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Analysis of the news of March 14, 2022

99.1% of close contacts of patients infected with Omicron diagnosed within 10 days

Last weekend at Emerging infectious diseasesSouth Korean researchers reported that the average time from exposure to diagnosis of COVID-19 was 3.7 days among quarantined close contacts of patients infected with the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant and that 99, 1% of diagnoses occurred on day 10, supporting a 10-day quarantine period.

The study assessed the time from exposure to diagnosis among 107 close contacts from two Omicron groups on November 24 and 25, 2021. In South Korea, close contacts of Omicron patients were mandated to self-quarantine for 14 days amid surges, regardless of symptoms and vaccination status. Contacts were tested for COVID-19 on days 1, 9 and 13.

The average time between exposure and diagnosis was 3.7 days. Of all contacts, 50% were diagnosed on day 3, while 70% were diagnosed on day 5 and 99.1% on day 10. One diagnosis occurred on day 13 in an unvaccinated child who had previously been tested negative.

Half of contacts in all age groups were diagnosed on day 3. Among contacts with symptoms of COVID-19, half of diagnoses occurred on day 3 and 70% on day 5. Diagnoses of COVID-19 19 among contacts without symptoms occurred in 50% on day 5 and 70% on day 8.

The results of the study led the South Korean government to shorten the quarantine from 14 to 10 days and to 7 days in times of limited capacity due to surge in quarantine facilities.

The researchers noted that unpublished data from a previous study suggested that Omicron’s incubation period may be shorter than that of the Delta variant. “Estimating the duration of infectivity is more difficult than measuring incubation periods; a study that measured viral load from Omicron suggested that viral load fell by 10-13 days, which is consistent with our findings.

While the most effective COVID-19 containment measures are isolation and quarantine, the authors noted that these strategies come with personal and socioeconomic costs. “A 10-day quarantine period can encompass most people exposed to Omicron; however, the duration of quarantine may become shorter after balancing the societal cost with the public health benefits,” they concluded.
March 11 Urgent disinfection search letter

Support tool related to better antibiotic prescribing for pneumonia patients

A real-time electronic decision support tool has helped community hospital clinicians provide best care practices to emergency department patients with pneumonia and has been associated with a decrease in intensive care unit admissions (ICU), more appropriate use of antibiotics and an overall 38% reduction in deaths according to a study last week in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

For the study, researchers at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City, Utah, deployed the healthcare system’s electronic open-loop clinical decision support (ePNa) system in 16 of its community hospitals in December 2017 to June 2019. During this period, these hospitals had 6,848 cases of pneumonia and a treating clinician used ePNa in 67% of eligible patients.

The support tool brings together more than 50 key patient indicators, including age, fever, oxygen saturation, lab and chest imaging results, and vital signs to make care decisions, including appropriate antibiotic therapy, laboratory studies, and treatment setting recommendations, such as admission to intensive care. , hospital admission or discharge. The median patient age was 67, 48% were female, and 64.8% were admitted to hospital.

Using the tool, Intermountain researchers found a range of positive patient outcomes, including a 38% relative reduction in mortality 30 days after a pneumonia diagnosis, with the largest reduction in mortality rates in patients admitted directly from the emergency department to the ICU. Guideline-compliant antibiotic prescribing increased from 83.5% to 90.2% (P

Other results were a 61% increase in the number of patients treated on an outpatient basis (from 29.2% to 46.9%), a decrease in admissions to intensive care without safety problems and a reduction in the average time between admission to emergency and the start of the first antibiotic, going from 159.4 minutes to 150.9 minutes.

The researchers say the results are consistent with a previous study involving the use of the ePNa system in large Intermountain hospitals.

“Our study found that clinicians were able to make better treatment decisions with this resource,” first author Nathan Dean, MD, said in an Intermountain press release. “Some of our community hospitals have as few as 20 beds. We wanted to validate the effectiveness of ePNa in very different healthcare settings.”
March 9 Am J Respir Crit Care Med study
March 9 Intermountain Healthcare Press release

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Salt lake city

Man arrested nearly 25 years after kidnapping and assault in Salt Lake City

A man who has been on a warrant for nearly 25 years accusing him of kidnapping and sexually assaulting a woman in Salt Lake City has been arrested in California.

An arrest warrant was issued for Jaime Diaz Calderon, 46, in June 1997, charging him with aggravated kidnapping and two counts of aggravated sexual assault, felonies in the first degree; and robbery, a second-degree felony.

On April 7, 1997, Calderon kidnapped a woman he knew at gunpoint from Salt Lake City International Airport and sexually assaulted her at an undisclosed location in Salt Lake City, according to a statement released Thursday by Salt Lake Police. Court records show that Calderon lived near 1650 west and 600 south at the time.

Police quickly identified Calderon as a suspect and criminal charges were filed against him just two months after the alleged assault.

But he never showed up for a scheduled court hearing and a warrant was issued for his arrest. His warrant was in the National Crime Information Center database, which means that if Calderon was ever arrested or arrested anywhere in the United States, the law enforcement agency that contacted him would be informed of his mandate.

According to a press release issued by the Marin County Sheriff’s Office in northern California, detectives from the department’s Specialized Investigations Unit recently received information that Calderon was wanted in Salt Lake City and possibly lived in their county. The statement did not say how police were notified that Calderon was in their county.

“Detectives from (this unit) conducted surveillance, coordinated with the San Rafael Police Department, and were able to safely arrest Calderon. Calderon was taken into custody at the Marin County Jail as a fugitive from justice (Tuesday),” according to the ministry’s statement.

On Thursday, Salt Lake police were in the process of extraditing Calderon to Utah.

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Utah economy

Presidio’s Steve Perry Becomes Salt Lake 2022 Board Chair

NORTH SALT LAKE, Utah – January 28, 2022 – (Newswire.com)

Presidio Real Estate is honored to announce that Steve Perry, COO of Presidio, will serve a one-year term as Chairman of the Salt Lake Board of Realtors® for 2022. This prestigious role is one of many for which Steve s is volunteered. His experience includes military service and being mayor of a city as well as law enforcement. Additional roles Steve fills this year include serving on the board of directors for the Utah Association of Realtors® and the National Association of Realtors®. Steve’s commitment to helping people and making a difference is unmatched. His involvement in the community is evident as he continues to serve the people through his role as President. Steve has been a consistent major contributor to the Realtor® Political Action Committee.

Jennifer Yeo, Owner of Presidio, said, “Steve is a proven and effective leader who has the full support of Presidio to lead the largest Board of Realtors® in the State of Utah and to achieve its goal to “raise the bar” in real estate this year. . Steve wants to improve professionalism on our board. “Realtors® should be experts when it comes to writing contracts, understanding market values ​​and helping their clients,” Steve said. He continues: “By taking continuing education courses and brokers training their agents, we can all grow together.

Utah was the fastest growing state in 2021, measured by percentage growth. Steve’s view is that Real Estate Agents® play a vital role in home ownership. With the changing economy, the complexity of buying and selling a home has never been more difficult. There are so many legal aspects that need to be considered and executed appropriately to avoid the risks and pitfalls that can arise when buying or selling without Realtor®. Steve is committed to helping Salt Lake Council officers understand their value proposition and instill professionalism in their practices.

Steve is a family man. With his wife April, Steve has six children and six grandchildren. Steve enjoys playing sports with his children such as pickleball, spike ball and crossnet. They also enjoy fishing trips, hiking, and enjoying nature in the beautiful state of Utah.

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Presidio’s Steve Perry Becomes Salt Lake 2022 Board Chair

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Salt lake city government

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints sends supplies to Tonga after volcanic eruption

The island nation has the highest percentage of Latter-day Saints in the world.

This photo provided by Broadcom Broadcasting shows a damaged area in Nuku’alofa, Tonga, Thursday, Jan. 20, 2022, following Saturday’s volcanic eruption near the Pacific archipelago. The first flight carrying fresh water and other aid to Tonga was finally able to depart on Thursday after the Pacific nation’s main airport runway was cleared of ash left over from the eruption. (Marian Kupu/Broadcom Broadcast via AP)

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is sending aid to the Kingdom of Tonga after last week’s volcanic eruption caused tsunamis, rockfalls and a communications blackout.

In a press release from the Utah-based church, officials said they have reached out to leaders in Tonga over the past 24 hours and are working to understand the extent of the region’s needs. Tonga has the highest percentage of Latter-day Saints of any country in the world (nearly 63%), and a ferry with 30 tons of supplies donated by other Mormon congregations left for the Ha’apai Islands on Saturday. from the country.

According to the Associated Press, at least three people died after the explosion and several settlements on the small islands of the archipelago were “wiped off the map”. About 15 families are still staying at the church-run Liahona High School with nowhere to go, the statement said, but they could move into nearby chapels once the school reopens.

On Friday, the church’s ruling First Presidency sent a letter to Latter-day Saints in Tonga, reminding them that the church will be with them throughout the island’s recovery. Another letter was due to be delivered to the King and Queen of Tonga on Saturday.

“As you recover from the devastating volcanic eruption and ensuing tsunami, and from all that you have endured and are enduring, know that your holy brothers and other people of faith and goodwill in the world people are praying for you,” Presidents Russell M. Nelson, Dallin H. Oaks, and Henry B. Eyring wrote. “We pray that the Lord will pour blessings on each of you, that your hearts will be soothed and strengthened, that your families and homes will be restored and refreshed, and that your communities will become peaceful and beautiful again.

A second supply ferry will be sent to the country’s outlying islands on Wednesday. Supplies have already been sent to communities on the west side of Nuku’alofa – Tonga’s capital – and Eua Island, both of which were hard hit by the tsunami, the statement said.

Tonga Outer Islands Mission church leaders are on their way to Ha’apai with 35 returned missionaries who will help deliver supplies, including a satellite phone that was used in Eua until telephone service from l island be restored. Fuel for the mission boats will also be delivered to Ha’apai to distribute supplies to some of the smaller islands.

Although stores across the country remain open and stocked, they are rapidly running out of essentials, the statement said. Government officials are working to clear shipping channels to the country’s capital so large ships can dock, while domestic flights to two of the country’s island systems – Vaava’u and Ha’apai – are operational.

Those wishing to support the people of Tonga can donate to the church’s humanitarian fund, the statement said, which is available here.

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Utah economy

Michigan business leaders say state lags in economic growth

Michigan leaders must set aside political differences to create a cohesive economic development strategy because the state is expected to fall further behind the others in economic growth, according to Business Leaders for Michigan.

The State Affairs Roundtable on Thursday shared its annual benchmarking, which placed Michigan 29th in economic growth of the 50 states after some revamped measures that now include more measures ranging from education level to perception of the business climate through poverty.

The ranking is an improvement from the Great Recession, but that ranking could worsen in coming years if the organization’s projections are true. The gap between Michigan’s economy and the nation’s, when pegged to 2008 levels, has widened 22% during the pandemic since 2019. The difference could increase another 73% by 2030. , leaving the Great Lakes state even further behind.

“There needs to be certainty and consistency in our approach to economic development,” Roundtable CEO Jeff Donofrio told the Detroit News. “Often, not just in economic development, but particularly in economic development, our strategy seems to pivot every time an office holder changes hands, so a new governor comes in or a new legislature comes in.

“Sometimes we put things in place, and there’s a big ribbon cutting or a press release or a sensational event, and then a few years later we pull the funding for it.”

The goal is to be in the top 10 states. This group currently includes Utah, Washington, Colorado, Texas, Massachusetts, Virginia, California, Oregon, Florida and Arizona. All show strong results in terms of economic growth, education and talent.

The forecast comes at a critical time, especially for the state’s auto industry which is undergoing a historic transformation toward electric vehicles with billions of dollars in investment and thousands of jobs at stake. Michigan is underserved. strong for battery factories with just two of the 12 announced in North America and six more with locations on hold, according to the roundtable. The state has about a quarter of internal combustion engine jobs in the United States, and electric vehicles have fewer parts.

By 2025, 43% of Michigan’s 14 assembly plants, or six plants in total, will produce electric vehicles, compared to 37% nationally, according to the analysis. Nearly 170,000 of the 290,000 automotive jobs are potentially affected by the passage of the ICEs, including 46,110 directly affected in 310 companies.

General Motors Co. is looking to manufacture batteries on its Lansing Delta Township plant property, and LG Energy Solution plans to invest in its battery plant in Holland. Meanwhile, Ford Motor Co. last year announced an $11.4 billion investment to manufacture electric vehicles and batteries in Tennessee and Kentucky, sparking a public spat with the governor. Gretchen Whitmer. But the State of Tennessee worked for 20 years to prepare the huge site chosen by Ford for investment.

“Let’s look at Tennessee,” Donofrio said, noting that the state has fallen from 34th to 16th place in the benchmark analysis over the past five years. “They’ve been persistent, but they’ve also had single-party control of the governor and legislature, which makes it a little easier, doesn’t it? They’re not constantly fighting each other every two-year cycle.

“We need to put aside our political differences and do more of what we saw in December,” Donofrio said, referring to the state’s bipartisan effort to spend $1.5 billion on economic development.

The “Michigan talent crunch,” according to the roundtable, also contributes to the potential economic loss. Michigan is aging and could lose nearly 120,000 working-age people between 2020 and 2030. The state has also lost a higher percentage of labor force participation than the country amid the pandemic — nearly erasing the gains it had made since the Great Recession.

“We’re 41st in the country when it comes to labor force participation,” Donofrio said. “Our growth rate is 44th, so that means we’re going to struggle to maintain our position, not just grow.”

Innovation has also been a headwind for Michigan in terms of the number of entrepreneurs and startups here and their survival rate.

More positive was educational attainment, whose growth kept pace with the top 10 states. Michigan’s ranking for the percentage of residents with a college degree or certification is expected to rise from 35th to 20th place over the next year; state programs like Reconnect or Going Pro are meant to get the one million residents who don’t have a degree to get one for free at community college or update worker skills and certifications.

K-12 test scores, however, fell 8% year-over-year, and that’s likely with inflated results because not all districts were required to take the exams during the year. pandemic-hit 2020-21 school year, according to Business Leaders for Michigan.

Wolverine State has the opportunity to invest to improve long-term results, Donofrio said. The top 10 states spend about $2,000 more per student than Michigan. With COVID-19 relief funds available, Michigan has an opportunity to use this money to consolidate administrative services and duplicate school departments, install air conditioning in buildings to offer after-school and summer programs, and train teachers. .

“If we come together, if we do more things like we did in December around economic development, that we did around setting up places to reconnect and the Going Pro program, if we double those things, if we persist with a strategy to help us become a top 10 state, those investments that the legislature can make in the coming months,” Donofrio said, “will help put us on that path that will help us leapfrog other states and really accelerate our growth.

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Twitter: @BreanaCNoble

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Salt lake city government

Governor Cox, Utah Legislators Form Diversity and Inclusion Task Force for K-12 Education

Rep. Sandra Hollins, D-Salt Lake City, is one of the lawmakers who helped launch a diversity and inclusion program at K-12 schools in Utah. (Shafkat Anowar, Deseret News)

Estimated reading time: 2-3 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah leaders announced Monday the creation of a new task force that will focus on diversity and inclusion in the classroom. The announcement took place at the southwest corner of the Utah State Capitol, near the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. plaque.

“There is strength in our diversity,” Governor Spencer Cox said in a statement on the bipartisan task force. “I look forward to working with this group to find ways to make every child in every school feel valued and respected.”

Several elected officials will create a task force to embed a diversity program in K-12 schools across the state, according to a press release from the Utah House of Representatives. The Utah Diversity and Inclusion Commission will be chaired by House Majority Leader Rep. Mike Schultz, Rep. Sandra Hollins, Sen. Kirk Cullimore and Sen. Luz Escamilla. The task force will include not only legislators, but also educators and community leaders.

“In an effort to create a Utah we can all be proud of, we are embarking on a path to embed a diversity and inclusion curriculum into our K-12 education system,” Schultz said in a statement. “As a bipartisan group, we will take a balanced approach and work together to better understand and find ways to create a better future for our children and grandchildren.”

The group will work closely with the Utah State Board of Education to develop an appropriate curriculum for children, according to the release.

“I look forward to working with my colleagues to develop possible solutions to ensure that all of our young people feel safe and welcome in our schools,” Hollins said in the statement.

Cullimore and Hollins worked on the legislation to make the task force a reality. The group will be formed during the 2022 legislative session in Utah.

“As education continues to be a key equalizer for our state and our country, the opportunity to help shape a comprehensive and inclusive curriculum – encompassing the full history and diversity of our state – is essential,” said Escamilla said in the statement. “The opportunity to present a variety of perspectives, working towards this goal, makes this an exciting time.”

The band’s announcement comes on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a celebration of the civil rights icon’s life and legacy. Many events in the state have commemorated King’s life, including marches in Ogden and Salt Lake City, as well as events hosted by local NAACP chapters.

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Salt lake city

SLC International’s New USO Airport Center Provides Comfort for On-the-Go Military


Travel-weary military service men and women and their families will have some respite from the chaos and hustle and bustle of air travel with the new USO Airport Center at Salt Lake International Airport.

The new airport hub will provide support to military personnel and families serving, training and traveling in Utah.

The United Service Organizations, or USO, smoothly opened the new facility in December last year and are planning a grand opening of the airport hub on February 4, according to a press release on Friday.

The 933-square-foot facility will include comfortable furniture for resting, computers and Wi-Fi, free snacks and drinks, luggage storage, and a lounge area with TV entertainment, movies and games. family.

“The larger airport has allowed us to provide an exceptional location and space for our military men and women,” said Bill Wyatt, executive director of the Salt Lake City Airports Department. “We hope that military personnel who connect through SLC will find rest and relaxation here and that it will make their travels more enjoyable.

