual silos, which is the wrong way to manage the state’s most limited and precious resource: the water. Four years ago, then governor. Gary Herbert acknowledged that water was the only factor limiting the state’s continued growth, releasing a draft document as a model for the future. The classifieds are full of people looking to buy water rights, because without them, development is not possible. As suburban development takes hold and takes over these agricultural rights, what does this portend for the future of Utah’s farms and ranches? A survey commissioned by Envision Utah in 2014 showed that Utahans were willing to give up water on their landscaping to save it for agricultural purposes.

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Salt lake city government

Today’s Local Utah News Headlines – Monday Evening, January 24, 2022

Monday evening, January 24, 2022

State

Utah decides how to spend its share of national opioid settlement money

Utah is set to receive more than $300 million over the next two decades as part of a nationwide opioid settlement. State advocates and lawmakers met Monday to strategize how that money will be used in Utah. David Litvack of the state Department of Social Services said he was working with the attorney general’s office on drafting a plan of priorities for distributing the funds. Adam Cohen, of Odyssey House in Salt Lake City, suggested the money could help his organization expand patient access to services and retain and recruit staff. Read the full story. —Ivana Martinez

Bill would allow lawmakers not to report certain types of data they receive

Utah lawmakers are considering changing the type of non-monetary contributions political candidates should disclose. A bill pending in the Legislative Assembly stipulates that candidates would not have to divulge data, such as the results of a poll, which would be provided to them if they did not order it. But if they solicited this information, they should report it as an in-kind donation to their campaign. The bill’s sponsor said it would make it easier to share useful information that helps politicians craft better policies. Critics argue that this could allow candidates to indirectly request data and not have to report it. The legislation passed its first committee on Monday and is now heading to the floor of the House. — Sonja Hutson

Utah sees nearly 20,000 new COVID cases

The spike in COVID cases continued over the weekend in Utah. The state Department of Health said the total for the past three days was nearly 22,000. There are currently 738 people hospitalized with the disease and 87% of intensive care beds in Utah are full. More than a third of people in intensive care are COVID patients. Officials said another 33 people died in 11 counties across the state. — Caroline Ballard

Follow KUER’s coverage of the coronavirus in Utah.

Northern Utah

UVU teachers censor the school for its COVID response

Professors at Utah Valley University released a letter on Monday publicly censuring the school’s handling of the COVID pandemic. In a letter to the state Board of Higher Education, the instructors called the school’s COVID policies weak and unenforceable. They complained that the rules are suitable for unmasked and unvaccinated people. They are calling for mandatory masking on the Orem campus to help slow the spread of the virus. Teachers have also asked to be able to rely more on virtual teaching without fear of retaliation from the school. UVU had six days this month with more than 110 new cases. On those days, the school averaged about 700 tests a day. — Ross Terrell

Region/Nation

SCOTUS to take on major federal drinking water law case

The U.S. Supreme Court said on Monday it would consider limiting the scope of a landmark federal clean water law that allows the federal government to place limits on development or pollution near protected waters. . But there has long been a struggle over which waters are protected. The law’s language is vague, and a 2006 Supreme Court decision didn’t help. The 5-4 decision essentially created two conflicting definitions. Some judges said the law only protected permanent lakes, ponds, rivers and streams. Others have argued that it also protects wetlands and intermittent rivers and streams. This could have broad implications for the West, where many rivers and streams dry up in the summer. The Supreme Court will hear the case this fall. — Nate Hegyi, Mountain West Press Office

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Salt lake city

Money alert issued for 53-year-old endangered man in Salt Lake City

A silver alert has been issued for an endangered 53-year-old man last seen in the Federal Heights area of ​​Salt Lake City. Donald Leslie Brown was with his dog on the Limekiln Gulch Trail in Salt Lake City around 3 p.m. Sunday. (Salt Lake City Police)

Estimated reading time: less than a minute

SALT LAKE CITY — A silver alert has been issued for a 53-year-old endangered man last seen in the Federal Heights area of ​​Salt Lake City, the Department of Public Safety said.

The man, Donald Leslie Brown, was last known to be in the area of ​​309 N. Fairfax Circle on the Limekiln Gulch Trail in Salt Lake City around 3 p.m. Sunday, police said.

