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Utah Police: Man Tells 4-Year-Old To Shoot Officers

Police believe a man told his 4-year-old to shoot officers following a dispute over his order at a McDonald’s drive-thru in suburban Salt Lake City

MIDVALE, Utah — Investigators believe a man told his 4-year-old to shoot officers following a dispute over his order at a McDonald’s drive-thru in suburban Salt Lake City on Monday, a announced the police. An officer was able to hit the gun as it was fired, directing the bullet away.

The unidentified man brandished a gun at the Midvale restaurant’s pickup window, demanding that his order be corrected, Unified Police Department spokesman Sgt. Melody Cutler, said . After workers asked her to go to a holding area while they corrected her order, they called the police, she said.

The man did not cooperate and had to be removed from the car, Cutler said. But, as officers took the man into custody, one of them looked back and saw a gun pointed from a rear window, she said. The officer who slid the gun aside as it fired also shouted “kid” at other officers after seeing how young the shooter was, Cutler said.

A witness observed the man tell the 4-year-old, who was in the back seat with a 3-year-old brother, to fire the gun, Cutler said. She declined to elaborate.

Salt Lake County Sheriff Rosie Rivera said it was a sad day for law enforcement and the community.

“The fact that an adult thinks it’s okay to encourage a four-year-old to pull out a gun and shoot the police illustrates how out of control the campaign against the police has gotten,” he said. she declared.

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New bill would force Salt Lake officials to come up with plan for winter homeless shelter

For three winters, governments and nonprofits in Salt Lake County struggled to set up an emergency homeless shelter.

Representative Steve Eliason, R-Sandy offers options in a new bill.

Essentially, HB 440 demands that Salt Lake County government officials come up with a plan for at least one homeless overflow shelter by September 1 – well before the first snow usually falls.

Then this plan will be approved by the Utah Office of Homeless Services. If the proposal does not meet the bureau’s criteria, the state could operate a temporary overflow shelter at a state-owned facility in Salt Lake County.

Alternatively, the bill also allows county homeless resource centers to expand their occupancy until permitted by the fire code.

Eliason said it was essential that unprotected people have options.

“At the bare minimum, I hope this will help get people out of the winter cold to at least somewhere safe and warm where they can spend the night,” Eliason said. “But our goal, of course, is much broader. We need to keep people alive to hopefully get out of homelessness completely.

This winter, Salt Lake-based service providers struggled to open — and keep open — overflow shelters. Just this week the Weigand Center Overflow had to close for lack of staff. The former Ramada Inn, which serves both seniors with medical needs and serves as an emergency shelter for the general public, was also slow to open.

One of the reasons for the difficulty is that it is a difficult to ask for cities to operate a refuge. Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall has made it clear that she thinks the capital had to “take on greater responsibility than other municipalities in the state to provide shelter and services to the state’s homeless population”.

City officials had little to say about Eliason’s proposal at this point.

“We appreciate that Rep. Eliason is always ready to tackle this difficult issue,” said Andrew Wittenberg, the mayor’s spokesman. “We are still working on the details of the bill.”

But Wendy Garvin, who does community outreach through the Unsheltered Utah group, said it was a solid solution. She said the lack of available shelter during the winter is “the biggest problem we have”.

“It’s really frustrating,” Garvin said. “It’s really emotional because the majority of what we’re doing right now is saying to people, ‘I’m really sorry, we don’t have the resources for that.'”

The bill also provides additional funding for cities to mitigate the impacts of homeless shelters.

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We elected the most diverse city council in history. Now what?

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Alejandro Puy, District 2, is sworn in as a member of the Salt Lake City Council, Monday, Jan. 3, 2022.

Last November, when thousands of West Salt Lake voters cast their ballots, I became the first-ever Latino elected to represent Salt Lake City‘s most diverse community. (District 2 is a predominantly Latino district, with a very diverse mix of cultures and nationalities.)

If you’re surprised by this, you wouldn’t be the first, and you’re certainly not the only one. The truth is that critical barriers to entry still exist for minorities seeking to run for office. Only when we understand what barriers exist can we break them down, paving the way for a new generation of diverse representation in Salt Lake City and our state. The incredible time commitment, the expectation of a traditional education in a decidedly non-traditional world, economic demands, trust, and political connections can leave everyday Utahns behind when it comes to representation.

But politics – becoming an elected official and serving your community – shouldn’t be open only to white, educated, wealthy people. We always talk about the lack of diversity in elected and volunteer positions; how valuable voices from different backgrounds are in our government. We desperately need diverse voices, but now this City Council I serve on, in tandem with Salt Lake County and the State of Utah, must do all we can to break down the walls we’ve had to cross to get here, when no one else ever has to fight.

I know the walls first hand. As a recently naturalized immigrant, I had to balance my personal obligations, putting many of them on hiatus, and my desire to serve my community. I was fortunate to have the opportunity to take time off from work from the day I filed my application until the end of our campaign. I am single and I have no children. I worked in politics, made connections, and knew what it took to run in Salt Lake City for years before I decided to file a case. I was lucky, and the system shouldn’t just reward the lucky ones.

But how do you open up the opportunity to others: the single mother on the West Side, who works two jobs, who wants to serve her community to create a better future for her children — how to create a town where she can volunteer for a city council or run for office without it creating an undue burden on his life?

Provide plenty of affordable and accessible childcare opportunities, expand public access to technology like a working computer and webcam that is imperative for joining boardrooms, running and showing up at virtual town halls and meetings constituencies, and making advanced civic education easily accessible to all are good starts. Yet they demand that all of our city councils, our county council, and our state legislature come together to make representation for all of us truly possible for all of us.

I will continue to work to make the application more accessible to everyone. And if you are eager to serve your neighbors as a volunteer or elected official, I hope you will join me in breaking down barriers and creating a stronger, more representative Salt Lake City where all voices are heard and valued.

Alejandro “Ale” Puy | Salt Lake City Council

Alejandro “Ale” Puy represents District 2 on the Salt Lake City Council.

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Utah legislature decisions reflect tensions between local and state government

The Utah State Capitol Building reflects sunlight. Recent legislative decisions targeting education and public health reflect a pattern of disagreement between state and local government. (Decker Westenburg)

Recent decisions by the Utah legislature targeting education and public health reflect a pattern of disagreement between state and local government.

The Utah legislature ended mask mandates in Salt Lake and Summit counties from Jan. 21 to SJR3, despite conflicting views from local leaders. Earlier this month, Governor Spencer Cox signed into law HB183 which suspended the “test to stay” requirement in public schools and said instead that local leaders make the final decision on whether a school district becomes remote.

Cities and local governments are “creatures” of the state and have the legislature’s permission to make decisions, said University of Utah political science professor Dave Buhler.

“But if the legislature doesn’t like the way it wields its power, it can step in and change the rules,” Buhler said.

Buhler has seen many examples throughout his political career of conflicting decisions between the local and state level. As a state senator, he introduced bills to override city council decisions he disliked. But a few years later, as a member of the Salt Lake City Council, he had a different view and thought: “The Legislature leaves us alone, we get it.

He shared an old saying in politics: “Where you stand depends on where you sit.”

Angela Dunn, MD, is executive director of the Salt Lake County Health Department. Dunn acknowledged lawmakers had the power to overturn the county’s mask mandate in a Jan. 20 interview with KSL NewsRadio.

“I think it’s unfortunate given their priority of keeping control at the local level for the COVID response,” she said.

According to Buhler, it is not an excess of state power for the legislature to terminate local public health orders because it has the power to do so.

“It’s not that unusual, but I feel like the legislature over time has become more and more assertive, both about local governments and in its dealings with the state executive. “, did he declare.

Local control “railing”

HB183 sponsor rep Jordan Teuscher, R-South Jordan, said local control is extremely important to him, but as a state legislator, it’s part of his job to put up “guardrails.” around him. SB107, signed into law in March 2021, had already had heads of state approve a district’s request to go remotely. The new law gives additional procedures for districts to follow and requires approval from the Governor, Speaker of the Senate, Speaker of the House, and State Superintendent before logging on.

Teuscher said school districts did not have enough COVID-19 tests to implement testing to stay through the omicron spike when required by law. Heads of state decided to suspend the test to remain in response to these concerns. If the districts want to test to stay, they can, but there is no longer an obligation.

“So in some ways it made local control over the test to stay and then just set the parameters to how someone would request remote days,” he said.

But state involvement in local issues like education and public health is a concern for some.

“I think it’s more political than anything else,” said Steven Sylvester, a political science professor at Utah Valley University.

Parents already have a democracy — school boards and city councils — where they can voice their objections, Sylvester said. “Why does the state need to get involved? »

According to Adam Brown, a BYU political science professor who studies state constitutional politics, there is no doubt that the legislature has the power to set broad policies at the local level. For example, states have independent authority while cities, counties, and school districts only have delegated state powers. States have their own constitutions, cities do not.

But HB183 raised constitutionality issues because it gave the Speaker of the House and the Speaker of the Senate vetoes over certain school district decisions, even though they don’t have the executive power to do so under the constitution of the state.

“The Utah Constitution gives the President and the Speaker of the Senate the power to organize the business of their respective chambers, but not to make binding decisions on their own authority,” Brown said. tweeted. “Changing that would presumably require an amendment to the Utah Constitution, not just a law.”

Attorneys Brent D. Wride and Paul C. Burke called on Governor Cox to veto HB183 in an op-ed in the Salt Lake Tribune and claimed he violated Utah’s separation of powers doctrine by assigning powers executives to legislative officers.

“The constitutional flaw in House Bill 183 is that it violates our state’s constitution by granting legislative officers the power to interpret and apply the law,” they wrote.

In response, Teuscher and prosecution sponsor Senator Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, wrote in another op-ed that Article III of the Utah Constitution requires the legislature to establish and maintain the education system. public: the system will be, and any exceptions that might apply.

National model

The United States and Utah flags flutter in the wind at the Utah State Capitol. Some of Utah’s political science professors view the legislature’s involvement in local issues as a broader pattern both in the state and nationwide. (Emma Gadesky)

Some of Utah’s political science professors view the legislature’s involvement in local issues as a broader pattern both in the state and nationwide.

“Whenever the federal government proposes an action that would force states to follow a particular course, you can expect Utah lawmakers to kick and shout and insist on the virtue of local control,” Brown said.

But in Utah, that faith in local control does not extend to restricting the legislature’s control over cities, counties and school districts, he said: ‘And maybe that is logically inconsistent.”

Josh McCrain, a professor of political science at the University of Utah, said state interference in local issues such as education has no basis in real conservatism. It’s counterintuitive to classic party beliefs like individual choice, freedom and small government, he said.

In 2018, Utahans voted to legalize medical marijuana in Proposition 2. According to the Salt Lake Tribune, state lawmakers replaced the voter-approved proposition with the Cannabis Act. Utah Medical. Democrats have argued that the legislature should not overrule voters who approved the ballot initiative the previous month.

Further overbreadth issues arose after former Governor Gary Herbert signed into law HB3005 in May 2020. The law required the governor to notify certain members of the legislature before declaring a state of emergency. Rep. Merrill Nelson, R-Grantsville, worried the legislature was overstepping the bounds and said it seemed unnecessary and excessive, The Daily Universe reported.

Beyond Utah, state governments have a history of getting involved in social issues at the local level. In North Carolina, McCrain said some cities were willing to have progressive gender bathroom policies, but the Republican state government disagreed.

Utah lawmakers in the House of Representatives and Senate are 78 percent Republican and 22 percent Democrat, but the Salt Lake area is more liberal. (Made with Adobe Illustrator by Emma Gadeski)

North Carolina passed House Bill 2 in 2016, which required people in public buildings to use the bathroom that matches the sex on their birth certificate, regardless of their gender identity. This led to boycotts and cost the state millions in lost tourist revenue.

“It had a massive economic backlash because a ton of industry left the state after that, which of course is something that can happen at any time,” McCrain said.

Utah’s legislature is 78% Republican in 2022, but Salt Lake is more liberal. In 2020, 53.6% of Salt Lake County voted for President Joe Biden in the presidential election, compared to 37.6% statewide.

McCrain said it’s important for Utah to control what happens in Salt Lake City because it’s the “economic powerhouse” of the state.

“We usually see this in contexts where it’s a conservative state government and a city, which are usually very liberal,” he said.

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Why West Valley City is cold-eyed about a renewable energy plan

While all roads lead to clean energy in Utah, some municipalities like West Valley City are leaning towards taking an alternative route to get there.

A 2019 Renewable Energy Bill promised a steady path for local governments to achieve 100% clean energy by 2030. The plan was to push the development of energy infrastructure that would interconnect and power the solar, wind and other carbon-free sources of electricity. directly into the Rocky Mountain Power system.

The Community law on renewable energies, an interlocal agreement born from HB411, began when nearly two dozen Utah cities and counties pledged to achieve the 100% clean energy goal by passing a qualifying resolution, though many other local governments stayed put. touches. The legislation passed with Rep. Stephen Handy, R-Layton, and then the senator. Daniel Hemmert, R-Orem, as sponsors.

However, the implementation of the initiative did not stop there. This multi-year effort required several steps. Currently, advocates are trying to get those eligible cities and counties to sign up for a governance agreement so they can continue in the program.

Membership means cities and counties would pay Phase 1 costs. They would also be part of groups that would work alongside Rocky Mountain Power in designing utility programs.

Until now, 15 local governments joined the interlocal agreement to activate HB411. Salt Lake City, Summit County, Grand County, Moab, Millcreek, Park City and Castle Valley have signed and made additional voluntary payments to help fund these implementation costs, which total approximately $700,000. Alta, Cottonwood Heights, Francis, Holladay, Kearns, Ogden, Salt Lake County and Springdale are also participating in the second stage of the process.

Eight other communities that initially adopted the project have not committed to continue – even though they have been eligible since passing resolutions supporting 100% renewable electricity for their communities by 2030.