The military are no strangers to long travel days with several stopovers. When an enlisted member receives travel or relocation orders, they often ship them ahead of other family members, leaving spouses and children through the hardships of travel without the assistance of their partners.

The new airport center hopes to alleviate some of the stress of travel.

ALSO: Navy expands training camp to focus more on character issues

In addition to downtown airport amenities, USO Utah will provide support operations and program delivery to the state’s five military bases. Support operations include USO bridging programs, emotional wellness programs, children’s camps and family days, officials said.

“I am excited to share a little bit of Utah with every visitor to the new USO Center,” said new USO Utah Operations and Programs Director Nate Vandenberg.

USO Utah is seeking volunteers to join the team of more than 30,000 USO volunteers who support local military service members and their families. Those interested in donating or volunteering should visit utah.uso.org.


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Utah economy

Utah House Majority: Great Salt Lake Recession Could Cost State Billions | Utah

(The Center Square) – Utah’s Great Salt Lake has fallen 20.35 feet since 1986 and a continued decline could have devastating effects on the state’s economy, according to a Social media video posted Monday by the Utah House Majority, a week before a summit that is expected to discuss the impact of the lake’s decline.

The lake’s continued recession could cost 6,500 jobs and up to $ 2 billion a year, according to the video.

Speaker of the House Brad Wilson of R-Kaysville hosts the Grand Lac Salé Summit on January 5. It will include conservationists, industry leaders and state lawmakers “to discuss possible policy solutions to ensure that the Great Salt Lake is preserved for future generations to enjoy”, Wilson said in a Twitter post.

The state’s problems would go beyond environmental concerns if the lake continues to recede, according to the video. Snowfall could decrease by 27 to 45 inches per year, costing the ski industry up to $ 9.6 million per year.

Dust from the lake could release unhealthy levels of arsenic, lithium and zirconium in the area, causing hardship for residents.

The lake’s decline is said to be exacerbated by the increase in the state’s population, which is expected to double by 2065 and will require more water from the lake, according to the video.

The lake issue is also being addressed by federal lawmakers. U.S. Representative Blake Moore, R-Utah, co-sponsors the Law on the ecosystems of saline lakes in the States of the Great Basin. The bill would provide resources for scientists and federal officials to monitor salt lakes and recommend management and conservation programs.

“Utah’s Great Salt Lake is a critically important ecosystem, habitat, and tourism and business engine,” Moore said in a press release earlier this year. “But today, its water levels are at an all-time low, leading to habitat loss, decreased water flows and air quality issues.”

The bill was passed by the House committee on natural resources.

Republican US Senator Mitt Romney introduced a similar bill in the US Senate.

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Salt lakes real estate

Housing Market, Labor Shortages and Supply Chain Problems: Economic Year in Review | Local


TWIN FALLS – It’s been a roller coaster year for the economy of south-central Idaho.

The housing market has been described as a “perfect storm” by realtors, appraisers and builders. Restaurants struggled to find employees. And supply chain shortages have affected all industries.

“All of these challenges, I wish we had a quick fix to solve them all, but they all seem to be related,” said Shawn Barigar, president of the Twin Falls Chamber of Commerce.

Some of those challenges may linger into the New Year and others are showing signs of abating, Barigar said. The chamber expects tourism to pick up in 2022, with international travel becoming an option again.

The board expects more international travelers from Asia to come on sightseeing buses en route to Yellowstone.

On the other hand, the housing market could face the same problems as this year.

“Looks like another wild ride for this coming year,” said Stan Tobiason, owner of Super Realty.

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In May, house prices in Twin Falls were up 29.4% since 2020. The median price for a single-family home reached $ 320,000.

In September and October, things started to improve for the first time in 14 months, Tobiason said.

“It was so much fun having good news for buyers and telling them up front that they don’t have to try seven to eight times,” he said.

This brief reprieve did not last long.

In November, homes began to sell instantly, inventory began to decline, and sellers began to receive several offers again.

Realtor.com has ranked Salt Lake City and Boise as the top two housing markets positioned for growth in 2022. With Twin Falls in the middle, Tobiason also expects strong growth here.

Supply shortages were another factor plaguing the housing industry. During the summer, wood was a limiting factor and now it’s something else.

“Garage doors have been out of stock for several months,” he said. “There is still a missing component.

The Chamber of Commerce had direct experience with delivery delays in 2021.

In September 2020, they ordered bikes for rent at the visitor center.

“We finally got them in September 2021, so it took 12 months to get bikes available,” Barigar said.

The auto industry has been hit particularly hard by shipping delays and supply chain shortages, he said.

Christian Robinson, general sales manager for Twin Falls Subaru, said new car production volume recently declined by 30%.

“I ordered a car for a customer the other day and it won’t be there until May,” Robinson said.

The world still faces a shortage of semiconductor chips that will most likely continue until 2022, he said. Multiple factors, including the pandemic, have led to a lack of inventory.

The chips used in automobiles are the same as in digital devices, such as televisions and video game systems. As a result of working from home and quarantines, more and more people were buying technology instead of a new vehicle, he said.

Buying used vehicles has helped the dealership maintain a significant supply of options for customers, he said.

“As you drive around town some lots seem to have closed,” Robinson said.

Another challenge facing the auto industry was labor shortages. Some delays in the inventory can be attributed to the lack of staff at the train stations to get the wagons off the trains.

I felt like almost every business in Twin Falls was hiring this year, Barigar said.

“You couldn’t drive on Blue Lakes without seeing help-seeking signs in every store along the way and it continues, exacerbated by housing issues,” he said.

The region has low unemployment and many employers need help

Although south-central Idaho’s unemployment rate has continued to decline, local recruiting agencies have struggled to find workers to fill the positions.

The unemployment rate in Twin Falls County was estimated at 2.1% in November. This is a number seasonally adjusted by the Idaho Department of Labor Statistics.

“Today if I had the people I could fill about 180 positions and that’s just in Magic Valley,” said Brenda Hedrick, branch manager for Ascend Staffing. Timetable-News in September.

Hedrick has worked in staffing for almost three decades and had never seen anything like it before. More employees started applying in the fall, but she feared that would change if COVID cases continued to rise.

To survive, some restaurants have chosen to reduce hours.

The Cove of Twin Falls, Scooter’s Chillin’-N-Grillin ‘and others posted on Facebook in August that long hours were wearing out their staff.

Debra Urrutia, owner of The Cove, said staff shortages were worse than COVID closures in 2020.

Telling customers when they walk in that the wait time is going to be more than an hour is difficult for a company’s reputation, Urrutia told the Timetable-News previously. Its small staff worked until 12 noon to cover missing employees.

Workforce shortage hits restaurants in Twin Falls

In November, for the first time since the start of the pandemic, the unemployment rate in south-central Idaho fell below its pre-pandemic level, according to the Department of Labor Statistics. Idaho.

“There is growing unease over increasing terminations, housing costs and inflationary pressures, all of which threaten to reverse much of this progress,” the Department of Labor Statistics said. from Idaho in a press release. “As we prepare to enter 2022, the pace of Idaho’s labor market recovery gives the impression that much of the damage caused by the pandemic will be recouped.”

Health care and social assistance, retailing and manufacturing experienced the greatest hiring difficulties, the statement said.

Barigar said that despite all the challenges, 2021 has turned out to be a good year. South-central Idaho has seen robust growth and new opportunities.

“Our community has come together in the past and we have a strong regional presence and a good stable economic base, especially in agriculture,” he said. “I think God willing there is snow in the mountains and water in the spring and we are all in good shape for the New Year.”


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Utah economy

Region 8 EPA Appointed KC Becker aims to restore protections abandoned under Trump

Stricter regulations for the oil and gas industry, clean air and water, and funding shortages are expected to be top priorities for KC Becker as she takes over as administrator for Region 8 of Environmental Protection Agency, conservationists and tribal officials said.

Not only should Becker, who is the former Colorado House chairman, help the federal agency rebuild the reduced protections under former President Donald Trump, advocates say, but she should also lobby to expand them further.

In her new role, Becker said she would oversee around 500 employees, help develop and enforce national policies to protect the environment and public health. It will also distribute millions of dollars in federal funding to help clean up contaminated areas, improve infrastructure and monitor polluting industries.

Becker’s Region 8 covers Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming. Three of those states – Colorado, North Dakota and Utah – have some of the fastest growing populations in the country, according to census data. And the region covers some of the country’s most valuable lands like Arches, Badlands, Glacier, Grand Teton, Rocky Mountain, and Yellowstone National Parks.

“Yes, there are these amazingly beautiful places,” said Stephanie Kodish, senior director and board of the National Parks Conservation Association.

But there are also some very significant challenges, Kodish added.

Becker said she was ready to meet these challenges, adding that climate change, environmental justice and degraded infrastructure were also high on her priority list. Federal officials do not want to provoke a “boost”, but will take stronger action than the last administration.

“No progress had been made in the past four years,” Becker told The Denver Post. “Really, I’m focused, and Administrator (EPA) (Michael) Regan is focused on making real changes on the ground that improve air quality, water quality, and the quality of life of the community. all.”

Dan Grossman, of the Environmental Defense Fund, said Becker is well suited for the role, especially as President Joe Biden’s administration moves away from the lax rules and regulations set by Trump’s EPA.

“I am very grateful that we are under new leadership,” said Grossman, who heads the national office of the environmental nonprofit Rocky Mountain. “We are already seeing a lot of progress.

Biden appointed Becker, a Democrat, to the post last month. For a limited term, she stepped down from the legislature last year, and her time at State House was marked by the promotion of aggressive climate action policies and a 2019 law revising industry regulations. state oil and gas. Democrats and environmentalists hailed the move, though industry leaders accused lawmakers behind the legislation of operating “in the middle of the night” and warned it could cripple the economy. the state.

Regulation of the oil and gas industry

Colorado, North Dakota and Wyoming are still home to “booming” oil and gas developments polluting the air, Kodish said. Industry, along with gasoline-powered vehicles, is one of the main sources of ozone pollution.

These pollution levels have peaked so high along the Front Range this year that the EPA is likely to downgrade Colorado’s air quality violator status from “severe” to “severe.”

Becker must not only work to tighten regulations on the industry, but she must also strengthen enforcement to force violators to reduce their emissions, Kodish said.

Colorado Oil & Gas President and CEO Dan Haley has repeatedly urged regulators to curb certain regulations – like continuous emissions monitoring requirements – and warned of rising fuel costs and the damage to an industry that produces millions of dollars for Colorado’s economy.

“Conversations about complicated technologies and emission reductions need to be rooted in facts, not scare tactics or guesses,” Haley said in a 2019 press release responding to new Oversight Commission regulations. air quality in the state.

Haley and other industry officials did not respond to messages seeking comment for this article.

Under the Biden administration, stricter industry regulations are already underway.

A plan released last month by the EPA would force oil and gas companies to detect and reduce methane emissions more aggressively. The goal is to reduce these emissions by 74% from 2005 levels by 2035.

Once the plan is finalized, individual states will likely have to draft plans to apply the new rules to businesses, Grossman said. And Becker will be able to act as a “validator” to ensure that the plans for the Region 8 states meet federal requirements.

New regulations must also take into account that communities of color and those whose low-income residents most often bear “disproportionately bear the burden of pollution,” Becker said.

“There’s a lot going on in the clean air space,” she added.

Protect waterways from pollution

Likewise, there’s a lot going on in the area of ​​clean water, said Jen Pelz, wild rivers program director at the environmental nonprofit WildEarth Guardians. And the priority for many environmentalists is knowing which waterways need to be protected.

Trump’s EPA has removed protections against “fleeting” and intermittent flows, which only flow during storms or at certain times of the year, Pelz said. About 68% of Colorado’s waterways fall into this category.

“If all of this Colorado water isn’t protected and clean, then these pollutants or developments are causing problems further downstream as well,” Pelz said.

Colorado Farm Bureau officials welcomed the move in late 2019. Old regulations, enacted under President Barack Obama, masked land use rights for farmers in the state, the then President of Colorado said at the time. Farm Bureau, Don Shawcroft.

Becker, however, said the Trump administration had gone “far too far” and that the Biden administration is now working to restore many of those lost protections.

But Pelz said it was not enough.

“Don’t just restore the protections that were there before,” Pelz said. “Think about the challenges we face in the future and offer the broadest protections possible. “

As populations continue to grow and climate change dries up many of the country’s rivers and streams, clean water will be all the more important in the years to come, Pelz said.

Looking to the future, Colorado Farm Bureau executive vice president Chad Vorthmann said in a statement he hopes Becker and the rest of the EPA will protect the agriculture industry from “unnecessary regulations” and ensure that farmers have a say in new policies.

“KC Becker is a tough negotiator but knows how to bring stakeholders together to discuss concerns,” Vorthmann said. “She knows important issues like natural resources and water and we look forward to working with her in her new role.”

Native American tribes and funding

As water supplies dwindle in the West, so does the money allocated to the 28 Native American tribes in Region 8, said Rich Janssen Jr., chief of the natural resources department for the Confederate Salish and Kootenai Tribes in northwestern Montana.

“It becomes frustrating to see that, year after year, tribal funding continues to be cut,” Janssen said.

Each tribe sets its own standards for water and air quality, among other protections, and uses EPA money to pay inspectors and enforce those regulations, Janssen said. And during the Trump administration, funding for the Confederate Salish and Kottenai tribes declined by as much as 25%, he said.

Becker said she would push for more money for the tribes and that some of them should already be on track from the bipartisan $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure bill passed by the tribes. Congress in November.

Millions more of the bill will be set aside for the six states in the Becker region, she said. And its responsibility will be to allocate money to local governments looking to replace lead service lines, replace diesel school buses with electric buses, soil remediation programs and more.

All in all, Becker said her appointment represents a “huge opportunity” for her to use her past experience to protect not only the environment but also public health. And the historic spending program, coupled with the Biden administration’s environmental goals “is going to have a truly measurable impact on people’s daily lives.”

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Salt lake city

Public comments are now open on the proposed greater walking and cycling links at Sugar House, Liberty Wells


Photo: Parleystrail.org

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, December 13, 2021 (Gephardt Daily) – Residents of Salt Lake City are urged to review the draft plans for the 2023 reconstruction of Highland Drive / 1100 East and provide online commentary until the 30th. December, officials said on Monday.

“The planned changes will see the major connector rebuilt from I-80 to Logan Avenue with a particular focus on improvements for pedestrians and cyclists and the completion of connections on the trail systems on the east side of the road. city, “said a press release from the Salt Lake City mayor’s office.

The draft plans can be viewed online here and are “based on years of planning documents, including the Sugar House Area Master Plan, Sugar House 2013 Traffic Plan, and the Local Links Study Project – all of which have included ‘robust public engagement,’ the press release said. The planned improvements will allow for a wide multi-use path for pedestrians and cyclists spanning from I-80 to Wilson Avenue, widened sidewalks, multi-use paths, bike paths, improved drainage and more.

“Our goal is to make Sugar House a more comfortable place for people,” said Lynn Jacobs, Salt Lake City Transportation Planner. “We know people come to Sugar House for its local small businesses, great food, beautiful trees and unique energy. This project is designed to improve what makes the neighborhood great by making it more comfortable for getting around without a car – on foot, by bike, by public transit or even by carpooling.

When complete, the project will link the last gap in the Parley’s trail system to Salt Lake City and provide connections between Parley’s and McClelland trails and businesses in the area.

“More than 11,000 vehicles use Highland Drive every day,” the press release said. “Although the lanes are being reconfigured, a review of a decade of traffic counts shows that traffic volumes on Sugar House’s main roads have not kept pace with development. The traffic growth is about 1.5% per year on average, the activity growth is 9% per year.

The reconstruction project is a part of Salt Lake City’s ‘Finance Our Future’ obligation adopted by voters in 2018. Additional phases of public engagement will continue throughout the first half of 2022 with a final plan ready to go. fall 2022 and construction in 2023.

Review and comments are available here and project updates are available by email at [email protected]


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Utah economy

New Chick-fil-A Creates 140 Jobs in St. George, Provides Free Food to 100 ‘Local Heroes’ – St George News

ST. GEORGE – A new Chick-fil-A store will open Tuesday at the southwest corner of Bluff Street and Blackridge Drive, bringing 140 full-time and part-time jobs to the St. George economy.

File photo of team member Ryan Wright and local Chick-fil-A franchise owner Deven Macdonald at the “Remarkable Futures” scholarship ceremony, St. George, Utah February 27, 2019 | Photo by Andrew Pinckney, St. George News

They also provide free food for a year to 100 “local heroes” who impact Washington County, owner and operator Deven Macdonald said.

“We chose public safety personnel from St. George and Washington City,” Macdonald told St. George News. “We also selected the Washington County School District administration and teachers, as well as staff from local health organizations as our ‘Community Heroes’ recipients, for making a significant impact in the community of St. George. “

Macdonald attended BYU before working 14 years in portfolio management at a software company. Then, in 2013, he and his wife moved to St. George to open Chick-fil-A Red Rock Commons.

“For nearly a decade, my family and I have called St. George our home,” he said in a press release shared with St. George News. “I am honored to have the opportunity to continue to make a difference in the community that has meant so much to us. “

A scene from Chick-fil-A at Bluff Street and Blackridge Drive, St. George, Utah on December 3, 2021 | Photo by David Dudley, St. George News

Macdonald said he is currently looking to fill 140 positions at Chick-fil-A Bluff Street and Blackridge Drive. He said he had a penchant for working with young people as he was active in many youth organizations and had a passion to help young people develop essential life skills.