He is white, 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighs approximately 150 pounds. He has brown hair and hazel eyes. He is believed to be wearing a red hat, red woolen vest and beige pants. He was with a brown and white border collie named Tucker.

He is showing signs of mental illness and needs his medication, police said.

Anyone who sees Brown is asked to call Salt Lake Police at 801-799-3000 or dial 911.

Pictures

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Salt lake city

Despite struggles on beam, Red Rocks roll to win Arizona State

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4 Sports) — The top beam team in the nation didn’t look like it Friday night at the Huntsman Center.

But Utah’s gymnastics team is so deep and so talented that they had more than enough to pull off another win, posting season-high scores on bars and floor.

The No. 2-ranked Red Rocks easily beat No. 13 Arizona State at the Huntsman Center, 197,400 to 196,100.

Maile O’Keefe clocked 9.90 on beam and floor. Jillian Hoffman (floor) and Cristal Isa (beam) tied for the highest score in all events at 9.975.

“The ultimate conclusion tonight is that we have to run all four events,” said head coach Tom Farden. “Coming into the warm-ups I saw the vibe from the start and as coaches we need to help them prepare a bit more and be more intentional from the start. I know when they’re on and it’s was last weekend. I know when they have some quirks and it was this weekend.

Utah started the night with a solid vault production, led by Alexia Burch and Lucy Stanhope, who went on to claim a share of the event title. Utah combined for a 49.275 on vault to lead Arizona State, which posted a 49.225 on bars, in the first event.

The Utes appeared to have some momentum in the bar rotation after posting a season-high 49.425 as a team. Amelie Morgan set the tone early on posting a season high of 9.875. In her first barre routine of the season, Burch battled her way to a career-high 9.90 to keep the start going. Sage Thompson followed with a 9.85 before McCallum collected a season-high 9.925 that would earn him the first uneven bars title of his career.

Working with a slim 98.700-98.400 lead over the Sun Devils, Utah opened the beam with a 9.775 from Morgan but struggled to find any kind of consistency throughout the next three gymnasts. After a fall from Grace McCallum and a pair of scores in the 9.6 range, Isa had a huge rebound routine and got the crowd on their feet as she rolled in a career-high 9.975. The routine seemed like the momentum-changer the Red Rocks needed as O’Keefe stepped in next and worked his way to a 9.95 to wrap up an otherwise sub-par rotation for Utah .

Utah held a .250 lead going into the final rotation after 49.025 on beam. Continuing the momentum, Hoffman led the team on floor with a career-high 9.975 in his first-floor routine of the year. Hoffman’s routine, which became the first win of his career, sparked the rest of the roster as the Utes finished with four floor scores of 9.90 or better, combining for a 49.675.

Stanhope posted a 9.875 in second place, while Rucker hit a 9.925. With the game seemingly under control after Arizona State had their own problems on the beam, O’Keefe and Sydney Soloski closed the night in style with a pair of 9.95s.

Utah will be back in action next Saturday, Jan. 29, to host Stanford.

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Salt lake city government

Why Salt Lake City’s mayor says she’s ready to give herself an A for 2021

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall reviews her annual report card, a public accountability document examining the goals she has set in 2021, Thursday outside the mayor’s office in the Salt Lake City County Building. (Carter Williams, KSL.com)

Estimated reading time: 6-7 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Erin Mendenhall’s second year as mayor of Salt Lake City may not have been as intense as her first year in office, 2020, but she found there were many moments that made 2021 feel like an extension of that.

This is especially true given that 2021 ended with an increase in COVID-19 cases in the city and across the state due to the omicron variant. The year also presented new challenges, such as staff shortages and increased drought.

Despite all of this, Mendenhall believes the city has been able to not just survive, but thrive amid these challenges in 2021. So, as she revealed an update on the goals she set for 2021 last January, she’s ready to give herself a high mark on her Salt Lake City 2021 review.

“I think this is the first time I’d give us an A,” she said Thursday outside her office in the Salt Lake City-County Building.

The report offers an assessment of the progress of the projects and goals outlined by Mendenhall in his 2021 State of the City address.