West Valley City, the second most populous city in the state, is one of them, along with Bluffdale, Coalville, Emigration Canyon Township, Kamas, Oakley, Orem and West Jordan.

Cost remains a concern

(Chris Samuels | The Salt Lake Tribune) West Valley City Hall, Thursday, February 10, 2022.

After two years of talks, a change of mayor and two council seats — and even with a new deadline that would allow the city to register by May 31 — the city seems unlikely to sign and go. his first Payment of $47,899.22 for stage 1.

A major concern is the impact the switch to clean energy would have on the city’s low-income residents.

City Manager Wayne Pyle recommended that City Council not take the next step to register with the Community Renewable Energy Act. He warned that the city would not be able to control its own destiny once committed to the plan.

“You are a small part of the whole,” he said.

“We are always skeptical and look closely at any new organization before joining,” Pyle said. “My main big concern with Bill 411 is that I have 140,000 residents here, and what they are proposing would include an indefinite financial burden on residents.”

The city council is still discussing the deal. If West Valley City eventually signs on, residents would automatically be included in the clean energy switch. They can opt out by ticking a box on their electricity bill.

New mayor Karen Lang has doubts about the program.

“I don’t think we have enough solid information from Rocky Mountain as to what it would cost residents,” she said. “They just don’t have the details, or they don’t share them. And so I’m not comfortable engaging our residents in anything without all the information.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) West Valley City Mayor Karen Lang at her home on Wednesday, Dec. 8, 2021. She is suspicious of the city’s commitment to an interlocal renewable energy deal.

There is no precise prediction as to the increase in energy prices. A study 2017 found that with this program, “rates would be 9% to 14% higher in 2032 for communities compared to the status quo”. Since then, solar prices decreased by about 25%Utah 100 Communities, the agency administering the program, said on its website.

Go it alone

(Chris Samuels | The Salt Lake Tribune) A UTA bus picks up passengers in West Valley City, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2022.

Advocates of the program argue that this represents a rare opportunity to achieve a key environmental goal. Electricity is one of the biggest sources of carbon emissions nationwide, and this program has the potential to dramatically reduce them and make clean energy accessible to people who can’t afford it. initial investment in solar panels and other energy efficiency tools.

“This program is not coming back. This opportunity is not something there is a political appetite to recreate,” said Sierra Club campaign representative Lindsay Beebe. “It took huge political capital to create this in the first place. And it is currently the only program in Utah, and also in the country, that allows cities to achieve 100% renewable energy by 2030.”

For his part, Pyle doubts that West Valley City is missing an opportunity. The city, he said, is working towards the same goal of 100% clean energy by 2030 on its own.

The city moved to four-day work weeks for its employees in the early 2000s, for example, and converted part of its fleet to hybrid vehicles, including cars for police detectives.

(Chris Samuels | The Salt Lake Tribune) West Valley City Police Department Headquarters, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2022.

“We invested $1 million in federal partnerships for emissions reduction efforts that would result in energy efficiency improvements here at City Hall,” Pyle said. “We did the same thing at the Family Fitness Center. It’s a 100,000 square foot facility. We’ve done it at the Maverik Center, indoors, and we’re working on the exterior, to get the lights to fit into an all-LED structure up there.

The city approves 400 residential rooftop solar projects a year, according to Pyle, and has raised about 4,500 in total. He estimates that this type of action will accelerate and continue over the next eight years.

“We are not perfect. We’re not there yet,” Pyle said. “But we have accelerated and are making great strides in that direction.”

Carmen Valdez, political associate at the environmental nonprofit Heal Utahdiscussed the program with city officials and worked with businesses to encourage them to advocate for HB411.

Valdez said government officials need to know that being part of the interlocal agreement doesn’t mean they’re tied to a program they can’t control.

“What we’re hoping for is that they see that by becoming a member of the committee and the board of directors that come up with this plan and bring it to Rocky Mountain Power,” she said, “you can actually make sure any concerns you have are addressed and include things like making sure there are opportunities for utility expansion in terms of local source power.

Alixel Cabrera is a Report for America member of the corps and writes about the status of communities on the west side of the Salt Lake Valley for the Salt Lake Tribune. Your donation to match our RFA grant helps him keep writing stories like this; please consider making a tax deductible donation of any amount today by clicking here.

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Salt Lake City officer justified in shooting suicidal man, prosecutors say

Navada Escholt shot three officers, police said. He later died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

(Salt Lake City Police Department) Body camera footage shows Officers Benzon (left) and Abel Bromley (right) standing outside Navada Escholt’s apartment on July 20, 2021, moments before Escholt doesn’t shoot officers. Bromley fired back but missed. Escholt later died of a self-inflicted gunshot, police said.

A Salt Lake City officer who shot a suicidal man after the man opened fire on police last July will not face criminal charges, prosecutors said Friday.

Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said officer Abel Bromley reasonably believed — as Utah law stipulates — that he and other officers were in imminent danger after the man , Navada Escholt, shot them.

Bromley returned a single shot, which did not hit Escholt. Escholt, 42, shot himself shortly afterwards, according to Gill’s discovery letter.

Three officers – Bromley and two others, identified only as “Dunn” and “Benzon” – responded to Escholt’s apartment near 1600 West and 800 North on July 20, just after noon. Escholt’s wife had called police to say he was suicidal, had a gun and needed an ambulance, the letter said. She told police that Escholt had been drinking and had not taken her prescription medication.

Officers knocked on the door of Escholt and others in the apartment complex and tried to call Escholt. When no one responded, officers moved about 90 feet from the apartments to the sidewalk, Gill said.

Dunn called Escholt’s wife and asked if she could try to talk to Escholt. He said the officers did not want to force their way inside and escalate the situation.

During that phone call, Escholt opened his front door and fired a single shot at officers who took cover. Bromley fought back from behind a tree. Dunn and Benzon pulled up behind a truck in a neighbor’s driveway.

Escholt fired about 20 minutes after officers arrived. Shortly after that first volley of fire, Escholt apparently shot himself in his apartment.

Officers learned he later died after sending a police robot into the house and finding Escholt in a bedroom.

Escholt had been charged earlier in the day with witness tampering and retaliation. He was being investigated for aggravated assault and allegedly sent threatening messages on Facebook to someone involved in the case. His wife told investigators he had recently lost his job and was suffering from a “nervous breakdown”.

Gill praised the “incredible restraint” of the officers, noting that they tried to contact Escholt several times and kept their distance from the apartment to buy time and defuse the difficult scene. Gill said they had to deal with multiple concerns at once – the cares of the caller, an armed person in mental health crisis and an apartment complex with “people and thin walls”.

Gill said officials could do more to ensure people with mental health needs receive adequate treatment, and that police could receive more training for situations involving people going through such crises.

“But unfortunately tragedy happens because sometimes the people who are hurting can also escalate into a really violent situation, and then we have to respond as law enforcement to protect everyone else as well,” Gill said.

(Paighten Harkins | The Salt Lake Tribune) Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill reviews body camera footage during a news conference on Feb. 11, 2022. Gill ruled that an SLCPD officer was legally justified in shooting Navada Escholt after Escholt shot officers on July 20, 2021.

All three agents from Salt Lake City were certified in crisis intervention.

A Salt Lake Tribune analysis of a decade of police shooting data found that more than 40% of police shootings in the state involved someone in mental health crisis. More than half of those cases involved someone with a gun, and 80% of those cases involved someone who was suicidal.

The shooting marked the 17th in Utah in 2021. Police shot 31 people last year, surpassing the previous record of 30 police shootings, which was set in 2018 and tied in 2020. Records show more more officers have been shot at least a year than in recent history.

Editor’s note If you or people you know are at risk of self-harm, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides 24-hour assistance at 1-800-273-8255.

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Gun control: Utah bill declares state has ultimate power over gun laws

After two years of failed attempts, a Utah bill that clarifies only the state — not cities, counties or other local entities — can enact gun regulations has cleared a major legislative hurdle Thursday.

The Utah Senate voted 20-5 to approve SB115, with Democrats voting against. It is now before the House for consideration – but the Senate was an obstacle. Previous versions of the bill had not survived in years past.

Once approved, the bill would close a loophole in state law that allowed Salt Lake County to require vendors at gun shows at county facilities to conduct background checks. track record since the beginning of 2020.

In 2020, the proposal was approved by the House in a party-line vote, but stalled in the Senate after Senate leaders refused to prioritize it and a host of others. gun-related bills. Another version of the bill also died in 2021 after being approved by the House, but never heard in the Senate.

The bill’s sponsors, Sen. Chris Wilson, R-Logan, and Rep. Cory Maloy, R-Lehi, said they are pushing SB115 to preserve Utahns’ freedoms and Second Amendment rights without “unnecessary interference.” of the government”.

“In recent years, local governments have attempted to exploit loopholes in state law to regulate guns at conventions, not acting in the best interests of all Utahns,” Wilson told the Senate on Tuesday, in a first vote.

“The purpose of this bill is to clarify and protect citizens from local firearms regulations that contradict state law.”

Wilson said current Utah law already prohibits cities and counties from passing gun regulations regarding the ownership, possession, transfer or transportation of a firearm.

“Local governments are prohibited from directly regulating firearms,” ​​Wilson said. “This bill makes it clear that local governments do not have the authority to regulate firearms.”

The bill declares that the Utah Legislature “occupies the entire realm of state firearms regulation” and specifies that state and local government entities – including colleges, universities, public schools, cities, counties, and other local entities — “may not adopt or enforce a directive that violates” state authority over gun regulation.

If a local government attempts to regulate guns, the bill would allow local government entities to be sued and “ensures that the local government is accountable,” Wilson said.

Democrats, including Sen. Derek Kitchen, D-Salt Lake City, pushed back against the bill, calling it “worrying” and a “blanket ban.” Kitchen expressed concern that it would prohibit cities from regulating “where a gun store, for example, can be located.”

“I think that’s pretty clear excess on the part of the state,” Kitchen said.

Senator Kathleen Riebe, D-Cottonwood Heights, said she was “shocked” to learn that rural counties, including Duchesne and Millard counties, have the highest rates of gun violence in the state. . She also pointed to a shooting last month on a West Valley City sidewalk that killed two Hunter High School freshman football players and hospitalized a sophomore football player.

“I think we need to increase our accountability, not decrease it,” Riebe said.

While some Democratic lawmakers questioned whether the bill would impact the state’s suicide rate, Republicans pushed back, arguing that a bill clarifying the state’s regulatory authority firearms would not have an impact on suicide rates.

“The fact is, most gun violence in the state of Utah is self-harm,” said Sen. Daniel Thatcher, of R-West Valley City. “It’s a tragic fact and something we’ve been working on and something we’ve addressed in other bills. This bill will have no impact on the suicide rate in the state of Utah.

SB115 is now going home, where previous versions have sailed with wide support.

Contributor: Ashley Imlay

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Details released after chase that injured 1 officer, hit 3 police cruisers before ending in Salt Lake City

Officers from Unified PD and Salt Lake City Police following a winding chase that began in Millcreek and ended at SLC late Saturday night. Photo: Gephardt Daily/Patrick Benedict

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, Jan. 30, 2022 (Gephardt Daily) — A man faces nine felony charges after police say he responded to a traffic stop by pressing his foot on the gas pedal, forcing the driver to leave her seat, and the start of a winding police chase that left one officer injured and three police cars damaged.

The lawsuit, which reportedly began 300 East and 3900 South, Millcreekfinished at 133 Mead Ave. (about 1000 south), Salt Lake City, with suspect Zachary L. Ommundson attempting to flee on foot, but being taken into custody, according to his probable cause statement.

The initial traffic stop was made for an inoperable taillight, says a statement filed by an officer with the Salt Lake County Sheriff’s Office.

“The vehicle was occupied by a female driver, the subject in the center front seat, and a passenger in the front passenger seat,” the report said. “Your depositor has asked the driver to turn off the vehicle and has collected identifying information. A records check has been performed
on the three individuals and the subject was found to have multiple statewide warrants.

Unified PD and Salt Lake City Police officers following a chase that began at 300 East 3900 South in Millcreek and ended on Mead Ave. in Salt Lake City. Photo: Gephardt Daily/Patrick Benedict

The male suspect on the passenger side was asked to step out and he did. Ommundson, 37, who was seated in the center, was ordered out next.

“Subject turned on the vehicle, put the vehicle into gear, and pushed his foot on the accelerator,” the statement read. “A UPD officer ordered the subject to stop and attempted to remove the subject from the vehicle, but was struck by the vehicle, causing a lower leg injury.

“The driver was abducted by the subject and later stated that she was forced out of the driver’s seat by the subject and held against her will.”

The chase began.

“Your filer had turned on his emergency lights and sirens and the subject did not stop,” the statement continued. “During the chase, the subject struck your affiant’s vehicle and continued to flee. Subject drove into oncoming traffic, through a barrier and eventually lost control at 980 S. 160 West. Subject overturned vehicle in SLCPD officerfrom the vehicle, then attempted to flee again, but was cornered and taken into custody.

Photo: Gephardt Daily/Patrick Benedict

A police search revealed contraband.

“There was a tomahawk in the driver’s seat and the subject was a restricted person. Subject was discovered to have a positive methamphetamine field test on him. »

Ommundson faces initial charges of:

  • Aggravated kidnapping, a first degree felony
  • Aggravated theft, takes usable vehicle, first degree felony
  • Three counts of Assaulting a Peace Officer/Military with Weapon or Force, a Second Degree Felony
  • Failure to respond to officer’s stop signal, with death/injury, a third degree felony
  • Failure to stop when ordered by police, a third degree felony
  • Possession of a Schedule ll/lll/analogue controlled substance, a third degree felony
  • Possession of a dangerous weapon by a restricted person, a third degree felony
  • Driving with a denied license, a class C misdemeanor
  • Driving on the left side of the road when prohibited, an offense

Because Ommundson’s actions demonstrated he was a flight risk, a judge granted the officer’s request that the suspect be held in the Salt Lake County Jail without bond.