“It’s no secret that our industry faces labor shortages,” said Macdonald, “which is one of the reasons our restaurant encourages all interested candidates to apply. I look forward to mentoring my team members and taking care of our neighbors, serving them tasty food with signature Chick-fil-A hospitality.

Chick-fil-A also offers scholarship opportunities for certain team members, as well as flexible hours, for those who wish to pursue further education beyond high school.

Chick-fil-A Bluff Street and Blackridge Drive are located at 1333 S. Auto Mall Drive, Building 200, near the Veterans Memorial Highway exit. They are open from 6.30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday to Saturday.

Ed. Note: A previous story said the store opened last week. It has been corrected.

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.

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Salt lake city government

Breeze Airways ™ Celebrates First Holiday Season With Lowest Fares and Best Deals Ever for Black Friday and Cyber ​​Monday


SALT LAKE CITY, November 24, 2021– (BUSINESS WIRE) – Breeze Airways, the “Seriously Friendly” â„¢ new low-cost U.S. airline, celebrates its first Black Friday and Cyber ​​Monday with selling prices offering the airline’s lowest fares and best deals since its launch in May 2021.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211124006277/en/

Breeze Airways offers its lowest fares and best deals ever for Black Friday and Cyber ​​Monday. (Photo: Business Wire)

Nicer Fare Sale * – For one day only this Black Friday, November 26, 2021, Breeze will be offering its “Nicer Fare Sale”. For just $ 19 more than a “Nice” fare (the lowest Breeze fare), travelers can grab a Nicer fare that includes one free checked baggage ($ 20 value), one piece of luggage at free hand ($ 20 value), a seat with more legroom ($ 30 value), free drink and snack ($ 10 value), priority boarding and 4% BreezePoints earned (versus 2% with a Nice fare) – a value of up to $ 80 – for travel until May 2, 2022, available on all flights but places are limited.

Nice fare sale ** – For one day only on Cyber ​​Monday, November 29, 2021, Breeze will be offering Nice fares of $ 29 on flights selected from the 16 Breeze destinations, for trips between the 6th and the 31st January 2022.**

“It’s really hard to beat our already low prices for non-stop flights, but we did it,” said David Neeleman, president and CEO of Breeze. “This year, we are grateful for the successful launch of Breeze and we thank our guests, as well as the best possible deals.”

*Nicer fare available for an additional $ 19 above the price of a Nice fare (lowest Breeze fare) on all flights, all dates, no blackout dates. Only available when booking a new reservation, limited offer until Nicer fares on a flight are sold out. No advance purchase requirement applies. The seats are limited. Must be purchased November 26, 2022, 12:01 AM – 11:59 PM ET, for travel through May 2, 2022. Price displayed includes taxes and government fees. Fare rules, routes and times are subject to change without notice. Restrictions may apply.

**The Nice fare of $ 29 is available on some one-way flights. The seats are limited. Must be purchased November 29, 2021, 12:01 AM to 11:59 PM ET, for travel between January 6, 2022 and January 31, 2022. Nicer fare includes taxes and government fees. Fare rules, routes and times are subject to change without notice. Restrictions and blackout dates may apply.

On Breeze airways

Breeze Airways, which began serving 16 cities in 13 states in May 2021, is the best-funded start-up airline in the country’s history. Founded by aviation entrepreneur David Neeleman, the low-cost carrier combines kindness and technology to deliver its “Seriously Nice” â„¢ non-stop service between secondary airports bypassing hubs and saving customers time and money. money. The airline recently announced an order for 80 A220-300 aircraft, the first of which will enter service in mid-2022.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211124006277/en/

Contacts

Gareth Edmondson-Jones
Breeze airways
917 399-9355
[email protected]


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Utah economy

US to release 50 million barrels of oil to cut energy costs

Storage tanks are shown at a refinery in Detroit on April 21, 2020. The White House announced Tuesday it has ordered 50 million barrels of oil from the strategic reserve to reduce energy costs. (Paul Sancya, Associated Press)

Estimated reading time: 4-5 minutes

WASHINGTON – President Joe Biden on Tuesday ordered 50 million barrels of oil from the strategic reserve to help reduce energy costs, in coordination with other major energy consuming countries including China, India and the United Kingdom.

The move targets global energy markets, but also voters facing higher inflation and rising prices ahead of Thanksgiving and the winter holidays. The price of gas is about $ 3.40 per gallon, more than 50% more than a year ago, according to the American Automobile Association.

There was no noticeable impact on the benchmark US crude barrel price following Tuesday’s announcement. Prices have gone up and down all month and are up less than 1% so far in this shortened holiday week.

Biden was quick to reshape much of his economic agenda around the issue of inflation, saying his recently passed $ 1 trillion infrastructure package will reduce pricing pressures by making freight transportation more efficient and less expensive.

Republican lawmakers hammered the administration so that inflation peaked in 31 years in October. The Consumer Price Index climbed 6.2% from a year ago, the biggest 12-month jump since 1990.

Republican Senate Leader Mitch McConnell burst into the White House in a speech last week, claiming the victims of the price hike were middle-class Americans.

“The top three drivers of the staggering 6.2% inflation rate we recorded last month were housing, transportation and food,” the Kentucky senator said. “These are not luxury goods, they are essentials, and they occupy a much larger share of the budgets of families from the middle class to the bottom.”

The Strategic Oil Reserve is an emergency stockpile to preserve access to oil in the event of natural disasters, national security concerns and other events. Maintained by the Department of Energy, the reserves are stored in caves created in salt domes along the Gulf coasts of Texas and Louisiana. There are approximately 605 million barrels of sweet and sour oil on the reserve.


As we emerge from an unprecedented global economic crisis, the supply of oil has not kept up with demand, forcing working families and businesses to pay the price.

–Jennifer Granholm, Energy Secretary


“As we emerge from an unprecedented global economic crisis, the supply of oil has not kept up with the demand, forcing families and businesses to pay the price,” said Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm in a press release. “This action underscores the president’s commitment to use the tools available to reduce costs for working families and continue our economic recovery.”

The Biden administration has argued that the reserve is the right tool to help alleviate the supply problem. Americans used an average of 20.7 million barrels a day in September, according to the Energy Information Administration. This means that the release almost equates to about two and a half days of additional supply.

The pandemic has turned energy markets – like everything else – out of whack on several fronts. When the closures began in April 2020, demand collapsed and oil futures prices turned negative. Energy traders didn’t want to end up with crude they couldn’t store. But as the economy recovered, prices hit a seven-year high in October.

American production has not recovered. Figures from the Energy Information Administration indicate that national production averages around 11 million barrels per day, up from 12.8 million before the start of the pandemic.

Republicans have also taken advantage of Biden’s efforts to minimize drilling and support renewables as the reason for the decline in production, although there are multiple market dynamics at play as fossil fuel prices are higher in the world. world.

“President Biden’s policies increase inflation and energy prices for the American people. Tapping into the strategic oil reserve will not solve the problem,” said Senator John Barrasso, R-Wyoming. “We are experiencing higher prices because the administration and Congressional Democrats are waging a war on American energy.”

The White House decision comes after weeks of diplomatic negotiations and the release will be taken in parallel with other nations. Japan and South Korea are also participating.

The US Department of Energy will make oil available from the Strategic Oil Reserve in two ways; 32 million barrels will be released in the coming months and will return to the reserve in the years to come, the White House said. An additional 18 million barrels will be part of an oil sale that Congress previously authorized.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Monday evening that the White House would also keep an eye on oil companies.

“We will continue to put pressure on the oil companies that have made record profits and watch what we see as lower prices there when there is a supply of oil or the price of oil goes down and the price goes down. gas is not going down, ”Psaki says. “It doesn’t take an expert in economics to know this is a problem.

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Salt lake city

Salt Lake Chamber: RSG Performance


Here’s Derek Miller talking about business. More and more, the best companies are offering wellness programs focused on improving the lives of company employees. Monnica Manuel, President of RSG Performance, explains how her company’s advanced training can have a positive impact on Utah businesses.

MONNICA MANUAL

In April, then again in July and again in August, the number of workers who quit broke all-time records. Even before this Great Resignation, as it’s known, GALLUP RESEARCH showed us that employee disengagement is already costing US businesses $ 450 billion a year. Forbes magazine tells us that this represents 34% of each employee’s annual salary.

For owners and managers, this is a wake-up call and we encourage leaders to reconsider the corporate culture to find new ways to engage employees, to excite them and to engage in their work and their place of work.

Gallup has also shown that employees want career development and personal improvement – not table tennis and free lunches, and that the antidote to employee disengagement is managers who know how to coach.

RSG Performance uses evidence-based practices informed by years of executive leadership to transform you and your leaders into great coaches. You can find out more about our programs at RSGPERFORMANCE.COM.

DEREK MILLER

RSG Performance stands for “Ready, set, go performance”. You can stop by their table during the Women & Business Conference, an event hosted by the Salt Lake Chamber, to be held at the Grand America Hotel on Friday, November 19. I’m Derek Miller from the Salt Lake City Chamber, talking about business.


This press release was produced by the salt lake room. The opinions expressed are those of the author.


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Salt lake city

SLC leaders ‘frustrated’ as town again resorts to temporary shelter for winter homeless people


Cars parked outside the Ramada Inn in Salt Lake City on Wednesday. The site was chosen as an emergency homeless shelter this winter. (KSL-TV)

Estimated reading time: 6-7 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY – Leaders in the Utah capital are not happy that the city has once again been chosen to house an emergency winter shelter.

Salt Lake City Council, in a meeting Tuesday, reluctantly approved the Ramada Inn at 1659 W. North Temple as the site of a temporary 250-bed overflow this winter. Officials from the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness said the temporary facility will be a “safe, 24-hour, no-congregation environment” that will allow homeless people to escape the cold this winter.

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall explained that the county coalition had selected the site and asked Salt Lake City to approve the use of an emergency shelter.

Although they recognized the need for the shelter, what upset the mayor and several members of the city council is that the city was wiretapped by the state for the three years that a shelter d urgency was needed following the decision to close The Road Home.

“I am frustrated by the disproportionate and largely unsupported efforts Salt Lake City is making to the statewide homelessness crisis,” Mendenhall said, moments before the council vote on Tuesday. “My frustration seems equal to that of City Council, where today’s discussion reflected a waning desire to permanently house the vast majority of services in this county without the financial support that should accompany that service.”

This winter’s shelter will be the second in a row to be found on the west side of town, an area Salt Lake City Councilor Ana Valdemoros called “the already stressed part of town.” She said police and firefighters requested more staff and overtime, and apologized for not being able to answer every call.

Valdemoros argued that a recent report that a homeless shelter was not feasible in other Utah towns and unincorporated areas of the county is an example that Salt Lake City has been pushed “into a corner” and ashamed if he didn’t open an emergency shelter.

Salt Lake City Councilor Victoria Petro-Eschler, who was sworn in last week and represents the area in which the shelter will be located, agreed. She added that she was concerned about issues that could arise for residents and small businesses near the emergency shelter.

“Asking the city to shoulder this burden once is an emergency. Having been asked multiple times now, with the west side significantly targeted, is a model,” Petro-Eschler said. “This model should disqualify this type of emergency demand. It is more of a seasonal demand.”

The additional resources needed for the shelter are why Salt Lake City Councilor Darin Mano said he believes the state should help cover the city’s costs.

There were also concerns about the intended property for the shelter raised at the meeting. Nigel Swaby, chairman of the Fairpark Community Council, said he visited the site earlier today and was “in poor condition”. He said he saw fixtures and floor coverings stripped from some rooms; some had a toilet above the beds.

“It will cost a lot more money and take longer to bring this building up to code than the time needed to provide housing in this year’s overflow,” he said.

Alejandro Puy, who was confirmed as the winner of the Salt Lake City Council District 2 race earlier Tuesday, said he had also visited the “place of great concern”.

“This motel is run down and I’m very worried,” Puy said. “I don’t know who’s going to pay to fix and code the place, but it’s very, very concerning – the state of it.”


At the end of the day, I don’t think we, as a group of elected officials, can have people potentially to freeze to death on the streets of our city.

–Chris Wharton, Salt Lake City Councilor


While city leaders and residents were not happy with the position they have been placed in, they also know time is running out. Temperatures in Salt Lake City fell below freezing overnight; the National Weather Service noted these are the coldest temperatures recorded in the city since the end of March. It’s a reminder that winter is fast approaching.

At the same time, the existing permanent shelters in Salt Lake County are already filling up. Andrew Johnston, the city’s director of homeless policy and outreach, told council in a working session earlier Tuesday that use of homeless shelters is “quite high,” at 97% in all areas.

Mendenhall recently posted a six-month hiatus on creating any new permanent shelter in the city, again explaining on Tuesday that the city “hosts far more than its fair share of homeless services” in the state. However, she added that she “intentionally” allowed an avenue to open for temporary overflow facilities because she believed residents would rather have temporary shelter in their city than see the homeless. having “nowhere to go, freezing in our streets”.

It was this sentiment that persuaded five of the seven city councilors to vote in favor of the shelter. Salt Lake City Councilor Chris Wharton said the vote was “difficult”. On the one hand, the city will be burdened with an additional burden which could exacerbate the problems in its west side; on the other hand, it can lead to a “life and death” situation for many homeless people if the state does not have an emergency winter shelter.

“At the end of the day, I don’t think we, as a group of elected officials, can have people potentially frozen to death on the streets of our city,” Wharton said. “It’s a national epidemic, but… Salt Lake City is escalating and doing so every year because our residents appreciate and understand that this is a crisis that we must at least do our part and try to protect. . “

The Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness said the new space will have “24/7 onsite security, shuttles to transport customers, meals and connections to other services.” It says there will be 300 overflow beds available until April 2022.

This figure includes motel coupons in other cities and rugs from the St. Vincent de Paul Dining Room and Weigand Homeless Resource Center.

“We know that there are many players involved in the development of these solutions and we are committed to being good partners to ensure we are providing consistent care to homeless people in collaboration with the surrounding community,” wrote the coalition in a press release. “We know the surrounding neighborhoods have faced a lot of pressures over the years and we look forward to working with the community as we serve our most vulnerable residents this winter. “

Meanwhile, Mendenhall says more needs to be done in the future so that Salt Lake City does not have to cover the costs of emergency shelter on its own. She said beds at homeless shelters should be distributed among other towns in the county and that Salt Lake City should secure “adequate” public funding for the public safety costs associated with running the shelter, which would otherwise fall on the city’s taxpayers.

Although frustrated with the process, the mayor said she still applauds the city council vote given the circumstances.

“This action will save lives,” she said. “But I know we all agree that the residents and businesses of Salt Lake City deserve a more balanced path forward.”

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Utah economy

Utah’s 2021 exercise ends with a bang

SALT LAKE CITY (November 16, 2021) – Utah’s 2021 fiscal year ends stronger than expected. Heads of state will have an additional $ 614 million to appropriate during the 2022 general session. These funds are likely an anomaly due to federal stimulus funds and economic volatility.

Governor Spencer J. Cox, President J. Stuart Adams and President Brad Wilson make the following statement regarding this surplus:

“Utah’s economy is booming and education funding is at an all-time high due to our state’s sound economic policies, including our efforts to quickly and safely reopen businesses during the pandemic. While this is an unusual year as the state has received unprecedented stimulus funding from the federal government, we remain committed to fiscal responsibility and funding forward-thinking and innovative projects. The investments we make now will benefit the Utahns for generations to come. “

Funds will be spent with a careful emphasis on fiscal responsibility, including the use of one-time money for one-time costs such as infrastructure investments and capital improvements.

Download this press release here.

###

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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City abandons century-old Utah Pantages theater; building to be demolished


The Utah Theater is pictured in Salt Lake City on December 3, 2019. Salt Lake City, which purchased the building in 2010, has finalized its deal to turn it over to a development agency that is considering demolishing the building. (Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News)

Estimated reading time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY – The set is now set for the demolition of the century-old Utah Pantages Theater to make way for the newest skyscraper in downtown Salt Lake City, despite attempts by outside groups to call for the building’s preservation.

The Salt Lake City redevelopment agency on Wednesday closed the transfer of the Main Street building to Texas-based global development company Hines. The transaction is seen as the city’s final step in the property transfer process; City officials said on Friday that Hines can now move forward with site preparation for construction of the new “150 Main” building.

Salt Lake City and its GDR had owned the property for a decade. In December 2019, they struck a deal with Hines, ceding ownership to the developer at no additional cost. By that time, it had already been revealed that the company wanted to build a 30-story building with 300 apartments in its place.

Details of the building continue to be worked out, but city officials said on Friday that the current plan still calls for a $ 100 million mixed-use building with 10% of the tower apartments designated as affordable housing for residents making up about 60% to 80% of the county’s median income.

“The closing of the sale represents an important step in the redevelopment of this property and now allows us to focus our attention on the benefits this project will provide. In particular, the inclusion of open spaces and affordable units that will provide the opportunity for the public and new residents to live, work and play in the city center, ”said Danny Walz, director of the city’s GDR , in a press release.

Wednesday’s transaction marks a possible final step in what has been a controversial few years in determining the fate of the building, although city officials have not indicated a timeframe for when the theater could be demolished.

The original construction of the theater began in 1918 and it opened in 1920. It was, among other things, one of the first buildings in the country to be fitted with an air conditioning system. It was then split into two theaters in the 1960s during renovations at the time.

City officials said the building had been vacant since 1992; they argued that he needed “substantial” rehabilitation since that time. The city’s redevelopment agency acquired the property in 2010. By the agency, the purpose of the purchase was to “activate Main Street” with the property, either by demolishing or renovating it. The agency has since estimated that it would cost between $ 40 million and $ 80 million to renovate the building as is, so it was sold.