There were 141 defined goals across all aspects of city government, including housing, crime, infrastructure, and the environment. About two-thirds of these goals are marked as completed, while most of the remaining goals are marked as “in progress.” Only about 16 were marked as incomplete.

Mendenhall said, of course, there are items the city may not have liked, but she argues that dozens of items on her list were things the city had never done before.

“It’s remarkable what we’ve done,” she said. “I’m incredibly proud of the employees of Salt Lake City Corporation for having the vision to put this plan together with me in the first place, but really for pulling it off as well as they did.”

So what was she most proud of?

  • Citywide crime is down 5.4% from 2020 and 1.3% from the five-year average. Robberies are down 18% from 2020 and 25% from the five-year average, according to Salt Lake City police data. However, it should be noted that these statistics show that the total number of violent crimes has increased by 4.8% compared to 2020 and by 13.8% compared to the five-year average, due to the increase in aggravated assault and criminal homicide, which the mayor had sought to reduce.
  • The city invested in 300 affordable housing units in 2021, the most in the city’s history.
  • It has made “great strides” in connecting residents of West Salt Lake City by partnering with the Utah Transit Authority to launch a new microtransit program for residents of those areas. Mendenhall said she hopes to expand it to other parts of the city in the future.
  • The city has supported small businesses by providing access to a $4 million community grant pool. It has also provided grants and loans to 38 companies close to construction projects, such as the 300 West project.
  • The city’s Tech Lake City and BioHive initiatives continued with partnerships with the life sciences industry.
  • City officials have completed a Foothills Trail Master Plan. However, plans to build more trails were put on hold in September due to growing erosion concerns. The mayor said Thursday that an independent review of the project was underway and provided no update on that pause.
  • The city updated its overall sustainability policy and its redevelopment agency launched a new policy to only fund projects that meet certain sustainability goals.
  • City officials planted another 1,000 trees on the west side of town.
  • The city has increased its municipal index from the Commission on Human Rights, becoming the first city in Utah to reach 100. The score is based on “the laws, policies and municipal services that are inclusive of the LGBTQ people who live there and work on it,” according to the Human Rights Campaign. Salt Lake City was rated at 75 in 2020.

The report card shows the mayor struggled the most with certain sustainability and homelessness goals.

For example, four of his eight reuse goals were marked as incomplete. The city did not continue its wood reuse program in 2021 after 13 tons of wood was provided to artists and community organizations after the 2020 windstorm toppled more than a thousand trees in the city. city.

The city also hasn’t completed plans to prioritize the use of compost from the city landfill, strengthen its waste recycling ordinances, or explore ways to “promote the voluntary reuse of materials to help low-income homeowners to improve their housing and reduce the cost of home ownership”. .”

Mendenhall outlined a plan to support a homeless winter shelter supported by other cities, the county and the state. That didn’t happen last year, and the city opened an emergency homeless shelter in a former motel last week. The city also fell short of the goal of creating a representative homeless council, as the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness already has a similar group and the bulletin says the city “will support these efforts instead of duplicate them”.

The mayor has marked his role in a small home project for the homeless in Utah. Mendenhall said Thursday the project is now in the hands of the city council; she hopes that the housing development will take place as soon as possible.


I couldn’t think of being in office at any other time in my life that would be better. This is an incredible moment in our city.

–Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall


The full bulletin of all 2021 goals and their current status can be found on the city’s website. It essentially wraps up the first half of Mendenhall’s term as mayor of Utah’s largest city.

She describes the first half as “resilient” as the city absorbed the punches thrown by natural disasters – a major earthquake, destructive storm and major drought – and a seemingly endless pandemic during her tenure, and continued.

“We keep picking ourselves up and we’re stronger than two years ago,” Mendenhall said. “I mean that as a community too. Our character has been exposed – it was already there. Crises don’t create character, they can expose it – and what I’ve seen of our people is remarkable.

“They’re so strong, creative, community-driven and they’re innovating and inventing all the time. … It’s incredibly inspiring,” she continued. “I couldn’t think of being in office at any other time in my life that would be better. It’s an incredible time in our city.”

This year marks the start of the second half of his current term as mayor. She is expected to provide her 2022 goals next week during her annual State of the City address scheduled for Tuesday.