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Utah adds more than 39,000 new COVID-19 cases and 28 deaths

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – The Utah Department of Health is reporting 39,882 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday, Jan. 18, and 28 new deaths since Friday.

Case

With 39,882 new cases of COVID-19 reported, the total number of cases in Utah reached 790,216.

Of today’s new cases, 8,490 are school-aged children. The UDOH reports 2,556 cases in children aged 5 to 10, 1,875 cases in children aged 11 to 13, and 4,059 cases in children aged 14 to 17.

Vaccines

A total of 4,723,232 doses of vaccine have been administered in Utah.

This is an increase of 27,470 doses since Friday.

Vaccinated vs. unvaccinated risk ratio

Over the past 28 days, unvaccinated people are 13.3 times more likely to die from COVID-19, 6.1 times more likely to be hospitalized due to COVID-19, and 2.3 times more risks of testing positive for COVID-19 than vaccinated people.

As of February 1, 2021, unvaccinated people have a 6.8 times greater risk of dying from COVID-19, a 4.9 times greater risk of being hospitalized due to COVID-19, and a 1.6 times higher of testing positive for COVID-19 than vaccinated people.

Laboratory tests

Utah Department of Health lab reports show 4,611,947 people have been tested. This is an increase of 78,112 since Friday.

The UDOH reports a total of 8,484,276 total tests, an increase of 151,176 tests since Friday.

Tendencies

The 7-day rolling average for positive tests is 10,652 per day.

The 7-day rolling average of “people over people” positivity percentage is 41.3%. The 7-day moving average of the percentage of positivity of “tests on tests” is 29%.

Hospitalizations

There are 681 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19. The total number of hospitalizations since the start of the epidemic is 29,496.

Death

There are 3,979 total deaths, 28 more than Friday.

  1. Male, over 85, resident of Salt Lake County, not hospitalized at time of death
  2. Male, 25-44, Salt Lake County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  3. Male, 45-64, Utah County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  4. Male, 45-64, Salt Lake County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  5. Male, 45-64, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  6. Female, age 85+, resident of Davis County, hospitalized at time of death
  7. Female, 45-64, resident of Weber County, hospitalized at time of death
  8. Male, 65-84, Utah County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  9. Male, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  10. Male, 65-84, resident of Salt Lake County, not hospitalized at time of death
  11. Male, 65-84, resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  12. Male, over 85, resident of Washington County, hospitalized at time of death
  13. Female, 65-84, resident of Weber County, resident of a long-term care facility
  14. Male, 85+, Cache County resident, not hospitalized at time of death
  15. Male, over 85, resident of Sevier County. not hospitalized at time of death
  16. Female, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  17. Female, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  18. Male, 45-64, Davis County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  19. Female, age 85+, resident of Washington County, hospitalized at time of death
  20. Male, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  21. Female, 65-84, resident of Uintah County, hospitalized at time of death
  22. Male, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  23. Male, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County, not hospitalized at time of death
  24. Male, 65-84, Utah County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  25. Male, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County. hospitalized at time of death
  26. Male, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  27. Male, 65-84, Utah County resident, not hospitalized at time of death
  28. Female, 65-84, resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death

Today vs Wednesday

Today Friday
Total Utahns Testing Positive 790 216 750,334
Total number of people tested 4,611,947 4,533,835
Utah COVID-19 Deaths 3,979 3,951
Vaccines administered 4,723,232 4,695,762
Utahns currently hospitalized with COVID-19 681 672
Total hospitalizations 29,496 29,029
Courtesy of UDOH
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Salt lake city government

Work begins on the Astra Tower, soon to be the tallest skyscraper in downtown Salt Lake City

Undeterred by the resurgence of the pandemic, developers in Boston are continuing to build a new luxury residential building on State Street, which is expected to be Salt Lake City’s tallest skyscraper.

Astra Tower will rise 450 feet tall at its highest point and bring approximately 372 upscale apartments spread across 40 floors in the city’s growing downtown core, according to delighted backers from Kensington Investment Company, based in Boston, which kicked off Wednesday with a short groundbreaking ceremony.

The new tower launched at 200 S. State Street – the former site of a Carl Jr. fast food restaurant and an adjacent surface parking lot – is expected to be completed by October 2024.

(Courtesy of Kensington Investment Company, via Jacobsen Construction) A rendered view looking west along the 200 South of the Astra Tower, a new 372-unit luxury apartment complex under construction at 200 S. State Street which will be Utah’s tallest building, when completed in fall 2024.

The tower will be built to some of the highest environmental standards in the world and will join at least half a dozen new high-rise office and residential buildings under construction or under construction in the Utah capital, in the midst of ‘an unprecedented increase in development along the Wasatch front. .

We took a dream and today we turn it into reality, ”said Ed Lewis, CEO of the private company. The Astra Tower has faced “several obstacles” over the past three years – even taunts that the project was “silly or a little bit crazy,” Lewis said, “and maybe they’re right.”

“Either way, Utah is our home. Either way, we’re not going, ”Lewis told several dozen people who gathered in advance at the Gallivan Center. Salt Lake City is fast becoming a world class city, and I think the tower will be the future of apartment living in Utah.

Astra Tower was designed by HKS, a Dallas-based architectural firm with offices in Salt Lake City, looks like The Kensington, an apartment tower built by the same developer in Boston in 2013.

Salt Lake City’s latest luxury studio skyscraper, one- and two-bedroom apartments – likely to reach the city’s upper echelons with monthly rents – will be capped by two floors of exclusive penthouses, serviced by a dedicated high speed elevator.

Other top-notch Astra Tower amenities will be spread over three separate floors, according to plans approved at City Hall, and will include a rooftop swimming pool, clubhouse, park, sky lounge and a terrace with panoramic view.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) A groundbreaking ceremony takes place on Wednesday, January 12, 2022 for Astra Tower, a 372-unit luxury residential tower that will rise to 200 S. State Street in Salt Lake City. It will be Utah’s tallest building, built to the city’s new sustainability standards, and is slated to open in fall 2024.

Joined by other city and state officials, Salt Lake City Councilor Ana Valdemoros praised the company’s decision to build to what’s known as LEED Gold, a certified sustainability approach. by the US Green Building Council which, among other things, carbon footprint.

Valdemoros said the skyscraper project was emblematic of the city center‘s “inevitable” new direction in town planning, towards denser housing and vertical construction. Astra, she said, put forward a long-held vision for “a walkable downtown with taller buildings and busier streets filled with new residents.”

And at its intended height, Astra is expected to overtake the Wells Fargo Center (422 feet) and the LDS Church Office Building (420 feet) as the tallest building in town. It joins the newly constructed tower called 95 State Street at City Creek, a 395-foot office building at 100 South and State State, west of the downtown Harmon grocery store.

Just two blocks away, the new 700-room Hyatt Regency Salt Lake City – the new Salt Lake County Convention Center hotel in West Temple and 200 South – reached its full height of 375 feet in November and is slated to open. its doors in the fall of 2022.

Renderings indicate that Salt Lake City’s last skyscraper – in recent years referred to as the Kensington Tower until Wednesday’s official name change to Astra Tower – will have a sleek rectangular glass-clad exterior and a two-story lobby overlooking State Street.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) A piece of cleared land is pictured in May 2021, as it prepares for the new Astra Tower, a 372-unit luxury residential tower that will rise to 200 S. State Street in Salt Lake City. A groundbreaking ceremony on Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2021, marked the debut of Utah’s tallest building, built to the city’s new sustainability standards and is slated to open in fall 2024.

Salt Lake City is on the rise: economically, socially, statistically,” said Dee Brewer, who heads the Downtown Alliance of the Salt Lake Chamber. He called the Astra Tower “a remarkable indication of this ascent”.

Boosters for Utah said the Astra Tower will increase the city’s ability to attract new professionals, businesses and investors to Utah.

“It tells them that we have arrived as a city,” said Stephanie Frohman, senior vice president of the Economic Development Corporation of Utah. “We not only have the lifestyle, the cultural and recreational opportunities that their talent seeks, but also the residential. “

Astra is also at least the sixth new skyscraper currently under construction in downtown Salt Lake City in the past three years – and one of four rising along a three-block stretch. of State Street.

Other State Street projects include the 24-story luxury apartment tower called Liberty Sky at 151 S. State Street; 95 State at City Creek, built by City Creek Reserve, a developmental arm of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; and a two-tower residential project at 255 S. State by Chicago-based developer Brinshore, with financial support from the city’s redevelopment agency and other government agencies.

When completed, the Astra Tower will also mark a milestone in luxury high-rise life for tenants and is part of a larger apartment building boom.

(Francisco Kjolseth | Tribune file photo) Salt Lake City’s skyline is changing rapidly, with at least six skyscrapers soaring and several large multi-story apartment and office complexes under construction along its main streets.

Astra’s living units are likely to compete with nearby Liberty Sky with its 272 high-end apartments and amenities, completed this year by Boyer Co. and Cowboy Partners, both located in Utah. Liberty Sky Studios are currently priced between $ 1,499 and $ 2,199 per month.

Texas-based developer Hines is also suing a new 31-story residential skyscraper a few blocks at 150 S. Main, on the site of the historic Utah Theater, ready for demolition. This 392-foot tower – called Main Street Apartments and backed by Hines, based in Houston and the city’s GDR – will feature 400 new units including 40 more affordable, 355 at market rates and five penthouses, as well as a sky lounge, d other characteristic luxuries and an adjoining pocket park.

A development company in New York, The Domain Cos., Also announced plans for its own residential skyscraper with 342 apartments at 370 S. West Temple, two blocks east of Pioneer Park, and proposed to make 26 floors.

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Salt lake city

Spy Hop tackles vaccine hesitation + SLC winter shelter now open

Happy Wednesday, Salt Lake City! Let’s start this day off on the right foot. Here is everything happening in the city today.


First of all, the weather forecast for the day:

Foggy sun. High: 44 Low: 26.


Here are the top 3 stories in Salt Lake City today:

  1. the CDC Foundation wants to reach a younger audience with youth-focused, digitally native and creative content. Thus, the local association, Spy Hop – a digital media arts center for young people – will be receive funds from the foundation use the power of art to activate media projects on the topic of vaccine reluctance. The association will collaborate with the Salt Lake County Department of Healtht on his Vax2theMax 2.0 project. (ABC 4)
  2. Finally, a winter hideaway in Salt Lake City is open for use and will be house 35 people not sheltered. While still feeling the effects of a labor shortage that has significantly delayed the opening of several seasonal shelters, county and state employees are volunteering to no longer delay opening. from this refuge. Other shelters are planned, but manage organizations like The road home are still in the process of overcoming the hurdle of their full staffing. (Salt Lake Tribune)
  3. the Salt Lake County Council has the power to repeal the Ministry of Health’s most recent mask mandate, and they already did. But in the wake of the hugely contagious omicron variant, with a record number of new cases every day, the County council won’t repeal mask mandate this time. City Councilor Aimee Winder Newton spoke in favor of the term, marking a change from her previous position. (KSL Newsradio)

From our sponsor:

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Today in Salt Lake City:

  • Learn it the basics of pointillism and how to paint a winter scene from the Wasatch Range surrounded by a spectrum of blue dots in this DIY workshop from Elizabeth walsh. All equipment is provided, and beginners are welcome! Presented by Craft Lake City at Valley Fair Mall. (6:00 p.m.)
  • Attend a cooking class with Butte Rouge garden course series Cooking with plants for a healthier U. “This series of courses aims to give individuals the tools and the confidence to redefine healthy cooking while striving for delight!” Participants will enjoy a meal after the cooking demonstration. (6:00 p.m.)
  • See Phantom like you might never have imagined? Desert Star Playhouse brings its signature hilarious twist to the classic show in its musical parody of the Phantom of the Opera. (7:00 p.m.)
  • the Utah Jazz take on the Cleveland Cavaliers tonight for a home game in Salt Lake City at Vivid arena. From the arena: “Masks are mandatory and all guests aged 12 and over must show complete proof of vaccination against COVID-19 OR a qualified negative COVID-19 test performed within 72 hours of the event to access at the arena. “(7:00 p.m.)

From my notebook:

  • “If you went out along the Wasatch facade, you’ve probably seen the telltale haze. Yes, high pressure means inversion conditions at least mid-week, causing a drop in air quality. Carpool or use public transport whether you can.” (United States National Meteorological Service Salt Lake City Utah)
  • “Even superheroes have to wear face masks. Salt Lake County’s New Mask Mandate, masks, worn correctly, will now be compulsory in Discovery Gateway Children’s Museum, regardless of vaccination status. “(Discovery Gateway Children’s Museum)
  • UMOCA is looking for a proactive autodidact with fundraising, grant development and management experience to hold the position of Grants and Strategic Funding Manager. “(Utah Museum of Contemporary Art)
  • “Submissions are now open for our Folk Arts Apprenticeship Scholarships, which aim to enable qualified people to study with traditional master artists of Utah’s Ethnic, Indigenous, Rural, and Professional Communities who demonstrate a commitment impart cultural knowledge.⁠ “(Utah Arts and Museums)

Do you like the daily life of Salt Lake City? Here are all the ways to get more involved:


Finally, looking for some inspiration for your social life during the winter season? You may want to check out these 8 great ideas for winter dates in Utah Utah Stories. OK, now you are up to date and ready to start Wednesday off on the right foot! See you tomorrow morning for your next update.

Joseph peterson

About me: Joseph is a writer and marketing communications strategist, graduating in Mass Communications and Public Relations from the University of Utah. He is passionate about city life, public libraries, national parks and promoting events that strengthen community.