“As the nation’s fastest growing state capital, Salt Lake City is in the midst of incredible growth and change. We need more housing, more access to affordable housing and more green space in our urban areas, ”Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall said in a statement Friday. “While it is unfortunate that under previous ownership the theater has seen decades of intentional and unintentional degradation, it is encouraging that the upcoming development of the 150 Main will bring with it so many of our city’s current needs to the heart of our downtown. “

Groups like Preservation Utah and Save the Utah Pantages Theater opposed the 2019 sale and fought for the building to be preserved.

The first states that he had been involved in the attempt to preserve the theater for about two decades; the latter of the two attempted to get a question about the sale added to the city’s ballot this year, then sued the city after the initiative was denied. A 3rd District Court judge dismissed the lawsuit on September 23 – although the decision has since been appealed, court records show.

The Save the Utah Pantages Theater group also questioned the city’s rehabilitation estimate as a similar theater in Tacoma, Washington, was rehabilitated for less than $ 20 million. Its organizers named the theater to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places in September. If the building is classified, this does not prevent the demolition of the building but would allow its owners to benefit from tax credits covering part of the cost of its rehabilitation.

After Wednesday’s transfer, the group’s organizers said in several social media posts that they were not done fighting to save the building.

“I’m not going anywhere. (Casey McDonough) is not going anywhere. (David Berg) is not going anywhere”, group organizer Michael Valentine wrote in a social media post on Friday. “Our international Pantages family is here for the long haul.… It took 12 years to save and restore the Ogden Egyptian in the 1980s. I’ve been here for two years, so if it takes me another decade, let it be. so be it.

“The only way this is all over is when the Pantages is safe, protected, restored and firmly in the hands of the people,” the message continued. “Until then you will not see any rest from me.

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Salt lake city

UTA On Demand is coming to Salt Lake City


Map: UTA

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, October 28, 2021 (Gephardt Daily) – The Utah Transit Authority announced Thursday that the UTA On Demand microtransit service is arriving in Salt Lake City.

The service will launch on December 13 in the western neighborhoods of Salt Lake City, serving Rose Park, Poplar Grove, Fairpark and Glendale.

“This innovative form of on-demand transportation uses app-based technology to plan trips and match multiple passengers heading in a similar direction in a single vehicle, with a route that allows for quick and efficient shared trips,” said said a press release from UTA.

“Originally launched in southern Salt Lake County two years ago, UTA On Demand is growing in popularity by offering a variety of trips to local destinations within the community, connecting with d ‘other bus and train services and providing first and last mile transport solutions. “

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall said, “This exciting new service is a welcome addition to public transportation for our city’s Westside community. This pilot program combines the convenience of on-demand service with the affordability of public transit in a way that will greatly benefit our residents. I am so happy that there will be additional transportation that the residents of Westside can rely on for travel, shopping, entertainment and more.

Service to Salt Lake City will be available seven days a week, 4:00 a.m. to 12:15 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Sunday. Runners can book travel by downloading the UTA On Demand app, available on the App Store or Google Play. Travel must begin and end in the designated service area. After booking a trip, the app displays the pick-up location. UTA On Demand is a corner-to-corner service, so passengers are picked up and dropped off near their point of departure and arrival. Cyclists who do not have a cell phone can plan trips by calling 385-217-8191.

UTA On Demand is also accessible to people with disabilities. Passengers using a mobility aid can request a ride from an accessible van by selecting wheelchair accessibility in their profile. Once activated, all trips will be reserved for an accessible vehicle.

“We are delighted to partner with Salt Lake City to launch another UTA On Demand service,” said Carlton Christensen, Chairman of the Board of UTA. “This service will truly benefit residents of the western part of Salt Lake City with increased mobility, connections to our other transit services, and access to their local community. We appreciate Salt Lake City’s support and vision for innovative transit solutions.

Passengers can pay for their journeys in the UTA On Demand application using a credit or debit card, a FAREPAY card or pass such as Eco Pass or Ed Pass linked to your account. These cards can be added in the app. They can also pay with a valid UTA paper or mobile ticket. Cash is not accepted for UTA On Demand travel.

For more information on UTA On Demand and the new service in Salt Lake City, click here.


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Salt lake city

Salt Lake Chamber: Let’s Talk Business: The Olson Company


Here’s Derek Miller talking about business. In 1956, Les Olson, a father of twelve young children, gave up a stable job to start his own business. His grandson, Troy Olson, joins us with an update on this business.

TROY OLSON

Since 1956, The Olson Company has provided organizations in Utah and Nevada with the technology needed to increase productivity and gain competitive advantage. Over the past 60 years, our family-owned business has grown into one of Utah’s largest resellers of office technology, known today for superior service.

Many know us as a copier company, but now we are also a leader in IT services. Over the past decade, we’ve helped clients of all sizes with our outsourced IT. For some, we manage everything, while for others, we simply support their internal team. We also help those with one-off projects – so if your business needs IT expertise, let us know.

As technology evolves, our team of trained and friendly professionals are committed to evolving with it while helping our customers to be productive and secure.

Visit lesolson.com to learn more about our IT services. It’s Olson with an “O”.

DEREK MILLER

The Les Olson company now has nearly 300 employees at nine locations in Utah and Nevada. The third generation now owns and runs the business and the business has many fourth generation family members. I’m Derek Miller from the Salt Lake House speaking on business.


This press release was produced by the salt lake room. The opinions expressed are those of the author.


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Utah economy

Blue Raven Solar recognized by Mountain West Capital Network’s Utah100 annual list of the state’s fastest growing companies

Mountain West Capital Network Recognized Blue Raven Solar as One of Utah State’s Top 100 Fastest Growing Companies

Blue Raven Solar has never been in a better position with as much momentum as we have now. We are proud to be part of an industry that is changing so rapidly and changing the world! “

– Ben Peterson, CEO

OREM, UTAH, USA, October 19, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – For a fourth consecutive year, Blue Raven Solar has been recognized as one of Utah’s fastest growing companies by Mountain West Capital Network (MWCN). Blue Raven Solar was also recognized in 2020 on the same list and was included on the Emerging Elite list in 2018 and 2019.

Each year, MWCN’s exclusive rewards program rewards investors, entrepreneurs and professional service providers for the impacts they make on the economy and surrounding business success in the state of Utah. These awards also recognize startups and companies with the highest revenue growth.

“Blue Raven Solar has never been in a better position with as much momentum as we have now. We are proud to be part of an industry that is changing so rapidly and changing the world! Says Ben Peterson, CEO of Blue Raven Solar.

Blue Raven Solar is giving homeowners across America a simple, affordable way to get the best solar technology while saving money on their utilities. In seven years, the company has grown from three to over 1,400 team members nationwide and has become a leading solar company in the United States. Blue Raven Solar has been recognized multiple times on the Inc. 5000 list, the Utah Business Fast 50 list, and the Utah State Best of, among other awards.

The Utah 100 winners were chosen based on their percentage and the increase in their dollar earnings between 2015 and 2020. MWCN’s awards event, recognizing the state’s top companies, has rewarded the winners at an event organized on 12 October.

“Utah’s economy has never been stronger, and it is in large part thanks to the tremendous efforts of these companies and others that make Utah the perfect place for business,” said said Ryan Dent, MWCN Utah 100 committee chair. “We’ve had 26 great years honoring the companies that have made Utah great, and we look forward to the next 26 years and beyond.”

To learn more about Blue Raven Solar’s ranking on the Utah 100, visit www.mwcn.org.

About Blue Raven Solar

Blue Raven Solar, a SunPower company, was founded in 2014 and has grown into a top-selling national solar brand. The company’s mission is “to improve the lives of homeowners by reducing their energy bills, relying more on clean and abundant renewables, and delivering a world-class customer experience through a sales process. reliable and fast, high-quality installation. Blue Raven Solar believes that all homeowners should have the same opportunity to invest in simple, reliable, affordable and high-quality solar power. Visit Blue Raven Solar at www.blueravensolar.com and follow us on Instagram and Facebook.

Join the movement | Solar Raven Blue | The future of energy. Today.

Solar Raven Blue
Solar marketing of the blue crow
+1 800-377-4480
write us here

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Salt lake city government

AG Reyes: Biden administration’s IRS proposal is illegal / cumbersome


SALT LAKE CITY – Today, in a letter to President Joe Biden and Secretary of the Treasury Janet Yellen, Utah Attorney General, Utah Attorney General Sean D. Reyes and 19 other attorneys general states, have expressed opposition to the administration advocating a policy that would provide the federal government with access to nearly all U.S. bank accounts and financial transaction information.

In the letter, the attorneys general argue that banks across the country will need to transform the way they do business to comply with proposed reporting requirements, including investing significant sums in data collection and other systems. The letter argues that consumers will be punished in several ways, as banks would likely pass on costs in the form of fees or higher interest rates, not to mention centralized storage of sensitive information would provide cybercriminals with an additional target to exploit. with information on almost all Americans.

The group says that if arresting financial criminals or punishing tax evaders is the administration’s goal, they will gladly join together to find the right solutions based on the rule of law, but violate the rights of virtually all Americans with a bank account is not the answer.

In addition to Utah, the coalition also includes the attorneys general of the following states: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oklahoma , South Carolina, Texas and West Virginia.

A copy of the letter is attached.

Related


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Utah economy

Biden’s approval rating drops to new low, poll finds

In this September 24, 2021 photo, President Joe Biden listens during the Quad Summit in the East Room of the White House. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

(NEXSTAR) – Americans’ approval of President Joe Biden’s professional performance has fallen to a new low in a Quinnipiac poll released Wednesday.

Only 38% of Americans polled approved of Biden, up from 42% three weeks ago. Fifty-three percent of those polled gave it a negative opinion.

When broken down topic by topic, Biden doesn’t fare much better. Only 25% approved of his handling of immigration, 39% approved of his management of the economy and 37% approved of his work as commander-in-chief.

His best score reported by Quinnipiac was on handling the coronavirus pandemic: 48% approval versus 50% disapproval.

“Beaten on confidence, questioned on leadership and challenged on overall competence, President Biden is hammered from all sides as his approval rating continues to drop to a number not seen since the scrutiny of it. ‘Trump administration,’ Quinnipiac poll analyst Tim Malloy said in a press release.

The way people view the president’s performance is clearly divided along party lines: 94% of Republicans polled said they disapproved, while 80% of Democrats said they approved.

President Biden’s ratings have plummeted in recent months as the Delta variant ravaged the country, prompting some places to reinstate mask warrants and overcrowded hospitals to cancel elective surgeries. At the same time, Biden oversaw a messy and deadly withdrawal from Afghanistan. To make matters worse, its legislative priorities, like a massive infrastructure package, have stalled in Congress.

“Everyone is frustrated, it’s part of being in government, of being frustrated,” Biden told reporters on Saturday. He pledged to “work like hell” to get the pillars of his national program adopted.

See the full breakdown of survey results on the Quinnipiac University website.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Salt lake city

UTA says plans will cause service delays at Salt Lake City, U. of U.


Passengers arrive by TRAX train at Salt Lake City International Airport on May 13, 2013. The airport’s new station is nearing completion, according to UTA. (Ravell call, Deseret News)

Estimated reading time: 2-3 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah Transit Authority advises passengers at Salt Lake City International Airport and the University of Utah to expect light rail delays this month due to nearby projects of both sites.

UTA on Monday began a bus bridge on its green TRAX line to and from Salt Lake City International Airport. The crews are currently working on the construction of a new station which will eventually lead passengers to the new main terminal of the airport.

While passengers were able to exit at a temporary stop near the airport and take a short bus ride to it, passengers are now advised to exit at 1940 West Station and then proceed. a longer bus ride to the airport. Buses will also take passengers from the airport to the 1940 West Station.

Transit officials say passengers should expect delays of 15 to 30 minutes due to the bus bridge, which will run until October 21. Buses will run every 15 minutes between 5:32 a.m. and 11:06 p.m. on weekdays, every 30 minutes between 6:25 a.m. and 11:25 p.m. on Saturdays, and every 30 minutes between 6:25 a.m. and 8:05 p.m. on Sundays for the duration of the project.

Meanwhile, UTA officials said red line runners trying to reach the University of Utah should also expect delays of 15 to 30 minutes from Saturday as the crews replace the tracks near Mario Capecchi Drive. From Saturday to Wednesday, passengers heading to the University of Utah will need to exit at UTA Station 900 East, where a bus will take them to Stadium, South Campus and University Medical Center stations.

UTA officials added that the bus will not travel to Fort Douglas station during the bus bridge service, so those who would normally use this station are encouraged to use the South Campus station instead. . Regular service is scheduled to resume on October 14.

According to the University of Utah’s semester schedule, fall vacation is expected to begin next week, so the delay in service will not impact travel to classes.

The project also involves road closures. Westbound traffic from Mario Capecchi Drive at 1850 East and the bends from Mario Capecchi Drive northbound and southbound at South Campus Drive westbound were closed on Monday due to the project. Two lanes are still open from South Wasatch Drive to Gibbon Street on Mario Capecchi Drive southbound. All closures will remain in place until next Wednesday.

All lanes will be open on South Campus Drive eastbound for the duration of the project. The project could cause delays of up to 30 to 60 minutes for motorists.

The project is similar to the rail replacement that happened near Rice-Eccles Stadium in August. UTA officials said the project would add noise to residents and businesses in the area.

“Residents and local businesses should expect noise all day and night as well as dust, vibration and nighttime lighting during work activities,” they wrote in a press release. . “Barriers will be used to reduce noise.”

More stories that might interest you


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Salt lake city

Real Salt Lake remember Utah DB Aaron Lowe ahead of LA Galaxy game


SALT LAKE CITY, Utah –Real Salt Lake remembered Utah Utes defensive back Aaron Lowe from before the club’s game against LA Galaxy.

RSL hosted Los Angeles at Rio Tinto Stadium on Wednesday, September 29.

Lowe was killed in a shooting in Salt Lake City on Sunday, September 26.

Before kicking off against the Galaxy, Real Salt Lake remembered Lowe and posted a photo of the late defensive back on social media.

“# 22Forever,” RSL tweeted alongside a red heart emoji.

Real Salt Lake’s game against LA kicked off at the same time the University of Utah held a candlelight vigil for Lowe.

The Real Salt Lake game against the Galaxy is streamed on the KSL Sports app and on KSLSports.com.

About Aaron Lowe

Aaron Lowe was the first recipient of the Ty Jordan Memorial Scholarship and changed his number from 2 to 22 during the offseason to honor the life of his childhood friend.

Before the BYU game, the Cougars walked out of their tunnel with an “LLTJ” flag. As Utah came out of its tunnel, former Ute Samson Nacua handed the flag to quarterback and captain Cam Rising, who handed the flag to Aaron Lowe.

Lowe signed with Utah in 2019 as a three-star rookie from West Mesquite High School. He played in 11 games on special teams in his freshman year. During COVID-19’s shortened season, Lowe played in all five special team games in 2020.

SLCPD chief Mike Brown has confirmed that Aaron Lowe was shot and killed in a Sugarhouse neighborhood.

According to a press release sent by the SLCPD, they received a call around 10:30 p.m. MDT on Saturday, September 25 for a noise complaint about a house party at 2200 block of South Broadmoor Street. At approximately 12:30 a.m. MDT on Sunday, September 26, SLC911 received a call from a local person reporting a fight involving a weapon. Police were dispatched immediately after the changed circumstances changed the appeal from a noise complaint to an ongoing emergency.

The statement also said he was under investigation for homicide.

Police tweeted an update at 8:30 a.m. MDT stating that the on-site investigation is complete and all street closures have been lifted. They ask anyone with information about the case to call 801-799-3000 and reference case number 21-176828.

Trevor Allen is a Utah Utes insider for KSLSports.com, co-host of the Faith, Family and Football podcast with Clark Phillips III and host of the Crimson Corner podcast. Follow him on Twitter: @TrevorASports.



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Salt lake city government

A march for climate change + a souvenir for homicide victims


Have a nice day, neighbors! Sean Peek here with a brand new edition of the Salt Lake City Daily.


Are you a local business owner or a merchant in Salt Lake City? Our premium local sponsorships keep you on top of inboxes in town every morning. Contact us here for the truth.


First of all, the weather forecast for the day:

Clear all day. High: 84 Low: 62.


Here are the best stories today in Salt Lake City:

  1. Utah children, adolescents and young adults marched Utah Capitol Friday as part of a global climate strike calling for action on climate change. The local march was led by Fridays for the Future of Utah, which is part of a global movement initiated in 2018 by Greta Thunberg. A press release from Utah The organization said the protesters called on government leaders to “intervene now to stop behavior that harms the systems that support human life.” (Salt Lake Tribune)
  2. saturday was National Day of Remembrance for Homicide Victims. Groups of loved ones and advocates gathered at the Utah Capitol measures Saturday to honor those who lost their lives in a homicide. More than 100 people were murdered in Utah last year, which is a record in the state. (KSL.com)
  3. University of Utah football player Aaron Lowe died Sunday after being shot at a house party. (KSL.com)
  4. Salt Lake City Police say a 50-year-old woman is in critical condition after being struck in an auto-pedestrian accident on Saturday morning. (ABC 4)
  5. Salt Lake City Fire Department answered the call for a fire that broke out around 6 a.m. on Saturday morning in an old vacant steakhouse slated for demolition. (fox13now.com)

Today in Salt Lake City:

  • Community Reinvestment Agency Meeting – Town of Mill Creek (7:00 p.m.)

Did you know you can feature your local business here in the newsletter for only $ 79 / month? Click here to begin.