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Salt lake city

A storm is brewing. How much snow will Utah get?

Most of the snow will be in the mountains, but the storm should help clear the air.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Poor air quality clouds the Salt Lake Valley on Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022.

The big news of a storm that will continue through Friday morning in Utah is not what it will bring, but what it will take away.

According to the national weather service, the winter storm will drop maybe a few inches of snow – maybe more in some areas. But the great news is that it should stir up the air and eliminate the inversion and at least some of the smog plaguing the valleys of northern Utah.

A trace of 2 inches of snow is forecast for the northern Utah valleys and 3 to 7 inches in the mountain passes.

The storm is not expected to make the air crystal clear at lower elevations, but it is expected to improve air quality. According to the Utah Air Quality Division, Salt Lake, Cache, Davis, Tooele, Utah and Weber/Box Elder counties are expected to move to yellow/moderate air on Friday.

In Salt Lake City, the National Weather Service predicts a 70 percent chance of snow Friday, mostly before 8 a.m., with 1 to 3 inches of accumulation possible. Daytime temperatures will be in the low to mid 30s, with nighttime lows in the 20s.

Once the storm leaves Utah, there won’t be another in the forecast until the middle of next week. Expect mostly sunny skies, daytime highs in the low to mid 30s and overnight lows in the low 20s – and reversals should occur.

Southern Utah is in even more of a weather rut. The Thursday-Friday storm will not reach St. George, where the forecast is for sunny skies with highs in the mid-50s and overnight lows in the 30s through Wednesday.

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Salt lake city

Utah adds more than 39,000 new COVID-19 cases and 28 deaths

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – The Utah Department of Health is reporting 39,882 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday, Jan. 18, and 28 new deaths since Friday.

Case

With 39,882 new cases of COVID-19 reported, the total number of cases in Utah reached 790,216.

Of today’s new cases, 8,490 are school-aged children. The UDOH reports 2,556 cases in children aged 5 to 10, 1,875 cases in children aged 11 to 13, and 4,059 cases in children aged 14 to 17.

Vaccines

A total of 4,723,232 doses of vaccine have been administered in Utah.

This is an increase of 27,470 doses since Friday.

Vaccinated vs. unvaccinated risk ratio

Over the past 28 days, unvaccinated people are 13.3 times more likely to die from COVID-19, 6.1 times more likely to be hospitalized due to COVID-19, and 2.3 times more risks of testing positive for COVID-19 than vaccinated people.

As of February 1, 2021, unvaccinated people have a 6.8 times greater risk of dying from COVID-19, a 4.9 times greater risk of being hospitalized due to COVID-19, and a 1.6 times higher of testing positive for COVID-19 than vaccinated people.

Laboratory tests

Utah Department of Health lab reports show 4,611,947 people have been tested. This is an increase of 78,112 since Friday.

The UDOH reports a total of 8,484,276 total tests, an increase of 151,176 tests since Friday.

Tendencies

The 7-day rolling average for positive tests is 10,652 per day.

The 7-day rolling average of “people over people” positivity percentage is 41.3%. The 7-day moving average of the percentage of positivity of “tests on tests” is 29%.

Hospitalizations

There are 681 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19. The total number of hospitalizations since the start of the epidemic is 29,496.

Death

There are 3,979 total deaths, 28 more than Friday.

  1. Male, over 85, resident of Salt Lake County, not hospitalized at time of death
  2. Male, 25-44, Salt Lake County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  3. Male, 45-64, Utah County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  4. Male, 45-64, Salt Lake County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  5. Male, 45-64, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  6. Female, age 85+, resident of Davis County, hospitalized at time of death
  7. Female, 45-64, resident of Weber County, hospitalized at time of death
  8. Male, 65-84, Utah County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  9. Male, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  10. Male, 65-84, resident of Salt Lake County, not hospitalized at time of death
  11. Male, 65-84, resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  12. Male, over 85, resident of Washington County, hospitalized at time of death
  13. Female, 65-84, resident of Weber County, resident of a long-term care facility
  14. Male, 85+, Cache County resident, not hospitalized at time of death
  15. Male, over 85, resident of Sevier County. not hospitalized at time of death
  16. Female, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  17. Female, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  18. Male, 45-64, Davis County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  19. Female, age 85+, resident of Washington County, hospitalized at time of death
  20. Male, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  21. Female, 65-84, resident of Uintah County, hospitalized at time of death
  22. Male, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  23. Male, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County, not hospitalized at time of death
  24. Male, 65-84, Utah County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  25. Male, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County. hospitalized at time of death
  26. Male, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  27. Male, 65-84, Utah County resident, not hospitalized at time of death
  28. Female, 65-84, resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death