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Utah economy

Salt Lake City to be a finalist to host the 2024 Republican National Convention

Downtown Salt Lake City is pictured on October 12, 2020. Salt Lake City is said to be one of the finalists to host the 2024 Republican National Convention. (Steve Griffin, Deseret News)

Estimated reading time: 2-3 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah is reportedly among the finalists to host the 2024 Republican National Convention.

Politico reported on Friday that Salt Lake City was on the party’s shortlist, along with Milwaukee, Nashville and Pittsburgh, citing a source familiar with the research process. Houston, Las Vegas, San Antonio and Kansas City, Missouri have reportedly been removed from consideration for the event.

The 2024 convention is where party members will select their candidate for the next presidential election. Among the remaining host candidates, Salt Lake City and Nashville, the outlet points out, are in strong Republican stronghold states, while Milwaukee and Pittsburgh are located in recent swing states.

Milwaukee and Nashville are also in the running to host the 2024 Democratic National Convention.

Utah Republican Party officials said in October they would submit a bid to host the event, after failing to host the 2012 and 2016 events. They coordinated the bid effort with Visit Salt Lake, the organization that promotes tourism in Salt Lake County.

Utah Republican Party Chairman Carson Jorgensen told KSL.com at the time that he believed hosting the event could generate as much as $ 200 million for the economy of the State, and cited the city’s growth as the reason he thinks the city could be selected this time around. .

The new Salt Lake City International Airport, which has the capacity to handle more people, opened in 2020. The Concourse A-East construction project to add 22 more gates is expected to be completed in 2024.

The Hyatt Regency Convention Center Hotel, an addition to the Salt Palace Convention Center, is also expected to open at the end of 2022. It is expected to add 700 new hotel rooms and 60,000 square feet of additional meeting space downtown .

“The party supports this and the state would really like to see it here,” Jorgensen said. “I think Utah has a very good chance of doing this.”

It is not known when the Republican Party will announce its selection for the 2024 event. However, Politico reports that the Republican National Committee will be in Salt Lake City next month for its annual winter meeting.

More stories that might interest you

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Salt lake city

Winter weather advisory issued as wind and snow return to Utah


Several inches of fresh snow blanketed the Salt Lake Valley on December 15, 2021. A storm affecting Utah mostly on Tuesday and Wednesday is expected to provide a few more inches in the county, along with several more in northern Utah and up. 2 feet in the mountains. (Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News)

Estimated reading time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY – 2022 picks up where 2021 left off, at least in northern Utah.

The national meteorological service published winter weather advisory Tuesday, which cover the mountainous areas of northern Utah, where up to 2 extra feet of snow is expected through Thursday. Several inches of snow are also expected in the backcountry communities of Cache Valley and Wasatch, while the Wasatch front is also expected to receive snow.

The return of the snow

The storm system is heading west but does not cover the entire state as some storms in December did. Meteorological service hydrologists told KSL.com last week that a new system over the Pacific Ocean was emerging, changing patterns of storms entering the west.

KSL meteorologist Kristen Van Dyke said parts of northern Utah are expected to receive snow showers on Tuesday. The storm is expected to plunge into Salt Lake County in the evening, she said.

“Another system comes in (Wednesday) and may bring more snow accumulated during the morning hours (Wednesday) continuing into the afternoon and maybe even (Wednesday) at night,” she said. “For the Wasatch front, we might look at a mix of rain and snow. And then Thursday we’ll see things calm down a bit, once we’re done Thursday morning.”

Most of the snow is expected in the mountains for the duration of the storm system. Weather advisories call for 1 to 2 feet of snow in the Wasatch and Western Uinta mountains. This includes Alta, Brighton, Logan Summit, Mantua and the Mirror Lake Highway.

The warning for these zones went into effect early Tuesday and will remain in effect until 5 a.m. Thursday.

Winter driving conditions can be expected, including snow-covered roads and significantly reduced visibility, “the weather service wrote in the alert.” Areas of blowing snow can sometimes reduce visibility to near zero.

Forecast storms end with a productive December for these high elevation areas. For example, the Alta weather service station collected over 8 1/2 feet of fresh snow last month. Wasatch Mountain’s snowpack fell from about a third of normal in early December to a range of 107% to 117% of normal on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, an advisory in the Cache Valley and Wasatch backcountry, such as Garden City, Heber City, Huntsville, Logan, Park City, Smithfield and Woodruff, says 4 to 8 inches of snow through Thursday morning, with higher averages closer to Huntsville and the Ogden Valley.

The national meteorological service also tweeted a snow model on Tuesday morningg showing that Logan could end up with up to 1 foot of snow by Thursday, while Park City could also receive more than 1 foot of snow. Winter driving conditions, including snow-covered roads and poor visibility, are sometimes expected Tuesday and Wednesday in northern Utah, according to the weather service.

The agency’s model lists 1-8 inches of snow from Brigham City to Provo through Thursday, with the highest totals expected in and around Ogden, Davis County and Provo. Snow is expected in parts of central Utah, but most of the snow is concentrated in the northern part of the state.

the Utah Department of Transportation issued road weather alert for most parts of the state from the northern Parleys summit on Tuesday. The agency urges drivers to slow down and use caution, especially on high-altitude roads.

“(The) biggest impacts will be the heavier snow on the roads of the Sardine and Logan peaks during the morning drive, as well as the light snow on the roads of northern Utah,” UDOT wrote in the alert Tuesday.

Another alert is expected to be issued on Wednesday.

Windy weather

Wind is another component of the forecast for the next few days. The weather service has issued strong wind warnings and watches for parts of southwestern Wyoming, including Flaming Gorge; however, strong gusts are also expected in parts of Utah.

Gusts of up to 45 mph and more are expected in northeast Utah, including Randolph. Wind gusts are also expected to exceed 30 mph in areas like Park City and Duchesne between Tuesday morning and Wednesday evening.

Van Dyke said there would be strong gusts along the Wasatch front, but far from possibilities in northeast Utah and southwest Wyoming.

“We will see gusts of wind along the Wasatch front, but areas (northeast of Utah) could see gusts above 55 and 60 mph while (the Wasatch front) stays more in the 25 range. at 30 mph most of the day, “she said.

A full seven-day forecast for parts of Utah is available from the KSL Weather Center.

More stories that might interest you



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Salt lake city government

Robert Gehrke looked at Utah’s future for 2022, here’s what he saw


From redistribution to Mitt Romney and the Real Housewives, Robert Gehrke offers his annual forecast for 2022.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Robert Gehrke.

Like every year around this time, I spent the last weekend lighting incense and sage, reading tea leaves, consulting maps, and shaking a magic eight ball.

I even killed a chicken to try to guess what to expect in Utah in 2022.

OKAY. It was a chicken sandwich, and I ate it. The point is, I am committed to helping each of you prepare for what lies ahead in the coming year.

First, a recap of my predictions for 2021, in which it was predicted that former President Donald Trump would spend the year ranting, expressing grievances and generally slamming (it’s nailed down); the legislature would ignore the Utah Independent Redistricting Commission and Gerrymander Salt Lake County (of course); President Joe Biden would restore Utah’s national monuments and the state would go on (yes); and selfish vaccine deniers would prolong the pandemic (and, boy, have they ever done that!).

I also predicted that Senator Mitt Romney would be key if Congress is to do something (see also: the Infrastructure Bill); the legislature would avoid large-scale tax reform, Rep. Burgess Owens would say something bizarre and embarrassing (a giveaway, really).

There were a few hiccups. I didn’t think Democrats could win both Georgia Senate elections and hope no one wasted too much money on my prediction that the Utah Jazz would advance to the Western Conference Finals (they lost in the semi-finals).

Still, a decent record proving that I am listening more and more to the universe. So as long as the chips in my vaccines don’t cause too much interference, here’s what’s in store for 2022.

From the “Hope I’m Wrong” files, Senator Mike Lee will be re-elected.

I’ve said before that Ally Isom and former Rep. Becky Edwards are good candidates and would be a big improvement over Lee, but Lee is popular with the fundamentalist Republican wing and beating him will be very difficult, especially s ‘they split the dissenting vote. . I don’t see any challenger giving up at this point.

On paper, it’s safe to say that anti-Trump independent challenger Evan McMullin has a shot at beating Lee, but it feels a bit like hitting a hole in a blindfold. He will fight well, but despite clear differences between Lee and McMullin, he will fail to convince Democrats who see it as a trade of Lee for another Republican.

In the aftermath of the redistribution, Republicans will win the US House, but I think Democrats barely manage to keep the Senate – if you consider what they have now, it’s the Senate’s “hold”. The divided Congress means nothing will be done and Biden’s presidency will be mostly inconsequential.

Better Boundaries continue to send emails asking for money for a possible lawsuit challenging the Legislative Redistribution, but my magic ball doesn’t predict that they actually pull the trigger. The legislature will not empty the independent commission, at least not right away. They have nine years to do so and voters have short memories. The Utah Democrats will lose two House seats within the redesigned boundaries.

Right-wing activists pushing a voting initiative with a host of terrible ideas to make voting more difficult – restrict registration, end postal and early voting and revert to hand-marked paper ballots – don’t will not even come close to doing it on the ballot. The Legislative Assembly’s audit of Utah’s voting system will come back perfectly, proving that state elections are up. It won’t matter for the aforementioned crowd of tin foil hats. And, despite positive reviews from voters, ranked voting will not be extended (at Mike Lee’s request).

• Utah will experience another severe drought, which is evident since we have experienced drought for the past 25 years. Lakes and reservoirs will remain low and large fires will burn. But some initial, late action will be taken in water conservation.

• In the face of a host of lost rights for transgender Utahns, critical racial theory and anti-government bills, Utah Jazz owner Ryan Smith and the recently formed Silicon Slopes Political Action Committee will be pushed. to take a leading role as the voice of reason and perhaps provide a little cover for Governor Spencer Cox to push back the legislature.

• One of Salt Lake City‘s real housewives will file for divorce, but she won’t be the one you expect!

• In the sports world, The University of Utah will shock Ohio State in THE Rose Bowl; this time, the Jazz will really make the final of the Western Conference; Salt Lake City will attempt to host the 2030 Olympic Winter Games; and my Detroit Lions will make the playoffs next season (no, really).

• This one’s more of a wish than a prediction, but we’ll finally put COVID-19 in our rearview mirrors (mostly) and we can stop worrying about what anti-vaxxers or anti-maskers or merchants think. conspiracy. We can return to a semblance of pre-pandemic life, filled with well-deserved peace and prosperity.

Happy 2022!


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Salt lake city

Man arrested for attempted hijacking at car wash


SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4– On Friday, December 24, Salt Lake City police arrested a 28-year-old man after crashing a stolen SUV, running away from officers and trying to hijack a person in a car.

SLCPD officers say around 7:13 a.m. they received a call regarding a possible impaired driver in the 800 South and 1000 West area. It was reported that the suspect’s vehicle was traveling at high speed across the Jordan River. They also reported that at some point the vehicle passed through oncoming traffic.

As officers entered the area to search for the suspect’s vehicle, the driver, at high speed, crashed into a parked car near the intersection of Indiana Avenue and Montgomery Street. A witness reported that the driver got out of the vehicle and walked west.

When an SLCPD sergeant located the suspect walking on Redwood Road near 1000 West, the suspect immediately ran to a nearby car wash. Officers said the suspect attempted to steal someone’s vehicle from inside the car wash parking lot.

Due to the suspect’s jacket, the deployment of an officer’s Taser did not work. An SLCPD officer and sergeant managed to prevent the suspect from escaping and took him into custody without further incident.

During the investigation, officers learned that the vehicle the suspect was driving was reported stolen in Salt Lake City. Inside the stolen vehicle, officers found several other items, including a birth certificate, passport, several cell phones, and a vehicle registration card, all of which appear to be suspected theft.

Officers also determined that the suspect had at least one active felony arrest warrant at the time of his arrest.

The suspect’s name will not be released until he is incarcerated in the Salt Lake County Metropolitan Jail.

The victim of the attempted carjacking was not injured.

No additional information is available for publication.


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Salt lake city

Utah adds more than 1.4,000 new COVID-19 cases, 11 deaths amid omicron outbreak on Wednesday


SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – The Utah Department of Health is reporting 1,406 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, December 22, and 11 new deaths since yesterday.

Here is the detail of the new cases:

Case

With 1,406 new cases of COVID-19 reported, the total number of cases in Utah has reached 622,414.

Of today’s new cases, 167 are school-aged children. The UDOH reports 72 cases in children aged 5 to 10 years, 44 cases in children aged 11 to 13 years and 51 cases in children aged 14 to 17 years.

Vaccines

A total of 4,465,357 doses of vaccine have been administered in Utah.

This is an increase of 16,694 doses since yesterday.

Vaccinated vs unvaccinated risk ratio

In the past 28 days, unvaccinated people are 16.4 times more likely to die from COVID-19, 9.6 times more likely to be hospitalized from COVID-19, and 3.7 times more likely to risk of testing positive for COVID-19 than vaccinated people.

As of February 1, 2021, unvaccinated people are 6.8 times more likely to die from COVID-19, 5.6 times more likely to be hospitalized from COVID-19, and 2.5 times more risk to be tested positive for COVID-19 than vaccinated people.

Laboratory tests

Laboratory reports from the Utah Department of Health show 4,163,884 people have been tested. This is an increase of 10,444.

The UDOH reports a total of 7,635,746 tests in total, an increase of 20,001 since yesterday.

Tendencies

The 7-day moving average for positive tests is 981 per day.

The 7-day moving average for the percentage of positivity of “people to people” is 11.6%. The 7-day moving average for the percentage of “test-to-test” positivity is 8%.

Hospitalizations

There are currently 457 people hospitalized with COVID-19. The total number of hospitalizations since the start of the epidemic is 27,140.

Death

There are 11 new virus-related deaths reported. The UDOH reports a total of 3,749 deaths.