You are officially in the know for today. See you tomorrow morning for another update! If you enjoy these newsletters, consider inviting some of your friends and neighbors to read them. You can send them this link to subscribe.

Sean peek

About me: Sean Peek is a writer and entrepreneur who graduated in English Literature from Weber State University. Over the years, he has worked as a copywriter, editor, SEO specialist and marketing manager for various digital media companies. He is currently the co-owner and operator of the content creation agency Lightning Media Partners.


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Salt lake city government

COVID-19 vaccines for children: what parents need to know


Children as young as 5 years old could be vaccinated against COVID-19 by Halloween, now that Pfizer and BioTech report that lower doses of their vaccine have been shown to be safe while producing a “robust” antibody response in this group of people. ‘age.

The results announced by the companies earlier this week are yet to be submitted to the United States Food and Drug Administration, which will decide whether to change the emergency use order allowing teens ages 12 to 15 years to receive the vaccine to include children aged 5 to 11. .

While the data shared so far appears to be good news for parents concerned about protecting their young children from the deadly virus, experts are waiting to see details of the latest clinical trial that involved some 2,300 children aged 5 to 11. years.

“A press release is just a press release, and we want to see the rest of the data. But I hope that happens very soon, and I hope that a good close review of the data set will be just as encouraging as what they published in the press release, ”said Dr Andy Pavia to journalists in a recent virtual news. conference.

Pavia, chief of the division of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Utah Health and director of hospital epidemiology at Intermountain Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City, said “this is really the point at which we can. say, “Yeah, that sounds awesome.” We are delighted to give it to our children.

How serious is COVID-19 for children?

Lately, there are typically eight to 10 children hospitalized in elementary school for children with COVID-19, Pavia said, “far more than we’ve seen at any time in the past year. I think this reflects both the spread among children that we are seeing this year and the increased infectivity of delta, ”the highly contagious viral variant.

School-aged children also account for about 1 in 4 new cases of the virus in Utah during the current outbreak, he said, a number likely higher because many parents do not test their children for the virus because that they are worried. having to prevent them from going to school.

There have been nearly 60,000 cases of the virus in Utahns aged 14 and under, representing 12% of all cases in the state, according to the Utah Department of Health. Nearly 500 have been sick enough to be hospitalized and two young people in Salt Lake County have died of the disease, including an unvaccinated teenager.

What parents should do

Deciding whether to vaccinate children against COVID-19 means assessing the risks involved, Pavie said. Children get sick enough to be hospitalized or die, but even in the mildest cases they miss school and face the possibility of dealing with what is known as the long COVID-19 – fatigue, fog and other persistent symptoms.

“You have to balance these risks, which people don’t always fully appreciate,” he said, with the potential risks of injections which, so far, “have been shown to be as safe as any vaccine like us. let’s use “. But Pavia said that in children aged 5 to 11, the study was not large enough to know what he called rarer side effects.

This information will come as the vaccine rolls out to the younger group, he said, adding that if his own children were 5 to 11, they would be on the front line for vaccines on day one. where they were available – if they had not already been enrolled in a clinical trial.

“What I would say is if your child goes to school in Utah, he’s at a pretty high risk of contracting COVID and a pretty high risk of complications,” Pavia warned. However, he said, “if they stay home, if they are in a state where there is universal masking and very low infection rates, their risk is lower.”

For low-risk children, the doctor said parents “might want to wait a little longer until we know more about rare or minor safety effects.” The best source of information for parents, Pavia said, is a family pediatrician or other health care provider.

The bottom line for him, however, is that the risk presented by COVID-19 is great while the risk of the vaccine “is almost certainly much, much smaller.”

Will the vaccine really be available by Halloween?

Dr Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and chief medical adviser to President Joe Biden, said there was a good chance the injections would be approved for children before they were go to therapy.

FDA officials pledged earlier this month to “carefully, thoroughly, and independently review the data to assess the benefits and risks and be ready to complete its review as quickly as possible, possibly within a few minutes. weeks rather than a few months ”.

But in the same statement, Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting commissioner of the FDA, and Dr. Peter Marks, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Assessment and Research, also said, “Like every vaccine decision that we took during this pandemic, our assessment of data on COVID-19 vaccine use in children will not cut corners. “

Pavie said that in the past, similar decisions were made within weeks of submitting the application, so late October or early November could be the date when clearance could be anticipated. But he also admitted that it was only a matter of “looking at a crystal ball”.

After FDA approval, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is to meet to develop clinical recommendations. It usually only takes a day or two.

And once the federal government gives the green light, Pavia said he expects injections to be given to children in the same places as teens, teens and adults, including doctors’ offices. , clinics and pharmacies.

Parents planning ahead for the holidays should realize that it takes five weeks from the first dose to be fully immunized. In addition to the three week wait between the two injections, it takes another two weeks after receiving the final dose before a person is considered fully immune to the virus.

How the vaccine was tested

The trial tested two doses of the vaccine given 21 days apart, the same regimen currently given to people 12 years of age and older, but the doses were one-third less than the standard 30 micrograms. However, the immune response generated seemed to be equivalent to larger doses in adolescents.

That’s all the companies had to show since vaccines had been shown to be effective in stopping COVID-19 infections in studies in older groups, including one trial in 44,000 adults, USA Today reported. Trials are currently underway for children 2 to 5 years old and 6 months to 2 years old.

Pfizer and BioTech said the children involved in the studies of the three age groups came from more than 90 locations in the United States, Finland, Poland and Spain, and some had already had COVID-19, according to USA Today .

The other two coronavirus vaccines approved for use in the United States, the two-dose Moderna and the single-dose Johnson & Johnson, are also under study in children. Pfizer’s injections are the only COVID-19 vaccine approved for adolescents and adolescents,

What about “off-label” clichés for children under 12 now?

This question arose last month, when the Pfizer vaccine was fully approved by the FDA, paving the way for prescribing “off-label” injections for different age groups, conditions or other indications than those stated by the manufacturers. authorities.

But experts say it’s not a good idea and have advised to wait until federal authorities have approved the safety concerns and looked into issues such as the proper dosage for young children. Pfizer shots are available under emergency use authorization for ages 12 to 16.

Utah Department of Health on COVID-19 Vaccines for Children

“There is a common misconception that children do not contract COVID-19 or are not at risk of serious illness from the virus. However, some children get sick enough to require hospital treatment. We still don’t know much about how COVID-19 will continue to impact children in the long term, ”the department said in a statement.

“COVID-19 is far more dangerous than any potential risk involved in getting a vaccine. Children suffer from serious and potentially long-lasting side effects at rates similar to those of adults, even if they have never had symptoms or had only mild symptoms at the time of their infection. Many children continue to suffer from fatigue, headaches, abdominal, muscle and joint pain, and difficulty remembering and processing information, ”the statement continued.

“The Utah Department of Health is eagerly awaiting further recommendations from the FDA and CDC to vaccinate children under 12 years of age. If you have young children, talk to your healthcare professional about the best ways to protect them until a vaccine is available.


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Salt lake city

Salt Lake Chamber: Jennifer Seltzer Stitt: Good change nourishes souls and transforms communities


Adaptability is a pandemic buzzword in many offices. We are told that the most important – if not the most important – leadership skill is adaptability. Good news folks. By this standard, we are all leaders. I don’t know a soul that hasn’t twisted and twisted over the past two years to take on an avalanche of new and increasingly bizarre challenges. And it’s not just you and me trying to navigate quicksand. The people we love, the places we work and the communities we live in are also adapting to rapidly changing realities.

All this relentless uncertainty and constant learning can tire even the strongest person. Regardless of our openness to new ideas or our courage, it is difficult not to tremble, even if only a little, at the end of a long day where we wonder what the world will ask of us. tomorrow.

I was talking with a friend about the tension between the very real need to adjust and the fatigue and anxiety that comes with constant change. She said, “I always thought I was adaptable. I like the change. But over the past year or so, I’ve realized that I only like the right change.

Good change. The phrase reminded me of Congressman John Lewis’s famous call to get in “good trouble.” In a 2020 speech commemorating Bloody Sunday, Congressman Lewis told us to –

“Have hope, be optimistic. Our fight is not the fight of a day, of a week, of a month or of a year, it is the fight of a lifetime. Never have, never afraid to make noise and get in trouble, necessary trouble. ”

The ability to adapt to changes imposed on us is important. If all we do is survive – bend with the winds of change without breaking – we can and should be proud. There are days when I consider it a victory to have survived intact.

But there are also times when we have the capacity to do more than endure. In these moments, we take a step back from the details that so often dictate day-to-day survival and look at the big picture. We move from reaction to innovation and creation. It is from this perspective that we can use crisis and uncertainty to actively unlearn the “old way” and make the right changes that are needed.

Good change nourishes our souls and transforms our organizations and communities for the better. I believe it means something as simple as making new connections in our daily lives that help our families and communities thrive and help manage or support large institutional and systemic changes. It is asking questions about what can be: what new technology do we need to adopt? What new languages ​​do we need to learn? What new approaches do we need to take to be the people and organizations we want to become?

Is it any wonder that we like the idea of ​​a good change? It is hopeful, inspiring and innovative. But it’s also a very difficult job to do in the midst of a pandemic and all the uncertainty that comes with it. There are few – if any – people who can maintain the kind of daring, vulnerability, optimism and energy it takes to effect good and necessary change day in and day out. Instead, it seems like we’re moving between the role of adaptation and creation, survival and rise. With that in mind, and whatever role you see yourself in today, have hope and be optimistic. You are the leader we need.

About our guest writer:
Jennifer Seltzer Stitt
Director of Community Relations, Salt Lake Community College

Jennifer Seltzer Stitt is Director of Community Relations at Salt Lake Community College. She works to strengthen the role of the College within our community and facilitates support for a variety of college initiatives. Throughout her career, she has worked with nonprofits, government, and the community to create systems change and give people the platform and tools they need to be successful. Jennifer received her BA from the University of Miami and her MA from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. When she’s not working, you’ll find Jennifer at local festivals, farmer’s markets, and baseball games with her husband and two energetic boys.


This press release was produced by the salt lake room. The opinions expressed are those of the author.


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Utah economy

AG investigators destroy major retail theft case

WEST VALLEY CITY – The Utah Attorney General’s Office (Crimes Against Statewide Economy) CASE unit has arrested a West Valley City man who was profiting from the resale of large quantities of stolen goods to local big box retailers. Officers recovered more than $ 80,000 in brand new power tools, household items and sports equipment intended for illegal sale.

Photos of the seized goods: Here

And here.

And here.

Oscar Martinez, 45, has been charged with Possession of Stolen Property; 3 counts of illegal acquisition of stolen property and money laundering.

Organized theft in retail is one of the most serious challenges facing retailers this year. Across the country, people load shopping carts with expensive goods and simply steal them. It is estimated that millions of dollars in goods are lost every month across the country. The proceeds are typically sold in online marketplaces, with the money typically used to fund drug addiction.

Martinez would have arranged for drug addicts to steal the goods for him. Agents say he would provide shopping lists for the items at retailers, including Home Depot, then pay a fraction of the value, then resell them online for a profit. They say this illegal operation has been going on for over a year.

“Organized retail crime is a very serious problem in Utah, and it is also a national trend,” said CASE Commander Christopher Walden. “It has become an epidemic and is driving up the costs of these items so that stores can cover their losses. We are committed to continuing to fight these crimes statewide.

CASE is a joint task force between the Utah Attorney General’s Office and the Utah Department of Public Safety, State Office of Investigations. ——

ICAC arrest in Salt Lake County

SALT LAKE COUNTY – Also this week: ICAC officers continued to investigate dozens of tips received regarding citizens distributing child pornography. ICAC officers arrested a man on Wednesday after discovering tens of thousands of cases of child sexual abuse at a residence. Officers also recovered drugs and a gun from the home.

Officers charged Garret Brian Ferrari, 60, with 10 counts of sexual exploitation of a minor. Firearms and drug offenses will be charged separately. On the spot, Ferrari admitted that it has been collecting these files for years, which corroborates the volume of files recovered. ###

Related

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Salt lake city government

Salt Lake Room: Let’s Talk Business: Totem Tech


Here’s Derek Miller talking about business. Utah is famous for a lot of things, including our fast growing tech companies. Among those at the cutting edge of technology is Totem Technologies, which started in Weber County in 2005. CEO Alli Bey is here to tell us more about what they do.

ALLI BEY

Compliant cybersecurity can seem prohibitive for most small businesses. It’s our mission at Totem Technologies to ensure that small businesses get and stay compliant with ever-changing cybersecurity regulations.

Our world has changed dramatically over the past two decades, especially when it comes to data protection. As we all know, “cybersecurity” is now a buzzword around all aspects of business – costing the global economy more than $ 1 trillion last year alone. This is because our adversaries have turned the theft of intellectual property and other personal digital information into a salable commodity.

Whether you are a government contractor, healthcare provider, or anyone entrusted with private information, you are responsible for protecting that data. Failure to properly protect this information can result in civil or even criminal negligence, but it is especially bad for your reputation. We’re here to help educate and train your business so we can all have a more secure digital environment.

DEREK MILLER

Cyber ​​security attacks are on the increase around the world and Utah is not immune. Last year, businesses in our state lost millions of dollars to cybercriminals. To protect your business and learn more, visit the Totem Technologies website. I’m Derek Miller from the Salt Lake House speaking on business.


This press release was produced by the Salt Lake City House. The opinions expressed are those of the author.


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Salt lake city government

Governor Cox, Lieutenant Governor Henderson, President Adams and President Wilson Respond to Federal Government Mandates on Vaccines


Keywords: COVID-19

SALT LAKE CITY (September 17, 2021) – Governor Spencer J. Cox and Lieutenant Governor Deidre Henderson unite in legislative leadership and join President J. Stuart Adams and President Brad Wilson against blatant federal mandates and overbreadth Regarding President Biden mandate on COVID-19 vaccines:

“The president’s unilateral decision to force American companies to impose COVID-19 vaccines as a condition of employment goes well beyond his authority. Not only does this mandate violate its previous promises, but this declaration violates the principles and processes that are the foundation of good government. As elected officials, we will not turn a blind eye to this seizure of power and will do our part to ensure that the principles of the separation of powers and individual freedom are respected.

“We reaffirm our continued support for the vaccination effort. Vaccines have proven to be the single most effective step we can take to reduce the pressure on our hospitals and save lives. However, requiring employers to impose these decisions on their employees is not the role of government and should not become the new precedent. ”

Download a copy of this press release here.

###


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Salt lake city government

Governor Cox provides update on arrival of Afghan refugees in Utah


SALT LAKE CITY (September 15, 2021) – Today, the US State Department confirmed that Utah can expect to resettle 765 incoming Afghans in the coming months. The first Afghans in this group will begin arriving in October, although details on the timing are still being worked out. Governor Cox made the following statement on what we know so far:

“We are working closely with the Utah Refugee Services Office, resettlement agencies, humanitarian groups, private sector leaders, Afghans in Utah and engaged citizens to put processes in place for support newcomers. We are grateful for providing a safe landing place for 765 Afghans and recognize the new perspectives and compassion they will bring to our State.

“There is still work to be done to prepare and we are awaiting further information from the State Department. We have a fantastic record in refugee resettlement with our resettlement agencies: Catholic Community Services and International Rescue Committee. We know they will use their expertise to make this transition a smooth one, and we will have resources ready to fill in the gaps and offer support in this process.

Last update

  • Today, the US State Department informed the state of Utah that it is authorized to receive 765 Afghan refugees. This number may change in the future and is in addition to the state’s plan to resettle more refugees in the coming year.
  • The International Rescue Committee (IRC) and Catholic Community Services (CCS) are the state’s two resettlement agencies and manage the resettlement of all refugees who come to the state. Donations and volunteers are welcome for both agencies.
  • Currently, most of these refugees are on military bases in the United States. They received security checks, medical assessments and vaccinations. They are expected to start traveling to other states, including Utah, after Oct. 1, and relocation agencies will be given a week’s notice prior to their arrival. Arrivals are expected to take several months.
  • The Governor’s Refugee Advisory Council has brought together three working groups – housing, basic needs and community – to prepare for the arrival of Afghan refugees. These working groups bring together businesses, homeowners, government agencies, advocacy groups, service providers and the public to meet the needs of newcomers.
  • This group of refugees will include a large number of humanitarian parolees who have been evacuated due to their vulnerabilities but who have not yet been granted refugee or asylum status. Humanitarian parolees can apply for asylum, which currently takes around two years, although there are discussions to speed up the process. They will be eligible to work in Utah and will receive employment assistance from the Department of Workforce Services, however, they are not currently eligible for other benefits. The State Department offers this population a small monetary assistance for reception and placement (R&P).
  • In order to provide benefits to humanitarian parolees, the US Congress will consider an ongoing resolution that would include $ 6.4 billion to assist with the resettlement of refugees, including humanitarian parolees. The deadline for passage is October 1st.
  • For general information about the Utah State Refugee Resettlement Program, visit the Office of Refugee Services (RSO) at jobs.utah.gov/refugees.
  • To assist with the resettlement of refugees, please support Utah resettlement agencies:
    • International Rescue Committee: https://www.rescue.org/announcement/how-help-our-afghan-neighbors-utah
    • Catholic Community Services: https://ccsutah.org/news/item/262-how-y
    • The two resettlement agencies, IRC and CCS, provide initial resettlement services to newly arrived refugees, including picking them up at the airport, providing them with accommodation, furniture and food, initial orientation and support. additional services. Their support is continuous for the first three months and in some cases up to six months. These will also be the agencies that will welcome the Afghan arrivals.
    • The Utah State Office of Refugee Services (RSO) provides funding for case management support for up to two years, which is provided by the IRC and CCS. Refugees can access services funded by the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR within the Office of the US Department of Health and Human Services). RSO manages the distribution of funding, which pays for English language learning, school support, youth mentorship, and medical support. RSO also provides refugees with access to training and education, employment and career assistance, support for community-based refugee organizations, a gathering place at the Utah Refugee Center, and social workers. approved clinics for ongoing mental health assistance. The Utah Refugee Center also provides walk-in support for any services refugees may need.