Today vs Wednesday

Today Friday
Total Utahns Testing Positive 790 216 750,334
Total number of people tested 4,611,947 4,533,835
Utah COVID-19 Deaths 3,979 3,951
Vaccines administered 4,723,232 4,695,762
Utahns currently hospitalized with COVID-19 681 672
Total hospitalizations 29,496 29,029
Courtesy of UDOH
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Utah economy

LeBron James Stat Sheet with 25 PTS, 7 REB and 7 AST vs. Jazz 💪


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ESPN released this video article, titled “LeBron James stuffs stat sheet with 25 PTS, 7 REB & 7 AST vs. Jazz 💪” – their description is below.

LeBron James had 25 PTS, 7 REB and 7 AST for the Los Angeles Lakers in their win over the Utah Jazz.

ESPN YouTube channel

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In this story: LeBron James

LeBron Raymone James Sr. is an American professional basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He is widely regarded as one of the greatest basketball players in NBA history.

James’ teams have played in eight consecutive NBA Finals (2011-2018) and ten finals in total between the Miami Heat, Cleveland Cavaliers and Lakers. His accomplishments include three NBA championships, four NBA Most Valuable Player (MVP) awards, three Finals MVP awards, and two Olympic gold medals.

James holds the all-time record for playoff points, is third in all-time points and eighth in all-time assists. James was selected to the All-NBA First Team a record thirteen times, made the All-Defensive First Team five times, and played in sixteen All-Star Games, during which he was selected MVP All -Star.

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  • In this story: Utah

    Utah is a state in the western United States.

    The territory of modern Utah has been inhabited by various indigenous groups for thousands of years, including the ancient Puebloans, Navajo, and Ute. The Spaniards were the first Europeans to arrive in the mid-16th century, although the region’s harsh geography and climate made it a peripheral part of New Spain and later Mexico.

    Disputes between the dominant Mormon community and the federal government delayed Utah’s admission as a state; it was only after polygamy was banned that she was admitted as the 45th, in 1896.

    Just over half of all Utahns are Mormons, the vast majority of whom are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), with world headquarters in Salt Lake City. Utah is the only state where the majority of the population belongs to a single church. The LDS Church greatly influences Utahn’s culture, politics, and daily life, although since the 1990s the state has become more religiously and secularly diverse.

    The state has a very diverse economy, with major sectors such as transportation, education, information technology and research, government services and mining and a major tourist destination for outdoor recreation air.

    A 2012 national Gallup survey found Utah to be the overall “best state to live in the future” based on 13 forward-looking measures, including various measures of economic outlook, lifestyle, and health.

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    Salt lake city government

    Governor Cox, Utah Legislators Form Diversity and Inclusion Task Force for K-12 Education

    Rep. Sandra Hollins, D-Salt Lake City, is one of the lawmakers who helped launch a diversity and inclusion program at K-12 schools in Utah. (Shafkat Anowar, Deseret News)

    Estimated reading time: 2-3 minutes

    SALT LAKE CITY — Utah leaders announced Monday the creation of a new task force that will focus on diversity and inclusion in the classroom. The announcement took place at the southwest corner of the Utah State Capitol, near the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. plaque.

    “There is strength in our diversity,” Governor Spencer Cox said in a statement on the bipartisan task force. “I look forward to working with this group to find ways to make every child in every school feel valued and respected.”

    Several elected officials will create a task force to embed a diversity program in K-12 schools across the state, according to a press release from the Utah House of Representatives. The Utah Diversity and Inclusion Commission will be chaired by House Majority Leader Rep. Mike Schultz, Rep. Sandra Hollins, Sen. Kirk Cullimore and Sen. Luz Escamilla. The task force will include not only legislators, but also educators and community leaders.