  1. Female, aged 15-24, resident of Utah County, unknown if hospitalized at time of death *** not underage
  2. Male, 25-44, resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  3. Male, aged 45 to 64, resident of Utah County, unknown if hospitalized at time of death
  4. Woman, aged 65 to 84, resident of Washington County, hospitalized at time of death
  5. Female, aged 65 to 84, resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  6. Female, 25-44, resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  7. Male, over 85, resident of Utah County, resident in long-term care facility
  8. Female, aged 65 to 84, resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  9. Woman, aged 65 to 84, resident of Washington County, hospitalized at time of death
  10. Woman, aged 25 to 44, resident of Utah County, hospitalized at time of death
  11. Male, aged 65 to 84, resident of Iron County, hospitalized at time of death

Today vs Yesterday

Today Yesterday
Total Utahns Tested Positive 622 414 621,008
Total number of people tested 4,163,884 4,153,440
COVID-19 Deaths in Utah 3,749 3,738
Vaccines administered 4,465,357 4,448,663
Utahns currently hospitalized with COVID-19 457 444
Total hospitalizations 27 140 27,093

Utah’s COVID-19 transmission index as of December 22


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Salt lake city government

Ahead of vacation gatherings, ‘omicron is here’, warns Utah virologist


Editor’s note: The Salt Lake Tribune offers free access to critical articles on the coronavirus. Register for our Top Stories newsletter, sent to your inbox every morning. To support journalism like this, please make a donation or become a subscriber.

Ahead of the vacation travel buzz, which is expected to reach pre-pandemic levels at Salt Lake City International Airport this month, a Utah virologist on Tuesday expressed concern over the recent increase in the omicron variant. of the coronavirus.

“Omicron is here, and its frequency is increasing rapidly,” said Stephen Goldstein, virologist and postdoctoral researcher at the University of Utah School of Medicine.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Monday that the omicron variant had overtaken delta as the most dominant strain of the coronavirus in the United States, accounting for about 73.2% of all COVID-19 cases last week.

In an area including Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, and North and South Dakota, model projections released on Monday estimated that omicron accounted for about 62% of new coronavirus cases.

The emerging prevalence of Omicron in Utah continues to be studied. According to Utah Department of Health spokesperson Charla Haley, a genome sequencing test performed at Intermountain Healthcare found the absence of a particular protein – believed to be an indicator of the omicron variant – in 30 % of state tests completed in recent weeks. .

Using the same sequencing test, the Utah Public Health Laboratory also found this missing protein in 11 of 29 COVID-positive samples, or 37.9%, Haley said. She added that the lab would have to completely sequence all 11 to be sure the samples contain the omicron variant or not. So far, the state lab has definitively identified seven cases of omicron in the state, Haley said.

Goldstein said early data from South Africa indicates that the rate of protection offered by current COVID-19 vaccines against all symptoms, mild to severe, has fallen to around 35% – from 65% to 70% effectiveness against other variants.

But that protection rate rises to 70% to 75% for people who have received their third booster dose of the Pfizer or Moderna versions of the vaccine.

Protection against serious illness – something strong enough to land a person in the hospital – remains robust, around 75% effective, compared to 95% effective as vaccines against the delta variant, Goldstein said. .

Federal COVID-19 Plan

President Joe Biden announced updates to his administration’s COVID-19 winter plan on Tuesday afternoon. As part of the plan, the Associated Press reported, the federal government would buy 500 million rapid tests for the coronavirus and send them free to Americans starting in January. People will be able to use a new website to order the tests, which will then be sent free by US mail, the White House said.

Biden’s plan to distribute 500 million free tests is a good start, Goldstein said. “We just need more of them. We need it in stores and pharmacies, not on empty shelves. “

Goldstein also said he would like the federal government to do something similar “to provide people with high quality, reliable masks they can use.” Many KN95 masks available online are fake, Goldstein noted.

Biden’s plan also called for more support to hospitals and increased vaccination and booster efforts.

New cases in Utah

On Tuesday, the Utah Department of Health reported 811 new cases of coronavirus in the past day. The seven-day moving average of new cases stands at 964, the lowest since August 16.

The Department of Health also reported 21 more deaths from COVID-19 on Tuesday. A third of them were people aged 45 to 64.

Nine of the deaths reported on Tuesday occurred before December 1 and were only recently confirmed to have been caused by the coronavirus after further testing.

The number of children vaccinated continues to increase: 88,892 children aged 5 to 11 have received at least one dose since becoming eligible. That’s 24.4% of children that age in Utah, according to the Department of Health. And 54,554 of those children were fully immunized, or 15% of this age group.

State intensive care units remain close to capacity. The UDOH reported Tuesday that 93.2% of all intensive care beds in Utah and 96.3% of intensive care beds in major medical centers in the state are occupied. (Hospitals consider anything above 85% to be functional.) Of all critical care patients, 37.9% are treated for COVID-19.

Vaccine doses administered during the last day / total doses administered • 14,003 / 4,448,663.

Number of Utahns fully vaccinated • 1,880,852 – 57.6% of the total population of Utah. It is an increase of 2,660 in the last day.

Cases reported in the last day • 811.

Cases among school-aged children • Kindergarten to grade 12 children accounted for 93 of the new cases announced on Monday, or 11.5% of the total. There have been 45 reported cases in children aged 5 to 10 years; 22 cases in children 11-13; and 26 cases in children aged 14-18.

Tests reported in the last day • 7 393 people were tested for the first time. A total of 14,694 people have been tested.

Deaths reported in the last day • 21.

There have been five deaths in Utah County – two men and a woman aged 45 to 64, and a man and woman aged 65 to 84.

Salt Lake County has reported three deaths – a man and woman aged 45 to 65 and a woman aged 85 or older. There have also been three deaths in Washington County – one man and two women aged 65 to 84. And there have been three deaths in Weber County – a man and woman aged 65 to 84 and a woman aged 85 or older.

Davis County has reported two deaths – both men aged 65 to 84. There have also been two deaths in Box Elder County – a man and a woman aged 45 to 64. And there have been two deaths in Tooele County – two women aged 65 to 84.

Cache County has reported the death of a woman aged 65 to 84.

Hospitalizations reported during the last day • 444. This is 12 less than what was reported on Monday. Of those currently hospitalized, 182 are in intensive care, 10 fewer than reported on Monday.

Percentage of positive tests • According to the original state method, the rate is 11% over the last day. This is below the seven-day average of 11.9%.

The state’s new method counts all test results, including repeat testing of the same individual. Monday’s rate was 5.5%, below the seven-day average of 8.2%.

[Read more: Utah is changing how it measures the rate of positive COVID-19 tests. Here’s what that means.]

Risk ratios • During the past four weeks, unvaccinated Utahns have been 15.6 times more likely to die from COVID-19 than those vaccinated, according to an analysis from the Utah Department of Health. The unvaccinated were also 9.7 times more likely to be hospitalized and 3.7 times more likely more likely to test positive for coronavirus.

Totals to date • 621,008 case; 3,738 deaths; 27,093 hospitalizations; 4,153,440 people tested.


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Utah economy

Utah population growth 2021: fertility is falling, but migration is on the rise

The Beehive state is growing, and is doing so rapidly. Even if its fertility rate is declining, its migratory balance is rising sharply.

Key elements for tracking this growth in a sustainable manner include housing affordability, air quality control, energy planning and water policy, among others.

Population estimates from the University of Utah’s Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute released Wednesday during its monthly Online Breakfast Newsmaker indicate that the state has added about 71,936 people since the 2020 census, reaching a estimated total of 3,343,552 Utahns. From July 1, 2020 to July 1 of this year, the population increased by 58,729 people. This annual growth rate of 1.8% is the highest since 2017.

These estimates, created by the Utah Population Committee, were compiled from the most recent decennial census.

“For the state of Utah, we have welcomed an average of 160 new residents per day over the past year,” said Emily Harris, senior demographer at the Gardner Institute and lead author of the report. “The state also saw the second recorded net migration and the smallest natural increase since 1975. Estimates for this year indicate a slight rebound as the Utahns navigate a global pandemic and attempt to find a new normal.”

The main findings of the report include:

  • Natural increase: Since July 1, 2010, Utah has experienced an annual decline in the natural increase in population due to fewer new births, while annual deaths increase. National trends during this same period depict a declining fertility rate strongly impacted by the Great Recession. Utah’s total fertility rate fell from 2.45 in 2010 to below the replacement level (1.99 in 2019), from the country’s highest rate to third.
  • Net migration: Utah’s net migration in 2021 is 34,858, nearly 10,000 more than last year’s estimate. This is the highest net migration since 2005 and the seventh year that net migration has exceeded 20,000. Net migration has contributed 59% of Utah’s population growth in the past year. , compared to 49% the previous year.
  • Regional and County Level Results: Iron County saw the fastest growth at 6.2%, followed by Tooele County (4.1%), Washington County (4.0%) and Utah County (2.9% ). Utah County had the highest natural increase, net migration, and population growth in the state, far outpacing Salt Lake County‘s 0.8% growth.

One-third of the statewide growth between July 1, 2020 and July 1, 2021 came from residents of Utah County. Salt Lake County contributed 15.9% of the growth and Washington County 12.5% ​​of the growth. Davis, Weber, Cache, Iron and Tooele counties each contributed between 7.7% and 5.1% of the state’s overall growth. Garfield County was the only county to lose population in 2021.

  • Impacts of COVID-19: Although the anticipated impacts of COVID-19 on births were not apparent in the data, the significant increase in deaths has changed the way the state and many counties have grown. Net migration has become the engine of growth statewide, increasing 15% from the previous year and driving growth in three-quarters of counties. While net migration varies each year in Utah, the natural increase (outside of a global pandemic) generally does not vary. Once COVID-19-related deaths decline, the natural increase is expected to stabilize.

“The secret is revealed”

House Speaker Brad Wilson of R-Kaysville said the growth was “remarkable”.

“The secret is out, how great our state is and how many people want to be here for so many different reasons, and there isn’t just one (reason),” he said, adding that growth presented a unique challenge for the state. but also a great opportunity.

“We’ve benefited as a state for a generation or two from having people who really thought about this stuff and how we can really be collaborative, be responsible, but manage our growth in a way. that benefits every Utahn; and we have to go on and work really hard on this, ”Wilson said.

Laura Hanson, state planning coordinator in the Utah Governor‘s Planning and Budget Office, said she felt lucky to be able to reflect on the direction Utah is taking in long term and stressed that growth offers many opportunities for the state.

“We have jobs, we have new creative ideas, more shopping, more restaurants – although (the growth) is a little scary at times, it is bringing some really good things to our state,” Hanson said. “Unfortunately, some surveys have shown, recently, that the majority of Utahns feel that we are growing too quickly. They feel that the character of their community has changed – we are experiencing more traffic congestion, our areas of recreation is overcrowded. But sadly, we really can’t close the doors or slow down this growth. “

Wilson and Hanson have both said that Utah’s current growth slowdown will lead to a struggling economy and an increase in the cost of living, which neither sees as beneficial.

“What we need to do is really connect with the Utahns and better understand what values ​​you think could be threatened by this growth and what policies or investments the state can take to help us navigate the path. growing and sustaining what makes Utah, Utah, ”Hanson said.

Putting systems in place to cope with Utah’s growth

Wilson said the state-level and political-level goal is to make sure the state is in a better place “than we have found.”

“We need to have processes that lead to longer term thinking and broader thinking about where we are headed, so that we make better decisions in the moment,” Wilson said.

The groundwork for some of that long-term thinking was laid in Utah Gov. Spencer Cox’s $ 25 billion budget proposal for next year, Hanson said.

“I think people who are focusing on growth issues will be really happy with some of the recommendations that are included there,” she said.

The budget proposes about half a billion dollars in investments in the planning and management of water infrastructure, including the financing of the Great Salt Lake, and incentives for water conservation at all levels, from the agriculture to single-family homes.

In addition, the budget includes $ 46.2 million for investments in active transportation to fight air quality problems.

“These are bicycle facilities, sidewalks and pathways so people don’t have to drive a car if they don’t want to and get people off the road,” Hanson added. “We’ve actually had a drop in emissions over the last few years. It shows that when Utah is focused on one goal… we’re really effective at meeting those goals. So I think the air quality in is one that will continue to be at the center of our concerns. “

Hanson also spoke about energy planning and the state’s energy needs which continue to increase with a growing population and an increased focus on electrification.

“We will need to continue to diversify our energy resources, which means investing in new transmission corridors, the basic infrastructure to support charging (of electric vehicles) along the highways in our state,” she said. . “This is another goal and priority for the governor and in his roadmap he identified updating an energy plan – all these different pieces need to come together and we need to keep working together to meet these challenges. “

While the budget also includes $ 228 million to tackle affordable housing and homelessness, Wilson said the problem is more supply-side and demand-side.

“We need to do a better job of getting more supply to market faster; and we need our municipalities, in particular, to be a little more agile and a little faster in the way they approve projects so that we can solve this problem – this is the only solution to increase the supply on the market, ”Wilson added. “My concern about the affordability of housing is how will our children and grandchildren afford to stay here? “

The full population estimates from the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute are available online here.

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Salt lake city

SLC Police Discover Bounty Of Illicit Weapons In Drunk Driving Arrest


SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – A man has been arrested after a drunk driver was discovered on Monday with a treasure trove of dangerous weapons.

Salt Lake City Police identified the suspect as 26-year-old Onkar Singh.

Police said the incident occurred in the 1400 South 300 West area when officers responded to reports of a possible road rage incident. When the police tried to arrest Singh, he was uncooperative and fled in a “reckless manner”.

Officers eventually found him in a parking lot at 1200 South 900 West. Police suspected Singh of driving under the influence and arrested him for drinking and driving.

During the investigation, the police discovered a quantity of dangerous weapons in Singh’s possession, including a handgun loaded with the serial number shaved off, two batons, several knives, a sword, an American hand knife. and two daggers sai.