For more details, please visit the following sites:

Utah Refugee Services Office

Utah Catholic Community Services

International Rescue Committee

Download a copy of this press release here.

###


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Salt lake city government

Salt Lake County Government: Tips for Improving Home Air Quality During Wildfires


August 6, 2021

With smoke from wildfires having become more of a concern recently as fires burn in several western states, air quality experts from the Salt Lake County Department of Health warn that even if you are not not in the immediate vicinity of a fire, smoke imported by weather systems can still be a health problem, especially for people with underlying health conditions.

Smoke can enter a home through natural routes such as open doors or windows, mechanical routes such as an HVAC system, or through the infiltration of cracks or small openings in the structure.

The following tips are based on EPA guidelines and may vary depending on your location in relation to a fire, but they are generally among the most effective ways to improve the indoor air quality in your home and protect your health when the outdoor air quality is poor. because of the smoke from forest fires.

Reducing overall exposure to smoke during wildfires is the best thing you can do to protect your lung health. This is especially important for vulnerable populations such as children and the elderly or if you have pre-existing heart or lung disease. For more information, visit epa.gov/smoke-ready-toolbox-wildfires.


This press release was produced by the Salt Lake County Government. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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Salt lake city

The University of Utah: Center for Student Equity and Belonging


Pamela Bishop: Hello everyone, my name is Pamela Bishop (her) and I am the Director of Marketing and Communications for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI).

Today I’m here to talk about some of the changes happening in equity, diversity and inclusion, and I have two special guests with me. We have Tricia Sugiyama (her / her), who is the director of the Center for Ethnic Student Affairs, and we also have Dan Cairo (he / him / her) who is the special assistant to the vice-president for equity, the Diversity and Inclusion responsible for strategy and operations.

And they’re going to talk a little bit about what’s going on in EDI.

Tricia, I understand that there are a lot of changes happening in CESA. Can you tell me a bit what’s going on?

Tricia Sugiyama: Oh Pamela, thank you. I’m so glad you asked. So, in addition to the growth of our team, we are excited to present a new program that will provide support to students and critical areas such as mental health and student leadership, but on top of that we are very happy to ” announce a new look and a new name for our center which will be the Center for Equity and Student Belonging.

Pamela Bishop: Wow, that’s awesome! Thus, the CESA is transformed into a Center for equity and student belonging. Looks like the acronym is CESB. Was it on purpose?

Tricia Sugiyama: It was! It was because we really wanted to honor who we were and look to the future of what we become.

Pamela Bishop: Awesome. So, what motivated this change from CESA to CESB, as we’ll call it?

Tricia Sugiyama: As the University of Utah continues to grow and change, so does our office. Thus, this fall, CESA will experience a jump. Moving from the 1960s Center for Minorities to the 1970s era of the Center for Ethnic Student Affairs, we now look to the future as we align with the new Equity, Diversity and Inclusion division and focus on service to the increasingly diverse student body at U by becoming the Center for Student Equity and Belonging.

Pamela Bishop: So, Dan, tell us. What do you think this means for the students?

Daniel K. Cairo: Thank you. I’m glad you asked that question because all of the work we do is really for the students, isn’t it?

People who knew about CESA, you were lucky if you found out who the center was and then connected with them, but a lot of our students who keep coming to U, don’t know that this space exist.

So what this means for the students… it means that before the first day of school, our goal is to make sure they know who we are. They know how CESB is a place where they can build a community, where they can get support, where they can really develop both their academic skills and their social skills and they can create a belonging here on campus.

But it’s not just that, right? It’s not just about coming in and staying connected with CESB. It’s about how our center, our communities and our partnerships truly support them on their journey through the institution. If you have first generation students, new to the state, or whatever they are, they have a support network at CESB – and not just there, but a support network that allows them to move around the world. campus.

If engineering sounds scary, hey, you don’t have to! We are actually here to support you and be there with you and also nurture your own development. If art scares you, hey, we have some great friends at the College of Fine Arts that you can connect with.

This therefore means that it is a support network that allows students to flourish and achieve academic excellence on campus.

Pamela Bishop: It’s awesome. I’m really excited to hear about all of the changes that are happening. It really seems like we’re evolving, like you said Tricia, trying to grow up and be this type of new century CESA and CESB, and I’m just excited to hear it all! So how can people find out more about the new CESB?

Tricia Sugiyama: We would love it.

So this fall, we’ll invite you all to join us for an open house and to celebrate our new name and new look. In addition, we will unveil a new web page that we can find on diversity.utah.edu, and as always we invite you to stop by our space. Come meet our new staff, discover our new design, and then come see us too! We’re in the Union building on the main level across from ASUU, so stop by because we really want to see you in our space.

Pamela Bishop: Well, thank you very much, Tricia and Dan. It has been really great, and I know the students will be excited to see what happens at the new Center for Equity and Student Belonging. Thank you.


This press release was produced by University of Utah. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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Utah economy

Great American Outdoors Act Anniversary Announces Free Day on Public Lands this Week – St George News

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Undated 2017 file photo shows hiker descending Angels Landing Road with nearly 1,000-foot falls on both sides, Zion National Park, Utah | Photo by Caitlin This / Zion National Park, St. George News

ST. GEORGE – On Wednesday, designated as “Great American Outdoors Day”, the Home Office will celebrate the first anniversary of the signing of the Great American Outdoors Act. The law, which was passed with strong bipartisan support, makes unprecedented investments in national parks, public lands and Native American schools.

Hiked Snow Canyon State Park, Utah, date unspecified | Photo courtesy of Red Mountain Resort, St. George News

To support the department’s commitment to ensure equitable access to public lands, entrance fees will be removed on Wednesday on all fee-paying public lands managed by the department, according to a press release issued by the department. Other charges, such as overnight camping, cabin rentals, group daytime use, and use of special areas, remain in effect.

“Creating new jobs and growing our economy is a top priority for the Biden-Harris administration. Through the Great American Outdoors Act, we are investing in the American people and in the future of our public lands and sacred spaces, ”Home Secretary Deb Haaland said in the press release. “I invite all Americans to experience the beauty and bounty of our nation’s public lands – not just August 4, but every day of the year.”

The Great American Outdoors Act helps support the goals of President Joe Biden’s America the Beautiful initiative to support locally-led efforts to conserve, restore and protect lands and waters across the country to help cope with crises in the climate and biodiversity, increase equitable access to wide open spaces and strengthen the economy, the statement said.

This summer is particularly busy on many public lands. While most of the 423 national parks are open, visitors may find limited services in and around the national parks. Check each park’s websites or download the NPS app for specific details on their operations. Learn more about alternatives to popular parks on the Interior blog. Public land enthusiasts are encouraged to similarly plan their visits with the Bureau of Land Management and the Fish and Wildlife Service.

Photo by Yobro10 / iStock / Getty Images Plus, St. George News

The Act provides for full and permanent funding of the Land and Water Conservation Fund to the tune of $ 900 million per year. The Land and Water Conservation Fund was established by Congress in 1964 to fulfill a bipartisan commitment to protect the nation’s natural areas, water resources, and cultural heritage, and to provide recreational opportunities for all Americans.

The Act also established the National Parks and Public Lands Heritage Restoration Fund to provide the necessary maintenance of essential facilities on public lands and Indian schools. The projects funded by the restoration will help reduce Interior’s deferred maintenance backlog by more than $ 22 billion and improve recreation facilities, dams, water and utility infrastructure, schools and other historic structures. Other projects aim to increase public access by restoring and repairing roads, trails, bridges and parking areas.

By FY2022, Great American Outdoors Act-funded indoor projects are expected to support more than 17,000 jobs and generate $ 1.8 billion in local communities. Between the funding planned for FY2021 and the funding proposed for FY2022, Interior has deferred maintenance plans for the Legacy Restoration Fund in all 50 states and several U.S. territories.

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.

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Utah economy

Representative Buck is Co-Founder of New Anti-Big Tech Caucus

Rep. Ken Buck, a Republican from the 4th Congressional District of Colorado, and Rep. Lance Gooden (R-Texas) announced on Thursday the creation of the Freedom from Big Tech Caucus.

According to a press Release by Buck, big tech companies “rig the free market, crush competitors, stifle innovation, draw closer to China, and censor Americans.” Big tech companies are operating in an “America last” mindset that has hurt consumers and small businesses across the country while benefiting China and strengthening their gatekeeper power. “

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The press release says the Freedom from Big Tech Caucus will promote competition and innovation, restore the free digital economy, protect children from harmful online content, protect online privacy and data, end the political censorship and thwart Big Tech’s “court” towards the Chinese. Communist Party.

Buck is the leading member of the Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law, which published a 450-page article report last year on its Big Tech investigation. The report declared that Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google had abused their power as monopolies, and he recommended changes to current antitrust laws. Representative Joe Neguse, a Democrat from Colorado’s 2nd Congressional District, is also a member of the committee. Despite different political affiliations, Neguse and Buck have found common ground when it comes to Big Tech: Both representatives believe Congress must take action to limit the power of Big Tech.

Last month, the House Judiciary Committee approved “A Stronger Online Economy: Opportunity, Innovation and Choice,” a package of bills aimed at reducing the power of Big Tech. According to The Washington Post, a bill would prevent tech giants from buying growing competitors, a bill would prohibit large tech companies from giving preference to their own products over the products or services of competing companies, and a bill would make it easier for consumers to use the products of different technology companies together. Buck was an original co-sponsor on all bills in the package.

Democratic representatives are primarily concerned about the market power of Big Tech companies, while many Republican representatives are concerned about what they perceive to be anti-conservative bias in Big Tech.

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) criticized the Big Tech package, saying the bills won’t do enough to stop Big Tech from censoring conservative voices. In an opinion piece, Jordan wrote, “Make no mistake, Big Tech is trying to get conservatives and needs to be brought under control. But these bills do nothing to combat anti-conservative biases and Big Tech censorship. These Democratic bills will only make matters worse. If you think Big Tech is bad now, wait until Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google are colluding with Big Government.

During the debate on these bills, Buck appeared to attempt to appeal directly to Republicans such as Jordan, declaring, “These bills are conservative,” in his opening statement.

Buck also shares Jordan’s belief that Big Tech is censoring conservative voices. On June 2, Buck tweeted that “Facebook censors conservative voices, but they allow Communist China to mock and disseminate genocidal propaganda,” in connection with an article from the Media Research Center, a conservative content analysis group that described himself as “a liberal media watchdog”.

It’s unclear when the bills will go to a full vote in the House of Representatives, according to to Representative Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), House Majority Leader and responsible for scheduling House votes.

Gooden, who will serve as the Freedom from Big Tech Caucus co-chair, said the caucus will help prevent what he sees as the exclusion of conservative views. “Big Tech has complete control over the digital public square, ensuring that Americans only see news and information that matches their narrative, which often excludes conservative views,” Gooden said.

Representative Madison Cawthorn (RN.C.), who is vice-chair of the Freedom from Big Tech Caucus, said in a declaration Friday: “For too long, Big-Tech has abused its powers and targeted the constitutional rights of American citizens. The high-tech oligarchs, who silence freedom-loving patriots, have no place in the land of the free. In America, we must always place constitutional values ​​on authoritarian control. “

Other members of the Freedom from Big Tech Caucus include Rep. Burgess Owens (R-Utah) and Rep. Paul Gosar (R-Arizona).

Big Tech generally refers to big tech companies like Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. Some Big Tech definitions also include Microsoft, but the Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law Subcommittee’s Investigation Report on Digital Markets Competition focused on Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google.

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Utah economy

One of Utah’s most unique natural treasures is disappearing


The Great Salt Lake is also known as the American Dead Sea – due to its resemblance to its much smaller Middle Eastern counterpart – but scientists fear the nickname will soon take on new meaning.

Human consumption and diversion of water has long depleted Lake Utah. His level today is a few inches from a low of 58, state officials say, and Drought conditions in the west fueled by the climate crisis have exacerbated conditions.

The worst part? It’s only july, and the lake historically does not reach its annual minimum until October.

“I’ve never seen it so bad – not in my lifetime,” said Andy Wallace, hovering over the water in a propeller plane, as he did for years as a pilot. professional.

Simply put, the largest salt lake in the Western Hemisphere is shrinking rapidly. Left alone, the lake’s footprint would stretch over 2,100 square miles, more than three times the area of ​​Houston. An analysis released last year showed that water siphoned from the rivers that feed the natural wonder had reduced its level by 11 feet, depleting the lake’s area by more than half.

“Twenty years ago it was under about 10 feet of water,” said Kevin Perry, chairman of the atmospheric science department at the University of Utah, as he rode his bike in July on the dry lake bed.

Dying organisms and arsenic

Perry and other scientists fear they are witnessing a slow-motion disaster. Ten million birds flock to the Great Salt Lake every year to feed on its now struggling marine life. More pelicans breed here than anywhere else in the country.

The problem goes up the food chain. The Utah Geological Survey openly expressed concern on Thursday that the falling lake levels threaten to kill microbials – reef-like underwater mounds that help feed the brine flies, brine shrimp and hence the 338 species of birds that visit each year.

“We consider these structures to be living rocks,” said Michael Vanden Berg, head of the investigation’s energy and mineral program. “The population of the Great Salt Lake is one of the largest accumulations of modern microbials in the world.”

If the lake continues to retreat to historic levels, a hitherto unseen proportion of the lake’s microbials will be exposed, according to a press release. It may only take weeks for the microbial mat to erode from “living rocks,” he said, and it could take years to recover, even if lake levels return to normal.

Brine shrimp, also known as sea monkeys, also struggle with the increasing salinity that comes with less water. It’s not just bird food. They are exported as fish food, and the commercial harvest contributes to an estimated $ 1.5 billion in savings – which, along with recreation and mineral extraction, helps feed the fishermen and others living around the Great Lake. Dirty.

The economic downturn is not the only threat to humans in the region. Utah’s soil is naturally high in arsenic, a toxic compound that causes a frightening range of health problems. When it washes downstream, it lands in the lake, Perry said. When the wind blows, as it regularly does quite violently, it lifts the dusty bed of the lake.

“One of our concerns is that the particles that come out of the lake get into people’s lungs,” he said. “Fifteen to twenty years ago, when the lake was higher, most of those dust spots were covered, and if you cover them with water, they don’t produce dust. And so as the lake receded, it’s more and more exposed more of that lake bed. … As we get more area, we have more frequent dust storms. “

Owens Lake, a mostly dry lake east of California’s Sequoia National Forest, was diverted to the Los Angeles Aqueduct nearly a century ago, Perry noted. Although a little water returns to the lake, its dry bed is the biggest source of PM-10 pollution – large inhalable dust particles – in the country. Great Salt Lake is much larger than Owens Lake, and while the population around Owens Lake is approximately 40,000, there are over 2 million people living around Great Salt Lake, Perry points out.

“This lake could also become one of the largest sources of dust emissions in North America,” he said. “Right now the lake bed is protected by a fragile crust, and if that crust is disturbed or eroded over time, then this lake could start to emit a lot more (dust).”

“We are on the verge of a catastrophe”

Vast swathes of Lake Utah look more like Death Valley than any waterway, with the ground arid and fractured by dry heat. Other areas look like sprawling puddles. Birds wade through the mud of the shore alongside empty marinas, their holds sagging to the ground.

“The saltiest sailors on the planet have seen their sailboats hoisted out of the marinas of the Great Salt Lake by a crane in recent days, due to the drop in the level of the lake”, the Utah Rivers Board wrote in the introduction of a report warning that a proposed dam, pipeline and reservoir in the east will only exacerbate the problems.

While human behavior remains the primary concern of scientists, the lack of rain in the west does not help. The Great Salt Lake is now like water on a plate, while most lakes look like a cup, said Jaimi Butler, co-editor of the 2020 analysis showing that the lake’s area has shrunk by 51% .

Shallow waters are more prone to evaporation in drought conditions, and although the lake level fluctuates in any given year, the lake tends to bottom out in the fall, around October. The lake will continue to drop and shrink over the next three months, and the water level could drop as much as 2 more feet by Halloween, Butler suspects.

“Keeping water in the Great Salt Lake is the most important thing that keeps me awake at night,” said Butler, a wildlife biologist who grew up around the lake and who is the coordinator of the Great Salt Lake Institute of Canada. Westminster College. “We are on the brink of disaster.”

Mother Nature and the inhabitants must join forces

Butler cried as he thought of the ramifications of not taking strong action to save the waterway.

“The Great Salt Lake will be an environmental, economic and, really, cultural disaster at the same time,” she said. “I grew up here. A place becomes you.… We are all from Great Salt Lake. We all are, and we shouldn’t let it go.”

Humans created the problem, and humans will have to be part of the solution, she said. Reducing water use and increasing water utility tariffs to deter waste would be a start, she added.

Despite warning bells, water destined for Great Salt Lake continues to be diverted to farms, ranches and towns – the latter enjoying some of the cheapest water in the country, Butler said.

Salt Lake City residents paid one of the lowest water rates in major US cities, according to an analysis by Circle of Blue, a nonprofit organization that advocates for responsible management of water resources. A family of four using 100 gallons per day paid $ 32 per month in 2018, about half of what New Yorkers paid, one-third of what Atlanteans paid, and a quarter of what San Franciscans paid that year. Among the larger cities, only the people of Memphis paid less.