    “In an effort to create a Utah we can all be proud of, we are embarking on a path to embed a diversity and inclusion curriculum into our K-12 education system,” Schultz said in a statement. “As a bipartisan group, we will take a balanced approach and work together to better understand and find ways to create a better future for our children and grandchildren.”

    The group will work closely with the Utah State Board of Education to develop an appropriate curriculum for children, according to the release.

    “I look forward to working with my colleagues to develop possible solutions to ensure that all of our young people feel safe and welcome in our schools,” Hollins said in the statement.

    Cullimore and Hollins worked on the legislation to make the task force a reality. The group will be formed during the 2022 legislative session in Utah.

    “As education continues to be a key equalizer for our state and our country, the opportunity to help shape a comprehensive and inclusive curriculum – encompassing the full history and diversity of our state – is essential,” said Escamilla said in the statement. “The opportunity to present a variety of perspectives, working towards this goal, makes this an exciting time.”

    The band’s announcement comes on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a celebration of the civil rights icon’s life and legacy. Many events in the state have commemorated King’s life, including marches in Ogden and Salt Lake City, as well as events hosted by local NAACP chapters.

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    Salt lake city

    Mountaineer turned conservationist Rick Reese leaves a monumental outdoor legacy

    Pioneering educator-activist and Salt Lake City native dies at 79 after a life of saving lives and landscapes.

    (Todd Wilkinson | Mountain Journal) Rick Reese, pictured on the Bonneville Shoreline Trail above Salt Lake City, was a pioneering environmental activist, outdoor educator and mountaineer. The Utah native, who helped found the Greater Yellowstone Coalition and the Utah nonprofit that established the famous trail along the shore of ancient Lake Bonneville, died on 9 January 2022 at age 79.

    Editor’s note • This story is only available to Salt Lake Tribune subscribers. Please support local journalism.

    Rick Reese, who influenced a generation or two of environmental activists, outdoor educators and mountaineers in his native Utah and beyond, died Jan. 9 at his home in Montana. During his 79 years, he built a conservation legacy that celebrated a broader view of what environmental protection means and led to the creation of Utah’s beloved Bonneville Coastal Trail.

    While Reese was best known for his activism in Montana, as co-founder of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, he was one of the native sons of Salt Lake City who pushed the boundaries of Wasatch climbing when the sport was in its infancy, according to longtime friend and climbing partner Ted Wilson.

    Wilson remembers first meeting young Reese when Reese was still a student at East High School and had just returned from climbing Mount Rainier in Washington. That was in 1959 and they have remained close friends ever since, sharing many adventures and occasional disagreements.

    Over the years of setting up routes in the Wasatch, Wilson observed how Reese combined courage and physical strength with caution.

    “He could do both at the same time. He approached life that way,” said Wilson, who became mayor of Salt Lake City. “He was strong, but he understood that there were forces bigger than himself, in life and in climbing, that he had to honor. He did it with pure principles.

    Reese was born in Salt Lake City in 1942. Fresh out of high school, he joined the National Guard and was deployed to Germany during the Berlin Airlift, according to Reese’s obituary. He returned home to study political science at the University of Utah, where he met his wife Mary Lee, and later graduate school at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. .

    Reece would later serve in the United States as Director of Community Relations. While pursuing his undergraduate studies, he worked summers as a climbing ranger at Grand Teton National Park and later pioneered routes in the Wasatch that remain unmatched to this day.

    “The thinnest line of the Wasatch for traditional climbers and the most natural line is Triple overhangs which he created in the 1960s in the Lone Peak Circus” with Fred Beckey and Bob Irvine, said Peter Metcalf, co-founder of Black Diamond Equipment. “But when it comes to conservation, his legacy is incredible. He was one of Utah’s greatest conservationists, if not the greatest in Utah history, not to mention a pioneer mountaineer.

    As park rangers in the 1960s, Reese and his colleagues invented the techniques, virtually on the fly, to rescue people in vertical terrain. Along with Wilson, Pete Sinclair and four other rangers, he pulled off what is considered “the most advanced, technical, daring and courageous rescue” on the Grand Teton North Face in 1967, according to Metcalf. This feat was commemorated in a 2013 film, The great rescue, by Wilson’s daughter Jenny Wilson and Meredith Lavitt.