Singh was arrested on charges of impaired driving, refusal to take a chemical test, obstructing justice, disorderly driving, on counts of possession of a dangerous weapon, possession of drug paraphernalia, reckless driving, etc. .

Singh is currently reserved at the Salt Lake County Metropolitan Jail. Authorities are still investigating the case for now.


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Salt lake city

Check out these lesser-known resources at a Salt Lake City or county library near you


Libraries offer more than just books. These are life enriching resource centers today, and the Salt Lake City Public Library and Salt Lake County Library are no exception.

If you’re new to Salt Lake City, here’s a breakdown of the two major library systems in the area.

– The Salt Lake City Public Library System (aka the City Library) is headquartered in the Downtown Main Library and also has seven smaller branches in city neighborhoods. All residents of Salt Lake City or Salt Lake City County can obtain a free library card from the municipal library. For more information visit SLCPL.org.

– The Salt Lake County Library System (aka the County Library) covers a much larger area than the City Library, with 18 branches spread across the Salt Lake Valley. All county residents can get a free library card from the county library. For more information visit SLCOlibrary.org.

Trish Hull, director of the County Library’s Kearns branch, said libraries are “the heart of democracy” because they provide everyone with equal access to information and education.

“We are an equalizer,” she said. To access everything in the following list, all you need is a free library card.

Cultivate your garden

Established in 2019 – in partnership with Wasatch Community Gardens – the City Library’s free seed library allows anyone to request seeds, then bring them home and plant them. Initially based only in the Main Library, the Seed Library has expanded to include Day-Riverside, Marmalade, Glendale and Sprague branches.

Just read the seed catalog – which features an ever-changing variety of vegetables, herbs and flowers – then place your order in line or in person.

Once your garden is finished, save plant seeds and share them, either by giving them to a friend or neighbor or by returning them to the library.

The Seed Library encourages people not to waste seeds, which have the potential “to be a plant that can nourish others in the community,” said Liesl Jacobson, deputy director of community engagement for the library. from the city.

Where: Browse the seed catalog on services.slcpl.org/theplot and pick up orders at the Main Library in downtown Salt Lake City. Or visit a participating branch in person.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) The Seed Library, at the Marmalade branch of the SLC Public Library System, Thursday, November 18, 2021.

Take food for the brain

The city and county library systems have partnered with the Utah Food Bank to provide free food to children and teens under the age of 18 as part of the Kids’ Cafe program.

The municipal library distributes snacks at its Marmalade and Glendale branches, as well as at the main library. For hours and other information, visit services.slcpl.org/kids-cafe.

The County Library provides free lunch bags for children at the following locations: Hunter, Kearns, Magna, Smith, Tyler and West Valley. For hours and other information, visit https://www.slcolibrary.org/information/FAQs.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Kid’s Cafe is offering free meals for children up to 18 years old at the Kearns Library on Wednesday, June 30, 2021. Here are some non-book resources available at Utah libraries for you. may not be familiar with about including to the new Kearns library. From access to a sound studio, 3D printers, bike repair tools and more, libraries are sources for a variety of rewarding resources, not just books.

Improve your skills

When a car’s brake pads squeal or a kitchen faucet leaks, ignore the repair bill and learn how to fix it yourself with digital how-to guides.

You can also learn to write a resume, take arts and crafts classes, or become a Microsoft Excel assistant. Selection varies by library system and branch.

Where: at SLCPL.org, click on “Explore”, then on “Digital Library”, then search by subject. TO SLCOlibrary.org, click on the “Learn” tab. Then under “Popular Topics” click on “How To”.

Read the newspaper

All library patrons across the state have unlimited access to The Salt Lake Tribune at sltrib.com, including subscriber-only stories.

Thanks to the municipal library website, you can also read The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, as well as 600 international, national and regional newspapers through ProQuest Newsstand (in the digital library).

Borrow from the Library of Things

Discover new technologies and even new worlds with the growth of the County Library Library of things. The equipment collection is free for adult customers and includes Internet hotspots, Chromebooks, tablets, and telescopes for stargazing.

The “Preserve Memory” equipment also available will allow you to start digitizing those shoeboxes of old photos, films, slides and cassettes for future generations.

Where: Selection varies by branch and is subject to availability. Go to SLCOlibrary.org for more information. The municipal library also digital conversion equipment.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) One of the telescopes that can be checked out, at the Marmalade branch of the SLC Public Library System, Thursday, November 18, 2021.

Listen to local tunes

Find something truly unique to hum by browsing the HUM database at hum.slcpl.org. Organized by a group of musicians, writers and producers, HUM is a treasure house of local music ranging in style from rock to country.

Use your library card to stream and download for free.

To show creativity

The cost of high-quality equipment needed for 3D printing, embroidery, engraving, robotics, design or sound production shouldn’t hold back your creativity.

The County Library’s selection of equipment and software will allow any artist to explore and grow. For a full list of everything available, visit slcolibrary.org/information/create.

The municipal library also offers a large material selection for photography, sewing (bring your own yarn and fabric), graphic design, button making, lamination, video production and more.

Where: County Library’s Holladay, Kearns, and Magna branches, or the Town Library’s Main Library, as well as Marmalade, Glendale, and Sprague branches.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) The Marmalade branch of the Salt Lake City Public Library System has sewing machines, as reported on Thursday, November 18, 2021.

Play the game

Discover your next favorite board game at the Marmalade Game Exchange, the latest addition to the Marmalade branch of The City Library.

Just bring a lightly used board game (make sure all the pieces are inside) to the library and exchange it for a new game that you can take home and keep.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) The Game Exchange, at the Marmalade branch of the SLC Public Library System, Thursday, November 18, 2021.

Remember the good times

Memory care kits, designed for people with Alzheimer’s or dementia, are now available through the municipal library.

The kits come in five different themes: music, travel, pets, the outdoors or transportation. Each kit contains DVDs, toys, books, CDs and other items that can “spark conversations, provide respite for caregivers and come up with activities that can stimulate memories,” the library said.

To browse the different kits, visit SLCPL.org.


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Salt lake city

SLC leaders ‘frustrated’ as town again resorts to temporary shelter for winter homeless people


Cars parked outside the Ramada Inn in Salt Lake City on Wednesday. The site was chosen as an emergency homeless shelter this winter. (KSL-TV)

Estimated reading time: 6-7 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY – Leaders in the Utah capital are not happy that the city has once again been chosen to house an emergency winter shelter.

Salt Lake City Council, in a meeting Tuesday, reluctantly approved the Ramada Inn at 1659 W. North Temple as the site of a temporary 250-bed overflow this winter. Officials from the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness said the temporary facility will be a “safe, 24-hour, no-congregation environment” that will allow homeless people to escape the cold this winter.

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall explained that the county coalition had selected the site and asked Salt Lake City to approve the use of an emergency shelter.

Although they recognized the need for the shelter, what upset the mayor and several members of the city council is that the city was wiretapped by the state for the three years that a shelter d urgency was needed following the decision to close The Road Home.

“I am frustrated by the disproportionate and largely unsupported efforts Salt Lake City is making to the statewide homelessness crisis,” Mendenhall said, moments before the council vote on Tuesday. “My frustration seems equal to that of City Council, where today’s discussion reflected a waning desire to permanently house the vast majority of services in this county without the financial support that should accompany that service.”

This winter’s shelter will be the second in a row to be found on the west side of town, an area Salt Lake City Councilor Ana Valdemoros called “the already stressed part of town.” She said police and firefighters requested more staff and overtime, and apologized for not being able to answer every call.

Valdemoros argued that a recent report that a homeless shelter was not feasible in other Utah towns and unincorporated areas of the county is an example that Salt Lake City has been pushed “into a corner” and ashamed if he didn’t open an emergency shelter.

Salt Lake City Councilor Victoria Petro-Eschler, who was sworn in last week and represents the area in which the shelter will be located, agreed. She added that she was concerned about issues that could arise for residents and small businesses near the emergency shelter.

“Asking the city to shoulder this burden once is an emergency. Having been asked multiple times now, with the west side significantly targeted, is a model,” Petro-Eschler said. “This model should disqualify this type of emergency demand. It is more of a seasonal demand.”

The additional resources needed for the shelter are why Salt Lake City Councilor Darin Mano said he believes the state should help cover the city’s costs.

There were also concerns about the intended property for the shelter raised at the meeting. Nigel Swaby, chairman of the Fairpark Community Council, said he visited the site earlier today and was “in poor condition”. He said he saw fixtures and floor coverings stripped from some rooms; some had a toilet above the beds.

“It will cost a lot more money and take longer to bring this building up to code than the time needed to provide housing in this year’s overflow,” he said.

Alejandro Puy, who was confirmed as the winner of the Salt Lake City Council District 2 race earlier Tuesday, said he had also visited the “place of great concern”.

“This motel is run down and I’m very worried,” Puy said. “I don’t know who’s going to pay to fix and code the place, but it’s very, very concerning – the state of it.”


At the end of the day, I don’t think we, as a group of elected officials, can have people potentially to freeze to death on the streets of our city.

–Chris Wharton, Salt Lake City Councilor


While city leaders and residents were not happy with the position they have been placed in, they also know time is running out. Temperatures in Salt Lake City fell below freezing overnight; the National Weather Service noted these are the coldest temperatures recorded in the city since the end of March. It’s a reminder that winter is fast approaching.

At the same time, the existing permanent shelters in Salt Lake County are already filling up. Andrew Johnston, the city’s director of homeless policy and outreach, told council in a working session earlier Tuesday that use of homeless shelters is “quite high,” at 97% in all areas.

Mendenhall recently posted a six-month hiatus on creating any new permanent shelter in the city, again explaining on Tuesday that the city “hosts far more than its fair share of homeless services” in the state. However, she added that she “intentionally” allowed an avenue to open for temporary overflow facilities because she believed residents would rather have temporary shelter in their city than see the homeless. having “nowhere to go, freezing in our streets”.

It was this sentiment that persuaded five of the seven city councilors to vote in favor of the shelter. Salt Lake City Councilor Chris Wharton said the vote was “difficult”. On the one hand, the city will be burdened with an additional burden which could exacerbate the problems in its west side; on the other hand, it can lead to a “life and death” situation for many homeless people if the state does not have an emergency winter shelter.

“At the end of the day, I don’t think we, as a group of elected officials, can have people potentially frozen to death on the streets of our city,” Wharton said. “It’s a national epidemic, but… Salt Lake City is escalating and doing so every year because our residents appreciate and understand that this is a crisis that we must at least do our part and try to protect. . “

The Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness said the new space will have “24/7 onsite security, shuttles to transport customers, meals and connections to other services.” It says there will be 300 overflow beds available until April 2022.

This figure includes motel coupons in other cities and rugs from the St. Vincent de Paul Dining Room and Weigand Homeless Resource Center.

“We know that there are many players involved in the development of these solutions and we are committed to being good partners to ensure we are providing consistent care to homeless people in collaboration with the surrounding community,” wrote the coalition in a press release. “We know the surrounding neighborhoods have faced a lot of pressures over the years and we look forward to working with the community as we serve our most vulnerable residents this winter. “

Meanwhile, Mendenhall says more needs to be done in the future so that Salt Lake City does not have to cover the costs of emergency shelter on its own. She said beds at homeless shelters should be distributed among other towns in the county and that Salt Lake City should secure “adequate” public funding for the public safety costs associated with running the shelter, which would otherwise fall on the city’s taxpayers.

Although frustrated with the process, the mayor said she still applauds the city council vote given the circumstances.

“This action will save lives,” she said. “But I know we all agree that the residents and businesses of Salt Lake City deserve a more balanced path forward.”

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Salt lake city government

Utah House Approves Congressional Map Carving Out Salt Lake County | US government and politics


By LINDSAY WHITEHURST Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – The Republican-controlled Utah House on Tuesday approved new congressional maps that set aside the work of an independent voter-approved redistribution commission in favor of limits that further cut out the Democratic-leaning Salt Lake County.

The cards were passed by 50 votes to 22, despite opposition from minority Democrats who urged lawmakers to support the redistribution cards created by the commission. “It robs the voter of the city and it is not necessary,” said Representative Jennifer Dailey-Provost, a Democrat from Salt Lake City.

But Republican Representative Paul Ray, who helped draw the newly approved maps, said they better reflect the state as a whole by including a mix of urban and rural voters. “Population data determines what we do,” he said.

The bill now goes to the State Senate.

The new districts will determine how voters elect members of Congress for the next decade. While much of Utah is conservative, one of its four congressional districts has been a swing district. The new maps will likely make the 4th Republican District more reliable by dividing liberal-leaning Salt Lake County into four districts rather than the three it is currently divided into.

Some Republicans have voted against the new plan as well, including Rep. Ray Ward: “There must be places where people know it could go both ways,” he said.

People also read …

The vote comes a day after dozens of frustrated people gathered to call on lawmakers to use one of the maps created by the Utah Independent Redistribution Commission. It was created after a slim majority of voters approved a voting initiative in 2018, but lawmakers weren’t required to use any of the cards they drew up.

House leaders said they took some of the commission’s results into account in creating the new maps, but said the state’s constitution gave them the power to draw new legislative districts.

“The elected representatives of the Legislature take their responsibility very seriously to do what they think is right,” Utah House President Brad Wilson said.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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Salt lake city government

Set Up To Fail: The Impact of Private Probation on the Poor


SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – Utah is one of the few states that allows private probation companies to control critical aspects of a person’s life. They decide what low-level offenders must do and pay to get out of the criminal justice system.

Probation aims to give people a chance to avoid prison by taking certain courses, treatment and tests. However, with private agencies taking direct advantage of these requirements, many people believe they are taking advantage of the system.

ABC4’s Jillian Smukler spoke with several probationers who went through private providers in Utah about their experiences. They have asked to remain anonymous for fear of retaliation and privacy concerns.