But it appears residents around the Great Salt Lake have acted more conscientiously, said Marcie McCartney, water conservation and education manager for the Utah Water Resources Division.

“Everyone around and in this basin is doing everything they can to use the water as efficiently as possible,” she said. “We are seeing a lot of (water) savings this year, which is great, but the Great Salt Lake is definitely suffering, and the only way to increase the level of these lakes is a better year of water for our mantle. snowy.”

Those responsible for monitoring snow runoff in streams and reservoirs must calculate the amount of water needed for water supplies – potable, agricultural, etc. – and the rest can be dumped downstream into the Great Salt Lake, McCartney said. This year’s “poor snowpack” has melted too quickly, she said, “and the ground is really thirsty.”

“Mother Nature is going to take her share first, and we’ll have the rest,” she said.

In November, Butler co-wrote an obituary for Great Salt Lake in Catalyst Magazine, based in the Utah capital.

“The Great Salt Lake experienced its last sparkling sunset today, succumbing to a long struggle with chronic diversions exacerbated by climate change,” he began. “Its dusty remains will be scattered throughout the Salt Lake Valley for millennia – our air quality monitors will constantly remind us of its passage.”

The article laid out the history of the reservoir, how it ended up in dire straits, and what the affected Utahans can do to change the narrative and amplify their voices to save the beloved body of water.

“There were measures to prevent the death of the Great Salt Lake, but it was too little, too late,” the obituary read. “She has supported Utah’s economy for many years, but we haven’t adequately funded her health care on time. If we had, we might not be mourning her death today. ‘hui. “

Speaking to CNN, Butler reiterated many of those points, imploring, “We have changed our world and we need to change our behaviors to conserve incredible ecosystems that include humans like here in Great Salt Lake.”

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Utah economy

AM News Brief: State Revenue Gains, Drinking Water Contaminant, Man Found Incompetent in LDS Church Shooting Trial

Wednesday morning July 14, 2021

state

First data shows revenue gains for the state

Preliminary data shows that the total revenue of the state of Utah increased by more than 30% at the end of fiscal 2021 compared to last year. In a press release, the Utah state legislature said the results included data from the Utah State Tax Commission. Officials said incomes rose more than economists expected, indicating strong economic growth from the COVID-19 pandemic and the economic downturn. The statement added that the impact of federal stimulus measures on the state and individuals throughout the year – and how much that boosted the economy – is still uncertain. He suggested that the infusion of federal funds might have created a one-time support effect that won’t help revenues in the future. Year-end figures are still provisional and subject to final accounting adjustments. – Pamela mccall

Special units to correct conviction errors

Utah passed a law last year allowing prosecutors to create special units to review previous convictions. At least four counties now have them: Salt Lake, Utah, Davis, and Summit. Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said his office had an obligation to correct any mistakes he made in the past. But lawyers in rural counties may find it more difficult to create these teams because there may not be enough lawyers practicing in these areas. Read the full story. – Sonja hutson

Region / Nation

Man found unfit to stand trial in Nevada church shooting

The man charged with a 2018 shooting at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Fallon, Nevada, has been ruled unfit to stand trial. John O’Connor, 51, is said to have killed one man and injured another during Sunday services. The Lahontan Valley News reported a the judge made his decision on Tuesday based on his finding that O’Connor is unable to assist in his defense. O’Connor has been held in a mental institution since September 2018, when a judge made a similar finding. He pleaded not guilty to four counts, including first degree murder. – Associated press

Accomplice sentenced in adoption fraud case

An Arizona woman has been sentenced to two years in prison as part of an illegal adoption program involving a former politician and women from the Marshall Islands. Lynwood Jennet helped submit bogus claims for birth mothers to receive state-funded health coverage under the leadership of Paul Petersen. He’s a Republican who was a Maricopa County assessor for six years and an adoption lawyer. Petersen has pleaded guilty to crimes related to the scheme in three states, including Utah. He was sentenced to one to 15 years in Utah for a human trafficking conviction. – Associated press

The way to regulate drinking water contaminants

This week, the United States Environmental Protection Agency included a new family of chemicals in his latest draft of drinking water contaminants. These are a group of man-made chemicals that stay a very long time, including in the human body. They are also believed to be prevalent in our drinking water. These are called per- and polyfluoroalkylated substances, also known as PFAS. The EPA’s proposal to include PFAS in its list of water contaminants lays the groundwork for potential regulation in the future. But first, the agency proposes to monitor drinking water for some of these chemicals in order to get a better idea of ​​their prevalence. – Maggie Mullen, Mountain West Information Office

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Utah economy

GATHERING IN THE WEST | Hungry grasshoppers threaten the routes; New Mexico Offers Job Bonuses New

MONTANA

Stimulated by drought, grasshoppers threaten rangelands

BILLINGS – A severe drought in the western United States dries up rivers, starts wildfires and forces farmers to search for water. Next: an invasion of voracious locusts.

Federal agriculture officials are launching what could become their biggest grasshopper destruction campaign since the 1980s amid an outbreak of drought-loving insects that cattle ranchers fear will strip public ranges and private.

Grasshoppers thrive in hot, dry weather, and populations were already on the rise last year, paving the way for an even larger epidemic in 2021. Such outbreaks could become more frequent as climate change alters patterns of disease. precipitation, the scientists said.

To lessen the economic damage from grasshoppers, the United States Department of Agriculture began aerial spraying of the pesticide diflubenzuron in late June to kill grasshopper nymphs before they become adults. About 3,000 square miles of Montana is expected to be sprayed, about double the size of Rhode Island.

The scale of the program has alarmed environmentalists who say the widespread spraying will kill many insects, including spiders and other grasshopper predators as well as ailing species such as monarch butterflies. They also fear pesticides could ruin organic farms adjacent to spray areas.

A typical infestation can wipe out 20% of range fodder and have an impact of $ 900 million, according to a 2012 University of Wyoming study cited by federal officials.

Drought benefits grasshoppers in part because it reduces the exposure of grasshopper eggs to deadly pests that need moisture, said Chelse Prather, an insect ecologist at the University of Dayton.

This year’s outbreak will peak in about two months, Prather said, when the insects grow to 2 to 3 inches in length and become so widespread that they will begin to eat more plant material than livestock.

NEW MEXICO

State job seekers can get a federal bonus of $ 1,000

SANTA FE – Federal relief funds will be used to provide back-to-work bonuses of up to $ 1,000 to New Mexico residents who find employment in the coming weeks and stop receiving insurance benefits- unemployment, state labor officials said on July 2.

New Mexico Democratic Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham’s program aims to encourage a return to work before federal unemployment supplements expire in early September.

New child support payments gradually drop from $ 1,000 to $ 400 by the end of July, providing a larger payment sooner a job is secure. The federal supplement provides an additional $ 300 per week in addition to state unemployment benefits.

Polis rejects Colorado GOP delegation's call to end extra unemployment benefits

Some companies have complained that the increase in federal assistance for the unemployed – especially the additional $ 300 per week benefit, intended to cushion the economic blow of the pandemic – has discouraged people from seeking employment. But other factors have also reportedly contributed to the shortage of people re-seeking work, ranging from difficulty arranging or paying for childcare services to lingering fears of COVID-19.

In response to criticism of the length of extended unemployment benefits, dozens of states began to drop extended federal aid in June.

More than 70,000 New Mexico residents receive unemployment insurance. On July 1, state health officials lifted the latest restrictions on business occupancy and public gatherings, opening up the economy as vaccination rates exceed 62%.

The Department of Workforce Solutions says it expects up to 15,000 people to take advantage of the return-to-work program at a total cost of up to $ 10.1 million.

Recall petition begins against Cowboys for Trump founder

SANTA FE – A political committee has started circulating a petition to remove Cowboys or Trump founder Couy Griffin from his public service as commissioner in Otero County.

The Couy Griffin Recall Committee said on July 1 in a press release that it had started collecting signatures in a bid to schedule a recall election.

The petition alleges Griffin neglected and abused his post as county commissioner while skipping public meetings and promoting a support group for President Donald Trump that Griffin treated like a for-profit business.

Recall Polis Group Adds Secretary of State Griswold to Recall List;  end of July drop in petitions expected

Griffin, elected in 2018, says the allegations in the petition are frivolous and without merit. Separately, Griffin faces federal charges in connection with the siege of the U.S. Capitol on Jan.6, where he appeared on an outdoor patio and attempted to lead a prayer.

The recall committee is due to collect approximately 1,540 signatures from registered voters in the Griffin district to trigger a vote on whether Griffin remains in office until 2022.

Otero County Clerk Robyn Holmes said a successful petition would put the question on the November general election ballot for local and non-partisan races.

Colorado Politics’ Insider newsletter tells you everything you need to know about the latest news from the Colorado political arena. Subscribe via the newsletter button on our home page.

IDAHO

Orthwestern Band of Shoshone sues Idaho over hunting rights

BOISE – The Northwestern Shoshone Nation Band is suing Idaho Governor Brad Little and state wildlife officials in federal court, claiming the state wrongly denied hunting rights to the tribe secured by the Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868.

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Idaho in June, asks a judge to declare the Northwest Band protected under the treaty. State attorneys did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

At first glance, the legal matter might boil down to whether any of the Native American leaders who signed the treaty represented the Northwestern Band along with other bands of the Shoshone Nation, and whether the Northwestern Band itself remained a cohesive unit at the time. since.

But at the heart of the dispute is a dilemma faced by many Native American governments across the United States who sometimes find themselves at odds with game wardens, mining companies, water users, or other groups as ‘They are trying to preserve their use of the land promised to them. in treaties signed centuries ago.

Governor signs bills on elections, tribal nations and broadband expansion

Today, the Northwestern Band has no reserve land and its tribal offices are in Brigham City, Utah. Historically, band members spent time fishing near what is now Salmon, Idaho, hunted big game in western Wyoming, and hunted and congregated in southern Idaho and the ‘Utah. Winters were often spent in Southeast Idaho.

According to the lawsuit, the state of Idaho does not recognize that the Northwestern bands of the Shoshone Nation were part of the Fort Bridger Treaty and does not believe that members of the government-recognized Northwest Band federal have the right to hunt on unoccupied land. in accordance with the treaty.

In 1997, two brothers and tribesmen of the Northwestern Band were convicted of off-season hunting in Idaho, despite having hunting badges issued by the Northwestern Band. Shane and Wayde Warner appealed their convictions, claiming Treaty rights at Fort Bridger.

WYOMING

Drunk and messy Yellowstone tourist gets 60 days in jail

JACKSON – A tourist in Yellowstone National Park was sentenced to 60 days in jail and banned from entering the park for five years after pleading guilty to disorderly driving and other charges involving unrest that erupted when a guide brought down refused to take tourist’s group in kayak because the group was too drunk to go.

Prosecutors said Kyle Campbell, 31, of Fairmont, Indiana, made threatening comments and kicked park officers as he resisted arrest in the incident.

Committees met to advise re-introduction of wolves in Colorado

Campbell was sentenced on June 23 by US trial judge Mark L. Carman in Mammoth. Campbell also faces five years of unsupervised probation and has been ordered to pay more than $ 1,550 in fines, according to a statement by Acting US Attorney Bob Murray that was reported by the Jackson Hole News & Guide.

“We understand that people are eager to get out this summer and enjoy our national parks; however, this type of behavior is unacceptable,” Murray said.

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Salt lake city government

1,149 weekend COVID-19 cases, 7 deaths, over 13,000 vaccinations reported as Utah hits 70% vaccine target


Jamie Bone, a nurse with the Davis County Department of Health, prepares a syringe of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the Legacy Center Indoor Arena in Farmington on Tuesday, January 12, 2021. Seventy percent of all adults in Utah now have at least a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, Governor Spencer Cox’s office confirmed on Tuesday. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah Department of Health reported the following update on COVID-19 in the state from Saturday to Tuesday:

  • 1,149 new cases
  • 7 deaths
  • 13,878 vaccines administered

The seven-day moving average for positive cases in the state is now 386 per day.

Seventy percent of all adults in Utah now have at least a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, Governor Spencer Cox’s office has confirmed Tuesday, although the state appears to be using outdated demographics to calculate that vaccination rate.

The governor’s office had set a goal of seeing 70% of Utahns aged 18 and over receive at least their first shot of the vaccine by July 4. The state achieved that target on Tuesday.

“This is really a milestone that deserves to be celebrated,” Cox’s office said on Twitter. “Most of all, we are grateful to all the nurses, doctors, healthcare workers, hospitals and volunteers… who continue to work tirelessly to get us all vaccinated!

Since July 4, the Utah Department of Health reported that 65.2% of adults in Utah had received at least their first dose, Cox’s office said. However, that percentage does not include 114,908 doses of the vaccine that were administered in Utah by federal government agencies such as the Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, and Indian Health Services.

With those additional doses, 1,596,999 Utahns received their first dose of vaccine, Cox’s office said. The governor’s office reported that Utah’s adult population was 2,274,774, so about 70.2% of the adult population now has at least their first dose.

“And that number will only increase,” Cox’s office tweeted.

But that’s an older figure for the population of Utah. The United States Census Bureau most recent data estimates the total population of Utah at approximately 3,271,616, of which approximately 948,769, or 29%, are under the age of 18. Using this data, the percentage of Utah adults who receive at least a first dose is closer to 68.75%.

However, Utah executives, including Cox, said the 70% target was somewhat arbitrary. They will continue to work to vaccinate as many people and exceed the statewide target of 70%, the governor’s office added in a statement on Tuesday. Press release.

“Even if we hit 70%, that doesn’t mean it’s the end of the game,” Cox said at a press conference last week.

Cox’s office thanked those who got vaccinated, as well as the Utah Department of Health and local state health departments for their efforts to get as many people vaccinated as possible.

“They have been striving to take the initiative to set up mass vaccination sites statewide and continue to provide vaccines in their communities,” the press release said.

Cox’s office also thanked the Salt Lake Chamber for launching the “Bring it Home” campaign, which encourages companies to support employees who want to get vaccinated.

Cox’s office added that the pandemic is not over and the state is not out of the woods just yet. Utah has seen a small increase in the number of new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, which is believed to be mainly due to the spread of the delta variant among unvaccinated people.

“We are still very concerned about the recent increase in cases and hospitalizations,” the statement said. “And parts of the state, including many of our rural areas and communities of color, remain under 70% immunized.”

This story will be updated.

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Utah economy

Katherine Heigl joins Wild Horse And Burro Rally at the Utah Capitol – Deadline

Utah’s wild Onaqui horses have a key ally in actress Katherine Heigl, who joined several groups today in the Utah state capital to call attention to a crucial looming roundup. for animals.

Heigl, joined by Animal Wellness Action, the Center for a Humane Economy, the Jason Debus Heigl Foundation, Wild Horse Photo Safaris, the Red Birds Trust and the Cloud Foundation, have come together to raise awareness of the plight of horses, which face a massive helicopter raid from July 12.

The roundup. the groups say they will send 80 percent of the herd to BLM corrals, injuring or even killing some of the frightened animals. While the horses will be offered for adoption, groups say some will end up in foreign slaughterhouses.

Related story

“Firefly Lane” renewed for season 2 by Netflix

The Federal Bureau of Land Management, which will handle the roundup, says an overpopulation of horses in the Grand Bassin has left insufficient fodder.

Heigl, a Utah resident best known for her work in the TV series Grey’s Anatomy and now featured in Netflix Alley of fireflies, and leaders of the groups involved, spoke to rally participants before heading straight to the pastures where Onaqui’s wild horses roam free and roam.

On July 1, President Joe Biden’s Bureau of Land Management, dubbed in a press release announcing that they would proceed with the roundups.

“We are doing everything we can to pressure President Joe Biden to stop the roundup and eradication of the iconic wild horses of Onaqui in Utah and call on the president to implement a course correction before he quits. ‘It’s not too late,’ said a statement from Heigl, herself a horse owner.

Erika Brunson, philanthropist and member of the World Council for Animals, also called for an end to the planned roundups.

“With over 52,000 feral horses and burros currently in government facilities, it’s time to stop the roundups and focus on a strong cruelty-free fertility control program using PZP,” Brunson said. “Currently only 1% of the population is approached, which is ridiculous.”

Descended from horses used by pioneers and native tribes in the late 1800s, Onaqui horses are known for their rugged beauty and ability to thrive in the harsh desert environment of the Great Basin of western Utah. . They are a favorite among photographers and wild horse enthusiasts and are considered the most popular and photographed wild herd in the country.

Visit the campaign website at www.SaveTheOnaqui.org for more details.

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Utah economy

Utah Company Develops Sustainable Bitcoin Mining Method; New home sales drop 5.9%

Crypto Coin

A microgrid company in Woods Cross, Utah, may have a solution to Elon Musk’s sustainability challenge for Bitcoin mining.

“Cryptocurrency is a good idea on many levels and we think it has a bright future, but it can’t come at the cost of the environment,” Musk tweeted. “Tesla has suspended purchases of vehicles using Bitcoin (because) we are concerned about the increasing use of fossil fuels for Bitcoin mining and transactions, especially coal, which has the worst emissions of all fuels. “

CleanSpark is a company that uses microgrid technology to improve the efficiency of Bitcoin mining operations and other applications. The existing network supplies electricity from a power plant to users. Microgrids combine the traditional grid with solar, wind, fuel cell and other green technologies to balance the load requirements between various sources with the aim of ensuring clean energy at a good price.
CleanSpark.com

CleanSpark uses microgrid technology to improve the efficiency of Bitcoin mining operations and other applications.

The existing grid supplies electricity from a power plant to users. For most people, connecting to the network is as easy as inserting a plug into a wall outlet.