    “Reese was known as the best climber on the team,” said Reece’s biography for the film. “It was not just his ability to move quickly over mountainous terrain that set him apart, but also his calmness when things got serious.”

    The Rees then moved to Helena, Montana in 1970 with their children Paige and Seth while Reece taught at Carroll College. In Montana, the couple were recruited to lead the Yellowstone Institute by Yellowstone Park Superintendent John Townsley.

    It was this experience that helped Reese refine his famous idea of ​​a “Greater Yellowstone”.

    “When we were Jenny Lake rangers, he was like, ‘Yellowstone and Teton [national parks] are great places, but they need to be bigger. These animals do not stop at the border; they graze, the grizzly is threatened. We have to protect their food sources,” Wilson said. “And he went on and on about it, and he just kept talking to people. He met with the Park Service folks and expanded the idea.

    This led to the creation of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition in 1983, promoting the concept that protecting Yellowstone also means protecting the ecosystem surrounding the two national parks.

    “He made it a strength for a new wilderness,” Wilson said. “There’s a lot of new wilderness up there because of Rick.”

    It was this kind of thinking that inspired the designation of vast Western national monuments—Missouri River Breaks, Basin and Range, Grand Staircase-Escalante, and Bears Ears—that sought to protect entire landscapes.

    Reese confused later mountain diary with journalist Todd Wilkinson, who continues to report on the relationship between the people and the land of the Greater Yellowstone region.

    Reese also served as a mentor and advisor for Save Our Canyons, according to executive director Carl Fisher, who relied on Reese’s advice to push back development in the Wasatch Central Range.

    “His love of Western landscapes is rooted in the Wasatch,” Fisher said. “He went on to accomplish great things.”

    Among these was the creation of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail Committee in the 1990s with Jim Byrne to develop the now famous path following the contours of the former Bonneville lake. Today, the trail is used daily by thousands of Wasatch Front residents seeking respite from nature on the edge of Utah’s bustling cityscape.

    Celebrations of Reese’s life will be held this spring in Bozeman, Montana, and Salt Lake City.

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    Salt lake city government

    Lawmakers seek to stop governments and HOAs from enforcing plush lawns

    Some Utah lawmakers are aiming to change rules that allow government agencies and homeowners associations to tax plush lawns. (Best Seller, Shutterstock)

    Estimated reading time: 2-3 minutes

    SALT LAKE CITY—Last summer, politicians pleaded with Utahans to conserve water. But as KSL investigators found, that hasn’t stopped some homeowners associations or government entities from enforcing their rules for residents to keep lawns lush. Now some lawmakers aim to change that.

    West Valley City‘s Jason McHann learned last summer that he was breaking the law by abandoning his lawn. “Pretty frustrated,” McHann said after being slapped with a city repair ticket. “We are doing what we should be doing to be responsible citizens.”

    The city demanded that he water his lawn more or face a fine. “We had to water 45 minutes a day to keep it nice and green,” he said.

    Now there’s pressure from two state lawmakers to ban officials from demanding lawns.

    “Another way to put it is that these organizations should give the person at least one other option, besides the lawn,” said State Representative Ray Ward.

    The Bountiful Republican said its bill, HB 95, was inspired by fear of what would happen if the Great Salt Lake dried up.

    “If we’re ever going to have that lake there, we need to do a better job of conservation,” he said.

    Ward explained that his bill would still allow cities to impose rules requiring landscaping to be neat and attractive.


    Besides the lawn, there are many other ways to make your home look nice.

    -Representing. Ray ward


    “The point everyone is making is’ I don’t want this other person’s house to reduce the value of my property because it looks like a dump,” he said. “And that’s understandable. This neighborhood wouldn’t want the house next door to look like a dump. It affects them. But there are plenty of other ways besides the lawn to make your house look beautiful.”

    The other bill is led by Republican Rep. Robert Spendlove from Sandy. His bill, HB 121, would actually make people who tear up their gas-guzzling lawns to put on something better suited to Utah’s desert climate.

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