In Utah, thousands of people are currently on probation. With more and more low-level offenders being sent to private probation providers, concerns are growing as to whether they have their best interests in mind.

“How many courses can we enroll you in?” What requirements can we put on you that make it hard to do anything else because you know if you don’t do it right… private provider in Salt Lake County.

“I remember when I was making my first date with them I was paying and a lady was next to me and she said in front of them ‘this place is a joke’ and ‘they are going to keep you here as long as possible” said another probationer who went through another private Salt Lake County supplier.

Defense lawyer and former prosecutor Greg Skordas said he believes private probation agencies have a place in our criminal justice system. However, he said there is an inherent conflict for an agency to do both assessment and treatment.

“We all know, those of us who work in the system, that there are certain agencies that have a certain reputation… whether deserved or not… that they just keep keeping people in their system. It’s a revolving door, ”Skordas said.

This Skordas reference system was born out of necessity. In 1990, lawmakers passed the Private Probation Provider Licensing Act to ease the pressure on the overwhelmed public agency.

Fast forward 31 years later, there are 90 active private probation providers in Utah, including 26 in Salt Lake County.

“Historically, we’ve said this is something that shouldn’t happen, and the mix creates this conflict,” Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said.

Gill believes that assessments and treatments should be done by separate agencies, so the financial motivation to keep offenders longer is not there.

“We want to make sure that people receive direct proportional assistance without being systematically forced into longer treatment or mistreatment because they have been convicted of or ordered to do so,” said Gill.

ABC4 spoke with the owner of one of Salt Lake County’s 26 private probation agencies who disagreed.

“He says there is a problem with an agency like mine because there may be an inherent risk for the client because they are in the same agency. Yet I am not making treatment recommendations. I can give my advice to my advisers when they say “hey, I just saw one of your clients you see on probation, they say they never had any criminal charges, they say they have never had an education and they say there is no problem. ‘ And I say ‘whoa… are you serious?’ ”

Private probation providers can charge offenders for classes, drug and alcohol testing, and anything else they deem necessary for treatment. If the person is unable to pay, the probation officer could issue an offense and the offender could end up in jail.

“I remember hearing people say they were threatened, coerced, saying ‘if you don’t pay I’m going to send a negative report,’” said Gill.

However, the owner of a private probation provider says financial obligation helps hold offenders accountable.

“If they know they have to pay me $ 30 and they know that I will be doing case management services with them for that $ 30 appointment, they prepare to ask for help.

While these for-profit agencies rely on fees to generate income, other county-funded probation services do not have this problem.

“We offer waivers. So we have a monthly $ 15 probation fee if someone can’t afford that, we work with them. We can reduce it to $ 10… $ 5… or to zero. So it really depends on the individual and where they are, ”said Kele Griffone, Salt Lake County Division Director of Criminal Justice Services.

When someone is subject to a probation order, some of them choose their provider, others not.

“It’s a trap because in some jurisdictions you don’t have the supporting infrastructure you need from a government-based model so you have private vendors setting up a store there,” said Gill.

“In large counties, state and county services are overwhelmed. They don’t have the resources to take care of all the offenders, so the courts need these private probation services to pick up the people the state just isn’t going to pay for, ”Skordas said.

Skordas also said it all depends on the judge the offender is assigned to and the county they are in.

“Some judges will have agencies that they like and there may be only one agency in the courtroom and the judge will say ‘there is the judge you are going to see,'” Skordas said.

Many probationers believe there should be more transparency in their options.

“These people make you feel like you have to do it over there. And for me, it extended my time in the justice system because I had to choose between staying with them or working… because they prevented me from doing both, ”said a probationer who went through a private provider of the Salt Lake County.

“If someone feels like they are being exploited, there should be a way for them to set off these alarms without consequences for them,” Salt Lake County DA Gill said.

Until assessments and treatments are separated, Gill believes probationers will continue to run the risk of remaining in the criminal justice system.

“We are perpetuating this cycle of violence. We are perpetuating that and we are constantly using taxpayer dollars to solve a problem that we are helping to create through our inaction, ”said Gill.

Oscar Mata is the CEO of the Ethics Review Center in Ogden. It is a statewide accredited JRI institution that offers assessments, Prime for Life, and online courses.

“The question I always ask myself is ‘who benefits from all the treatments?’ I would say it’s not the community… it’s the treatment providers, ”Mata said.

Mata worked with Rep. Lou Shurtliff on Bill 55 before his death.

The bill, which would prevent private providers from doing both assessments and court-ordered treatments, was blocked by an internal committee. Some of his supporters are hoping another lawmaker will pick him up.

“I hope there is someone on the State Capitol who has the courage to stand up for this… this is important. I don’t care who you are. Everyone makes mistakes, and some mistakes are worse than others. No one should be exploited for monetary gain because of this mistake, ”Mata said.

In the meantime, some are calling for more oversight on these private probation agencies.

“If the courts and the legislature could say, ‘Look, we’re going to regulate what you do, what services you provide for certain crimes, and there will be state-mandated services… penalties if you will.’ So that they don’t just say “We think you need this class” when the rest of us go “we don’t even know what this class means,” said Greg Skordas.

Some owners of private probation providers agree that more rules are needed.

“I know people are being abused. I know… I know most of the complaints you’ve heard about… if the government had a better structure and better regulations for us, would be able to show you that what that complaint was is not necessarily a violation or unethical or unprofessional, ”a private probation owner said.

These private probation agencies are licensed by the Professional and Professional Licensing Division of the Department of Commerce.

Communications director Zach Whitney said that unless someone files a complaint with his division, he doesn’t send any of his investigators to make sure the company is following the rules.

“If there’s a real complaint or something substantial that our rules don’t oversee, then the Department of Social Services and / or DOPL can’t do anything about it. Thus, a customer who has a problem has just been closed by the State when he has a problem. Instead of… you know the investigator is actually able to come to me and say ‘hey, there’s this problem’. Can we talk about it so that I can give them your perception and what is your information? Said a private probation owner.


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Salt lake city

🌱 Fatal motorcycle crash + violent fight in downtown SLC


Happy Monday, people of Salt Lake City! Here’s everything you need to know to get started today on an informed note. Here is what is happening in the city today.


First of all, the weather forecast for the day:

Cloudy and sunny weather. High: 53 Low: 41.


Here are the best stories today in Salt Lake City:

  1. Authorities have released the identity of a motorcyclist who died in a crash that closed southbound lanes of I-15 on Friday evening. According to Utah Department of Public Safety, Michael rogers, 42, from Lehi, is said to have switched to HOV lanes in the 12300 South in clothier, but he did not leave enough space between him and the vehicle in front of him. (KUTV 2News)
  2. Three people are in jail after a violent brawl breaks out in the city center Salt lake city Saturday morning. Authorities said they received reports for the first time of a “big fight” near 39 E. Place of exchange around 2 a.m. When police arrived at the scene, they found three people injured. The Salt Lake City Police Department said one of those arrested was 23 years old Your Uelese who faces a charge of aggravated assault. (ABC 4)
  3. The J. Willard Marriott Library to University of Utah opened a new exhibition created by the Indigenous and Allied Students Association in celebration of Native American Heritage Month. (ABC 4)
  4. Salt lake city leaders unveiled a new arboretum on Saturday morning at the town’s historic cemetery, dedicated to its oldest sexton, Marc Smith. (Salt Lake City Tribune)
  5. The Utah Legislative Redistribution Committee released its proposed maps late Friday night. Salt Lake County was divided into four congressional districts, which is perhaps the most controversial part of the proposal. The current map of Congress divides it into three districts. (KUER 90.1)

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Today in Salt Lake City:

  • City Council Meeting – Town of Mill Creek (5:00 p.m.)
  • Community reinvestment agency meeting (7:00 p.m.)

From our sponsors – thank you for supporting the local news!


That’s all for today. See you soon! If you like these newsletters, consider inviting some of your friends and neighbors to read them. You can send them this link to subscribe.

Sean peek

About me: Sean Peek is a writer and entrepreneur who graduated in English Literature from Weber State University. Over the years, he has worked as a copywriter, editor, SEO specialist and marketing manager for various digital media companies. He is currently the co-owner and operator of the content creation agency Lightning Media Partners.


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Salt lake city

Major road improvements are underway for Mill Creek, but will they improve the popular canyon?


Acre for acre, few outdoor recreation areas in Utah are used more than Mill Creek Canyon, the heavily forested destination where a nine mile drive connects Salt Lake City to many backcountry trails in the Wasatch Mountains.

So many people visit to hike, fish, cycle, have a picnic, ski, and most noticeably run their dogs that the road is crowded with cars under the winter gate most weekends. weekends and evenings all year round and above the door in summer.

Salt Lake County posted a plan to widen the upper canyon narrow winding road in the hope of reducing congestion and protecting the watershed. But some canyon enthusiasts wonder if pouring more asphalt would really help or just make matters worse.

County officials on Wednesday proposed nearly $ 20 million in upgrades for the upper canyon, which they say are needed to accommodate the growing number of cars in the canyon. Salt Lake County and the US Forest Service are looking to widen the 4.5-mile road beyond the Winter Gate to the Big Water Trailhead in a primarily funded $ 38 million program speak Federal Land Access Program, or FLAP.

“We know this canyon is loved by so many people and it’s really about preparing for the future,” Salt Lake County Mayor Jenny Wilson said at an event at the now closed gate. ‘winter. “This is a plan to improve access, manage access, and build the amenities we all need when we recreate ourselves here. One of them being efficient parking, one of them being better trailheads [and] in appropriate places, widening of the road. I know the Forest Service is very sensitive to this topography and we’re not going to do anything that doesn’t make sense.

(Brian Maffly | The Salt Lake Tribune) Salt Lake District Ranger Bekee Hotze of the US Forest Service reveals plans to upgrade the deteriorating narrow road at the top of Utah’s popular Mill Creek Canyon, shown behind her on Wednesday, November 3, 2021. Also pictured, left to right, Salt Lake County Planning Officer Helen Peters, Mayor Jenny Wilson and Millcreek Mayor Jeff Silvestrini.

The road would be closed during construction from fall 2024 to spring 2026, while the high canyon backcountry would still be accessible by trail from the terraces, pipeline and nearby Lambs Canyon.

Many people cherish the upper Mill Creek Canyon as it is today, with its narrow, low-speed road, and fear that road improvements could alter the character of the canyon. A wider road could bring even more traffic to an already saturated place, Carl Fisher, executive director of Save our canyons.

“Improvements are needed, of course, but are we building more things in the canyons to accommodate more people? The answer seems to be yes, ”Fisher said in an interview. “We’re on the verge of losing any semblance of Wasatch we once knew.”

About five miles from the canyon, the road is closed for at least eight months a year, from November 1 or earlier to June 30. Although closed to cars, it sees even more traffic during this time when it is used by cyclists, cross-country skiers, hikers, children in sleds and canine companions. Widening the route would do little to improve the experience for these seasonal users and would likely degrade it, critics say.

Some stakeholders have explored a shuttle system for the canyon, but that idea has not caught on with the Forest Service, which oversees public lands in the mountains above Salt Lake City.

The agency is proposing to completely rebuild the road and widen it 29 feet from the winter gate at Elbow Fork and up to 24 feet for the last three miles to the Big Water Trailhead.

“Access to Mill Creek Canyon and facilities in the canyon is deteriorating and not keeping up with current use,” said Bekee Hotze, Salt Lake City District, Forest Service. “Where possible, the road will be widened to accommodate the multiple uses we currently see in the canyon. “

Parking would be improved at high-traffic areas such as Alexander Basin, Big Water, and Elbow Fork, but would be eliminated along the roadway where the parking lot broke the sides of the road.

“You want the road base to stay on the road, you don’t want that in your feed. The road is made of tars and chemicals which, when thrown into the waterway, are not good for the fish, ”Hotze said. “So this project will add retaining walls where needed to ensure the base of the road stays where it is intended.”

Bike paths would be added, but not everywhere.

“In some parts of the route it is not possible to widen the route enough and maintain the character of the canyon,” Hotze said.

Officials will host an open house on November 9 at Millcreek Town Hall from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. and will be accepting public comment until December 9.

A $ 15 million FLAP grant would fund this work in the Upper Canyon with local sources, adding a matching $ 4 million. An equal-sized FLAP investment is being considered for the lower canyon, which is open to cars all year round, but at a later date.

Like the neighboring canyons of Big and Little Cottonwood, Mill Creek has seen a significant influx of recreational use in recent years as more Utahns discover natural wonders just outside of the major population centers of the State along the Wasatch front. Since the start of 2020, the pandemic has pushed many people outside, accelerating overcrowding in Utah’s canyons and other destinations.

Even before the pandemic, traffic in Mill Creek was skyrocketing from 192,000 vehicles in 2013 to 1 million last year, according to county spokeswoman Jordan Carroll. Mill Creek is especially popular with dog owners, whose furry friends aren’t allowed in protected watersheds, such as Cottonwood, City Creek, and Parleys Canyons.

Julie Jag | The Salt Lake Tribune Although some trees have lost their leaves, many are still colorful along the Red Pine Road Trail in Mill Creek Canyon on Thursday, October 7, 2021.

“It’s so beautiful and natural. And sadly, as our population in Utah grows, these places can be loved to death. And the purpose of this grant is to close that gap and do some things that are necessary to preserve the wilderness of this canyon, preserve the watershed, provide better access so people can get up here and park, ” said Jeff Silvestrini, Mayor of Millcreek. . “Mill Creek Canyon is an asset that everyone in Salt Lake Valley appreciates, but it’s the backyard of Millcreek, and that’s why my town is particularly interested in this canyon. This is why we organized the open day on this subject.

The Uinta-Wasatch Cache National Forest oversees Mill Creek Canyon in partnership with the county, which charges visitors $ 5 per vehicle exiting the canyon to generate revenue to cover maintenance of the many amenities that line the causeway. Annual passes cost $ 50.