Microgrids combine the traditional grid with solar, wind, fuel cell and other green technologies to balance the load requirements between various sources with the aim of ensuring clean energy at a good price.

Microgrids could be a suitable response to growing concerns about the energy source used in Bitcoin mining. The system configuration and the software necessary to run it can be designed to meet specific demands, including future growth.

CleanSpark is also a Bitcoin miner and recently invested in new energy efficient equipment to increase its hash rate and reduce power consumption.

The company is publicly traded, but so far it is only covered by two analysts. CleanSpark shares recently hit $ 16.51 per share. The consensus price target, or fair value estimate, is $ 47.50.

Competitors include Tata Power Solar, Longi, Acme Climate Solution and d.light design.

A report from Navigant Research, a company based in Boulder, Colo., Said the modular microgrid market is expected to grow at a compound annual rate of 28% between 2020 and 2029.

“Although they are only a minority of the market when measured by peak capacity, modular microgrids have the potential to constitute the majority of systems deployed over the next decade,” said Peter Asmus. , Navigant Research Director, in a report. “Adopting a modular approach should help dramatically increase microgrid deployments by commoditizing off-the-shelf microgrid offerings that can be replicated, thereby reducing design and deployment costs. “

The Crypto Climate Accord, based on the Paris Climate Agreement, is a private sector initiative aimed at decarbonizing the cryptocurrency industry.

“For climate advocates, we can eliminate emissions from a rapidly growing source of electrical charge,” the agreement says. “For the clean tech industry, we can bring in a whole new class of customers with significant demand for low carbon solutions. For the crypto industry, we can help support the widespread adoption of crypto by making the industry more sustainable.

It is signed by the major companies in the sector.

The Center for Alternative Finance at the University of Cambridge has estimated that 39% of the energy used by crypto miners is powered by renewable resources, mostly hydroelectric.

In a related case, the US Department of Commerce banned six Chinese producers of raw materials and components for the solar industry amid allegations of human rights violations against ethnic minorities.

The action could boost the U.S. solar industry.

Logo of the Association of Solar Energy Industries
The solar energy industry in the United States has grown on average 42% annually over the past decade and now employs about 230,000 people in about 10,000 companies in all 50 states, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association.
seia.org

The Solar Energy Industries Association, a Washington-based trade group, said the industry has experienced average annual growth of 42% over the past decade and now employs about 230,000 people at about 10,000 companies in all 50 states.

The industry has the capacity to deliver 100 gigawatts, or enough electricity to power 18.6 million homes, the trade group said.

At midday on Friday, Bitcoin changed hands to $ 33,341.32, down 2.91% in the past 24 hours but up 15.08% for the year. The 24 hour range is $ 33,011.86 to $ 35,200.90. The all-time high is $ 64,829.14. The current market capitalization is $ 624.99 billion, CoinDesk reported.

Pulse Market

The warning signs of the housing market seem to be glaring:

– The US Department of Commerce said new home sales fell 5.9% on an annualized basis.
– House prices are at an all time high.
– The National Association of Realtors said sales of existing homes had declined for four consecutive months.
– Consumer confidence has declined.
– Inflation is on the rise.
– Commodity prices soared as demand increased, pushing up the cost of new homes.

The housing market is a key part of the recovery as the economy emerges from the COVID-19 shutdown. The negative indicators raise a fundamental question: is the housing boom over?

Lisa Shalett, investment director for wealth management at Morgan Stanley, says no.

“We believe that supply disruptions and rapid price appreciation have only interrupted buyers’ confidence and buying behavior in what is expected to be an above-average race for housing. “she said in a research report for the New York investment bank. “In our opinion, the US real estate market has a solid foundation, arguably the best in decades. “

Shalett said many household balance sheets are strong and Millennials have entered their prime of starting a family. Morgan Stanley research estimated that 1.2 million new owner households were created in the past year.

“Anecdotal evidence suggests that the pandemic may have shifted behavioral priorities towards deurbanization and remote working, creating lasting support for housing demand,” the analyst said.

Construction of new homes is about 10 years behind schedule due, in part, to lessons learned from the collapse in the subprime mortgage market that triggered the 2007-2009 recession, the deepest since the Great Depression from the 1930s.

Housing supply growth is now nearly 60% lower than annual household formation, an imbalance that is likely to support single-family home prices, Shalett said.

Lending standards were tightened during the coronavirus pandemic, but have now been relaxed.

“It could help offset rising house prices and mortgage rates,” she said. “With the Federal Reserve last week giving the green light to all major US banks that have undergone its annual stress test, homebuyers could expect even more credit availability.”

The Federal Reserve, the country’s central bank, examined 23 major banks and concluded that each had strong capital reserves and could continue to lend to households and businesses during a severe recession.

“Over the past year, the Federal Reserve has carried out three stress tests with several different hypothetical recessions and all of them have confirmed that the banking system is strongly positioned to support the ongoing recovery,” said Randal K. Quarles, vice -President of supervision, in a press release. Press release.

The Fed’s stress test examines a bank’s resilience by estimating losses, income and capital levels – a cushion against possible losses – and “what if scenarios” over the next nine quarters. Sales of existing homes fell in all regions except the Midwest in May, reported the National Association of Realtors, a Washington-based trading group.

The median price of existing homes of all types in May was $ 350,300, up 23.6% from the same period a year ago. The total housing stock stood at 1.23 million units in May, up 7% from the April total, but down 20.6% from a year ago.

“Home sales declined moderately in May and are now approaching pre-pandemic activity,” Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the NAR, said in a report. “Lack of inventory continues to be the main factor holding back home sales, but declining affordability is simply excluding some first-time buyers from the market. “

The outlook, however, is encouraging.

“Supply is expected to improve,” he said, “which will give buyers more options and help lower record asking prices for existing homes.”

The National Mortgage Bankers Association, a Washington-based trade group, said loan applications fell 6.9% for the week ended June 25 from the previous week, reaching their lowest level in about 18 month.

The average interest rate for a 30-year fixed rate mortgage guaranteed by the Federal Housing Administration fell to 3.19% from 3.21%.

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Salt lake city

The University of Utah: Building More Inclusive Systems


June 25, 2021

“These are two important changes as we work to create more inclusive systems at U,” said Clare Lemke, director of the LGBT Resource Center. “It’s now easier for individuals to use whatever name they choose in more academic systems and communications. We hope that many students will choose to update their CIS page with data on gender and sexual identities so that we can better serve everyone. “

Gender and gender identity information

Lemke said giving students a way to share information about their identity will help the university better understand how to recruit, retain and graduate students of diverse identities. The goal is to use this data to improve the resources, programs and policies that support a diverse campus.

Name chosen / preferred

Previously, U employees and students had the option to update their chosen / preferred first names in HR and CIS systems. Now, chosen / preferred names will be automatically updated in multiple systems across campus so students and employees no longer have to ask each department to replace their legal first name in HR systems or the campus directory.

“As we celebrate Pride Month, it is significant that we, as an institution, are making university-wide system changes that more include LGBTQIA + people who live, work and learn here. Making it easier to navigate our institution and making sure we know who the students are is important, ”said Lemke. “At the same time, we know there is still work to be done and we are motivated to continue to make meaningful structural changes with real impacts.”


This press release was produced by the University of Utah. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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Salt lake city government

Can Utah – and its residents – survive the cut in federal COVID-19 unemployment assistance?


Is Utah’s economy and tens of thousands of workers still out of work ready for a change on Saturday that comes with a $ 50 million prize?

Utah Gov. Spencer Cox said his decision to end pandemic-related federal unemployment benefits to some 24,000 Utahns two months ahead of the deadline was the right call amid rising employment from state and robust recovery from the impacts of COVID-19.

But some say they face constant challenges finding work even as the state’s unemployment rate drops to 2.7% and employers advertise 70,000 current job openings. A southern Utah resident recently wrote to the governor describing the hardships he and his wife face as she struggles to find work after losing her job during the pandemic.

“It affects us personally,” said Barry Brumfield of St. George.

The governor gives the reason for the cut

“This is the next natural step in getting the condition and people’s lives back to normal,” Cox said in May when the decision was announced. “I believe in the value of hard work. With the lowest unemployment rate in the country … and many well-paying jobs available today, it makes sense to step away from those added benefits that were never meant to be permanent.

“The market should not be competing with the government for workers. “

He also noted that other “safety net programs” such as assistance with rent, utilities, food and medical bills will still be available.

Stephen Cashon, employment counselor with the Utah Department of Workforce Services, helps Juan Rodriguez apply for a new piece of ID so he can apply for jobs at the department's offices in <a class=Salt Lake City on Tuesday, June 22, 2021.” data-upload-width=”3000″ src=”https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/OhJ–bMQQvUxFVfEX8PQyD_b84M=/0x0:3000×2071/1200×0/filters:focal(0x0:3000×2071):no_upscale()/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/22675676/merlin_2875060.jpg”/>

Stephen Cashon, employment counselor with the Utah Department of Workforce Services, helps Juan Rodriguez apply for a new piece of ID so he can apply for jobs at the department’s offices in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, June 22, 2021.
Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

Cox is one of some two dozen Republican state governors across the United States who have made similar decisions regarding the early end of federal pandemic benefits, saying the added benefit keeps people from wanting to work.

Labor experts say the shortage isn’t just about the $ 300 payment. Some unemployed people have also been reluctant to look for work because of fear of catching the virus. Others have found new occupations rather than returning to their old jobs. And many women, especially working mothers, have had to leave the workforce to care for children.

Following Cox’s announcement, Utah House Minority Leader Brian King, D-Salt Lake City, highlighted these factors while expressing frustration with the governor’s decision to end the benefits. in Utah.

“I mean, it’s the perfect example of a disconnect between people in normal life and people who are struggling to get back on their feet,” King said. “There are many, many people who are worried – afraid – of going back to work. “

What “frustrates me the most,” King said, is that Cox’s decision “reflects this thinking from many across the aisle that people don’t want to work. This is fundamentally wrong.

In early June, the Utah Department of Workforce Services reported that just over 24,700 residents were on some type of unemployment benefit, of which about 12,000 were on traditional benefits plus the federally funded pandemic allowance of $ 300 per week. About 11,000 others were still receiving unemployment insurance benefits under federal extensions also created to mitigate the economic impacts of COVID-19 on American workers. And about 1,200 Utah gig workers – people employed by companies like Uber, Lyft, GrubHub, and others who are classified as contractors who are exempt from typical unemployment benefits – have also received benefits under federal emergency warrants. While federal deadlines for most pandemic-related benefits for the unemployed are due to expire in early September, Cox’s order suspends them 10 weeks ahead of schedule.

And it’s a decision that worries Barry and Stacey Brumfield.

An IT position is available for a job seeker at the Utah Department of Workforce Services in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, June 22, 2021.
Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

The experience of a family

In an interview with Deseret News, Barry Brumfield said he was a longtime Republican who also voted for Cox in the 2020 Utah gubernatorial election, but felt that the governor’s decision to reduce early federal pandemic benefits was a bad call.

“We are very unhappy with this decision,” said Brumfield. “We truly believe in the individual rights and benefits of your own hard labor, but we have come to the point where we feel our hard work has been lost.

“We support the other things that (Cox) does, but that’s our only argument because it affects us personally.”

Brumfield, who is retired, said his wife lost her 13-year job at SkyWest last year as the air travel industry was nearly at a standstill by the pandemic. As Stacey Brumfield continues to look for work, Barry Brumfield said the only offers she had had so far were for minimum wage jobs and at 63 she was unable to start a new job. new career.

In a letter to Cox, Barry Brumfield wrote that his wife’s job search experiences have led her to believe that employers in their area are looking for younger prospects.

“Governor, you may think you are doing what is best for your constituents, but my wife and I are among those who will be greatly affected and hurt by your decision,” Brumfield wrote. “My wife’s job is ‘essential’ so that we can pay the bills and stay out of poverty.

“However, my wife, who worked in the airline industry for 13 years, lost her job due to the pandemic and the drastic decline in airline operations. Now she is unemployed by the state and the federal government, which is vital for us. She is 63 years old and has been looking for a job since the start of the pandemic. His attempts to find a job were unsuccessful due to his age !!! Businesses want someone younger !! said the letter.

The Brumfields aren’t the only Utahns who find themselves both nearing the end of their career and currently looking for a job. As of June 17, the Department of Workforce Services reports 13% of those currently unemployed are 60 years or older.

But the majority – 68% – of those who will be affected by the suspension of federal pandemic benefits are in the “peak working age” category of 25 to 54.

And that’s a statistic that some economists say bodes well for Utah’s overall economy, which continues to outperform the rest of the country.

Utah can absorb lost federal aid

Phil Dean, former director of the state budget and current senior public finance researcher at the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute at the University of Utah, said Utah’s economy is well positioned to absorb the $ 50 million that will be lost in the suspension of federal benefits in the event of a pandemic.

“I just think we’re at a point in the economic recovery where it really makes sense to do it,” Dean said. “Overall, the elimination of the benefits will have a negligible impact on the economy … although some pockets will recover more slowly than others and some households will feel these changes.”

Dean said it’s important to remember that standard UI benefit programs will remain in place and those who fail to find employment will still have access to the standard claims process.

He said that while the programs launched by the federal government to mitigate the worst economic impacts of COVID-19 on individuals and families were the right answer at the time, current circumstances no longer demand the additional benefits.

“The scale of the challenge we had in the midst of the pandemic along with the government’s involvement in restricting the private sector made the initial response entirely appropriate,” Dean said. “And it’s entirely appropriate now to take those enhanced benefits and go back to the traditional programs and system.”

At a virtual Facebook event on June 15, Cox reiterated his belief that his decision to end the pandemic-related benefit and allowance extensions was the right economic call and highlighted efforts to channel additional funds towards worker retraining programs.

Cox said the state has spent $ 16.5 million to help more than 5,700 people get training and find better employment opportunities through the Learn and Work program. He also noted in a press release that the state has committed an additional $ 15 million that will go to Utah training institutions to help those who want to upgrade their skills improve their employment opportunities.

You can find more information on the possibilities for retraining at jobs.utah.gov/jobseeker/career/index.html and uselessah.org/learn-work.


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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City Intl Airport: New Artwork ‘The Canyon’ Awaiting Prize


The artwork lining the walls of the new Salt Lake City International Airport could win an international award, but it is up to the public to help the artwork achieve that goal.

See “The Canyon” at Salt Lake City International Airport

  • Gordon Huether’s “The Canyon” is one of 100 large-scale community works of art from around the world that have been nominated for a CODA Audience Award – an annual award given to “outstanding works that successfully integrate art. in interior, architectural and public spaces, “according to a press release sent to Deseret News.
  • Working on a budget of $ 5 million, Huether and architectural firm HOK sought to create an indoor canyon at the new airport, which opened in September 2020.
  • As the main artist, Huether brought the shapes and ridges of Utah’s canyons to life along the walls of the airport. “The main goal was to bring the outdoors in and give visitors to the state of Utah a sense of belonging,” according to codaworx.com.
  • “The Canyon” is “the central art installation at Salt Lake City International Airport,” the Deseret News reported. As part of the Salt Lake City airport redevelopment program, “Canyon 2.0” will be installed in a hall whose construction will be completed in 2024, according to codaworx.com.
  • “The Canyon” and “Canyon 2.0” won’t be Huether’s only jobs at the airport, however. The “River Tunnel,” another Utah-inspired piece with sound effects of blue light and water, reported the Deseret News. The planned installation date is 2024.

How to vote for ‘The Canyon’

  • Thirty countries submitted hundreds of commissioned art projects for review this year, accounting for $ 477 million in commission fees, according to the press release. The two projects that receive the most votes online will receive the CODA Audience Award.
  • Voting is open now and will run until June 30. People can vote for their favorite work on codaworx.com. The winners will be announced on August 30.
  • Other works of art in the running include painted windows from a redeveloped All Saints Church in Nuremberg, Germany; the “Animalia” exhibition at the Montclair Art Museum in New Jersey; and a 30 foot aluminum arch beacon that sits at the entrance to the Edmonton Police Center in Canada.
  • Toni Sikes, CEO of CODAworx, said in a statement that the People’s Choice contest can get “pretty hot,” with heavy traffic, even causing the website to crash every now and then.
  • “It’s an exciting race to the finish line, the equivalent of the Tour de France in the art world! Sikes said.


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Salt lake city

The University of Utah: Celebrate and Reflect on June


June 18, 2021

On the eve of June 17 of this year, we reflect on the significance of June 19, 1865, a day now commemorated as a federal holiday to mark the end of slavery in the United States. As leaders of the University of Utah, we echo the call to use this new national holiday as a day of reflection and action.

While we recognize this important national legislation as a critical step in our country’s work to address our history of racism, we recognize that there is still a lot of work to be done. Our efforts to dismantle systemic racism require continued attention and a strong commitment to fostering this work on our campus.

To that end, the university fully endorses the June resolution of the Utah higher education system which calls on higher education to continue its commitments and actions to advance fairness, justice and accountability. You can read the full resolution from USHE here.

As you reflect on Juneteenth, we ask that you take the time to learn about the ongoing work of our Equity, Diversity & Inclusion team, as well as what Juneteenth means to members of our University community. Both of these resources are available here:

We look forward to celebrating and commemorating this important day in the years to come with programming and events that mark the significance of this event. We encourage everyone at all levels of the university to do the same.

Truly,

Michael Bon | Acting President

Dan Reed | Senior Vice-President, Academic Affairs

Mary Ann Villarreal | Vice President for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion

Lori McDonald | Vice-President of Student Affairs

Jeff Herring | Human Resources Director


This press release was produced by the University of Utah. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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