Revenue generated from the fees, which had been increased in January 2020, has nearly doubled since 2016, from $ 583,000 to over $ 1 million last year, according to county data.

These revenues generally do not fund upgrades, such as new parking at Rattlesnake Gulch or new trails at Rattlesnake and Alexander Basin. But some could be tapped to meet local matching requirements for FLAP grants, according to Carroll.


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Salt lake city

Ken Ivory wants to return to the Utah legislature


Good Monday morning Utah! Thanks for reading “The Rundown”.

📬 Send me your story ideas, tips, questions, comments, or anything else that comes to mind. You can reach me by e-mail. You can also find me on social networks: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn Where Reddit

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(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Rep. Ken Ivory asks a few questions about the broad tax review bill during his first public hearing at a committee meeting on Friday, March 1, 2019.

The return of Ken Ivory?

Former Rep. Ken Ivory is considering returning to Capitol Hill in Utah.

The sudden resignation of Representative Steve Christiansen last week means Republican delegates in HD47 will choose his replacement for the 2022 session. Ivory, who resigned that seat in 2019, has informed Salt Lake County GOP leaders that he was a candidate to replace Christiansen.

Ivory resigned from the legislature in August 2019 to take a job at a company that won a $ 700,000 state contract that he helped lead through the legislature before stepping down.

During his previous term in the legislature, Ivory advocated for states to gain more control over their public lands. He has had ethical complaints filed against him, claiming that his work with the American Lands Council, a nonprofit organization he began advocating for transferring public lands to states, scammed counties into they donate money to this organization.

HD47 delegates chose Christiansen to replace Ivory after her resignation.

Sources say “The Rundown” Ivory is already reaching out to delegates for their support ahead of the special election.

So far, the other declared candidate in the race is Nathan Brun, who lost the GOP primary to Christiansen last year by 834 votes.

The the special election will take place on November 15, which means that the HD47 seat will be vacant during the special redistribution session. Candidates can enter the race until November 13.

Here’s what you need to know for Monday morning

Utah

🚨 Before resigning suddenly last week, Rep. Steve Christiansen was looking to get his hands on the personal information of thousands of voters in Utah. It appears he would give this information to a far-right group aiming to go door-to-door to match voters with votes seeking electoral fraud. [Tribune]

🚨 Robert Gehrke of the Tribune reports that Republicans in the Utah Senate have had a preview of their new district maps, including partisan breakdown. This was before the independent redistribution commission finished its work. [Tribune]

💉 Utah joins several other states in a lawsuit against the federal COVID-19 vaccine mandate for employees of government contractors. [Tribune]

Tomorrow is election day in Utah. Preferential voting could delay results in several cities. [Tribune]

  • Mysterious text messages rock a race at city council in Draper. [Tribune]

  • Policing is the number one issue for voters in the Salt Lake City District 5 contest. [Tribune]

🏛 Representative Adam Kinzinger visited Utah last week. He exclusively explained to The Tribune why Republicans have become so enthralled with former President Donald Trump, the Jan.6 inquiry and political tribalism. [Tribune]

🥾 Utah wants to attract the Outdoor Retailers Trade Show to Salt Lake City, but one wonders if the political environment in the state of Beehive is to the liking of the organizers. [Tribune]

🌎 Representative John Curtis and his Conservative climate caucus are traveling to Glasgow this week for the COP26 climate talks. [Tribune]

🤦‍♂️ Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert’s campaign has erroneously stated that she represents Utah in her FEC disclosure documents. [Forbes]

national

➡️ READ: FBI and Other Law Enforcement Agencies Missed Warnings While Others Failed To Pass Out Critical Information Ahead of Jan.6 Attack on U.S. Capitol . [WaPo]

The House plans to vote on two spending bills on Tuesday. The $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure package and a $ 1.75 trillion social program proposal are critical parts of President Joe Biden’s agenda. [CNN]

📊 Approval for President Biden’s job drops to just 42% in a new poll. [NBC News]

The race for governor in Virginia is heading towards the wire. This could cause big problems for Democrats. [WSJ]

⚖️ The Supreme Court will hear two challenges to the near-total ban on abortions in Texas. [NYT]

⚖️ A challenge to New York’s gun licensing law is on the Supreme Court’s record on Wednesday, which could lead to a significant extension of gun rights. [AP]

✈️ American Airlines canceled hundreds of flights over the weekend due to staff issues and bad weather. [WaPo]

💉 More than 24,000 New York City municipal workers were not vaccinated against COVID by today’s deadline. These employees will be put on unpaid leave and the city is bracing for a staff shortage. [Bloomberg]

🦠 COVID-19 has killed more than 5 million people worldwide. [CNN]

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Representatives Adam Kinzinger and Evan McMullin in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, October 27, 2021.

Kinzinger backs McMullin in race for US Senate

Representative Adam Kinzinger traveled to Utah last week to do a small fundraiser for his PAC and endorse Evan McMullin, who is running for the US Senate as an independent.

“He’s someone who loves his country, and I think we’re at a time when people are putting their loyalty to a party rather than their loyalty to the country,” Kinzinger said.

Kinzinger and McMullin have known each other for several years, starting when McMullin was a member of the House Foreign Affairs committee.

Kinzinger’s endorsement is important, if only for his role on the House committee investigating the January 6 attack. Kinzinger was one of the strongest supporters of the attempted insurgency that day and the role played by former President Donald Trump.

It’s a stark contrast to Senator Mike Lee, who McMullin will likely face next November. We recently learned that Lee was aware of the memo from Trump’s attorney John Eastman explaining how the 2020 election could be called off, but said nothing. Even knowing this, and following the violent attack on the United States Capitol, Lee voted to acquit Trump in his second impeachment trial.

Endorsements don’t usually decide who wins or loses an election, but they do help candidates build a narrative. If McMullin decides to make 1/6 a problem, that might draw a clear line.

(Read my exclusive one-on-one interview with Kinzinger here)

Monday Morning Utah News Summary

Utah

  • The Salt Lake City Convention Hotel takes to the skies. Will the conventions bounce back? [Tribune]

  • The coal miner who failed to restore farmland will be shut down if he does not repair his “fraudulent” link, regulators say. [Tribune]

  • The state is considering the northern Utah Valley to store water from the Bear River. [Tribune]

  • Utah hospitals are collecting used crutches, walkers and canes in response to supply chain issues. [Tribune]

  • Utah Supreme Court Justice Deno Himonas retires, plans revert to private sector. [Tribune]

  • After COVID, employees in Utah will see more flexibility in how and where they work. [Tribune]

  • Some Utah resorts already have enough snow to open, but do they have the employees? [Deseret News]

  • Utah Small Businesses Share Tales of Struggle with the Governor. [Fox 13]

  • Almost 20 years later, a study examines the Olympic impacts on the Park City community. [KPCW]

COVID-19[feminine

  • Au milieu de COVID-19, les vaccinations infantiles ont considérablement diminué dans l’Utah. [Tribune]

  • Children who contract COVID-19 can suffer from serious illness, warns a leading Utah doctor. [Tribune]

  • Unified firefighter captain dies of complications from COVID-19. [Tribune]

  • More children hospitalized with COVID-19, according to a Utah doctor, because the vaccine is licensed for ages 5 to 11. [Deseret News]

Education

  • Utah universities aren’t disclosing computer science students quickly enough for Silicon Slopes. That may soon change. [Tribune]

  • The Utahns’ top priority for the budget surplus? Spend it on education, poll shows. [Deseret News]

  • A Minnesota company will donate $ 3.3 million to the Utah Board of Education after technical issues botched student tests. [Deseret News]

Religion

  • Religious Tribune reporter Peggy Fletcher Stack will lead an international journalism group. [Tribune]

  • Leading Latter-day Saint leaders visit refugees in northern Iraq. [Tribune]

Opinion

  • Ben Anderson: Utah should focus on fair cards, not political games. [Tribune]

  • Mitt Romney isn’t mean, but that doesn’t mean he’s right about taxes, writes George Pyle. [Tribune]

  • Opinion: Here’s why Utah lawmakers should adopt the independent commission’s political maps. [Deseret News]

🎂 You say it’s your birthday? !!

Happy Birthday to Salt Lake County Mayor Jenny Wilson.

Do you have a birthday that you would like us to recognize in this space? Send us an e-mail.



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Salt lake city government

Representative Christiansen, who lobbied for an election audit, suddenly leaves the Utah legislature


SALT LAKE CITY – Representative Stephen Christiansen, who requested an audit of the 2020 elections in a state that went to President Donald Trump, has suddenly left the Utah state legislature.

“It is with very mixed emotions that I announce my resignation from the Utah House of Representatives. The past two years have been extremely informative and educational,” he said in a letter sent Wednesday night to Speaker of the House, Brad Wilson.

Christiansen Representative R-West Jordan cited attacks on his family as the reason for his resignation, defending his conservative political views.

“My time in the legislature has increasingly been spent pushing back against government excesses, excessive spending growth, policies that limit freedoms and liberty, and anything that weakens faith, families, sanctity. of life and the sacred rights with which we have been blessed. . I have tried to do this in a respectful, professional, factual, yet clear and passionate manner. Although I unfortunately expected to be personally slandered and ridiculed as a public servant, I did not expect to see individuals attacking my wife when they have, nor to see the significance of the impact of these attacks on her and our family. Mainly for this reason, it became necessary to “take a break,” he wrote.

“We are in the midst of a constitutional crisis of epic proportions and there is much to do! The day may come when I will return to the public arena. Until then, however, I plan to maintain a strong voice for freedom. and freedom and remain engaged in the battle to ensure electoral integrity, medical freedom and the protection of families.I will also continue to teach the importance of our Constitution and the need to uphold constitutional principles through [sic] presentations statewide, as I have done for the past six months. “

He also announced his retirement from his employment with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, stating, “I do not wish to infer that my views represent those of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. “.

“So I think it is best to withdraw from the Church to avoid potential misunderstandings. I think this will help the Church to preserve its long-standing position of political neutrality in party politics,” a- he writes. “The decision to leave Church employment is up to me. I appreciate the support I felt for my desire to serve as an elected official. I have never been pressured to vote in one way or another.

Rep. Christiansen sparked controversy recently when he called for an audit of the 2020 elections, acknowledging to the Utah State Legislature’s Interim Judicial Committee that it had no evidence of fraud. He recently suggested he would introduce legislation to make changes to Utah’s successful mail-in voting system and has also faced pushback to Capitol Hill for anti-abortion bills he executed.

In a statement, the House majority caucus said “we wish him the best in his future endeavors.” A spokesperson for President Wilson said he had no further comment on Representative Christiansen’s resignation. The Salt Lake County Republican Party will choose a replacement.

The Utah Democratic Party condemned the attacks on Representative Christiansen’s family, but said it was happy he was gone.

Utah Democrats unequivocally condemn attacks on the families of elected officials. However, Representative Christiansen has made a name for himself in our state and nationally as a peddler of dangerous conspiracy theories. By aligning closely with the insurgents who sought to destroy our system of government and our way of life, Representative Christiansen endangered our state, our nation and our democratic ideals, ”the party said in a statement Thursday evening.

“His loss of the legislature is a victory and a gain for democracy, our common sense of patriotism and for our nation as a whole. The fewer elected like Christiansen in legislatures nationwide, the more our children. are safe from a future of authoritarianism. “

Representative Christiansen is the second lawmaker to resign this week. House Majority Leader Francis Gibson, R-Mapleton, announced his resignation citing work pressures and a desire to spend more time with his family.

Read Representative Christiansen’s full resignation letter here:

Utah House GOP Caucus


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Salt lake city

UTA On Demand is coming to Salt Lake City


Map: UTA

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, October 28, 2021 (Gephardt Daily) – The Utah Transit Authority announced Thursday that the UTA On Demand microtransit service is arriving in Salt Lake City.

The service will launch on December 13 in the western neighborhoods of Salt Lake City, serving Rose Park, Poplar Grove, Fairpark and Glendale.

“This innovative form of on-demand transportation uses app-based technology to plan trips and match multiple passengers heading in a similar direction in a single vehicle, with a route that allows for quick and efficient shared trips,” said said a press release from UTA.

“Originally launched in southern Salt Lake County two years ago, UTA On Demand is growing in popularity by offering a variety of trips to local destinations within the community, connecting with d ‘other bus and train services and providing first and last mile transport solutions. “

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall said, “This exciting new service is a welcome addition to public transportation for our city’s Westside community. This pilot program combines the convenience of on-demand service with the affordability of public transit in a way that will greatly benefit our residents. I am so happy that there will be additional transportation that the residents of Westside can rely on for travel, shopping, entertainment and more.

Service to Salt Lake City will be available seven days a week, 4:00 a.m. to 12:15 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Sunday. Runners can book travel by downloading the UTA On Demand app, available on the App Store or Google Play. Travel must begin and end in the designated service area. After booking a trip, the app displays the pick-up location. UTA On Demand is a corner-to-corner service, so passengers are picked up and dropped off near their point of departure and arrival. Cyclists who do not have a cell phone can plan trips by calling 385-217-8191.

UTA On Demand is also accessible to people with disabilities. Passengers using a mobility aid can request a ride from an accessible van by selecting wheelchair accessibility in their profile. Once activated, all trips will be reserved for an accessible vehicle.

“We are delighted to partner with Salt Lake City to launch another UTA On Demand service,” said Carlton Christensen, Chairman of the Board of UTA. “This service will truly benefit residents of the western part of Salt Lake City with increased mobility, connections to our other transit services, and access to their local community. We appreciate Salt Lake City’s support and vision for innovative transit solutions.

Passengers can pay for their journeys in the UTA On Demand application using a credit or debit card, a FAREPAY card or pass such as Eco Pass or Ed Pass linked to your account. These cards can be added in the app. They can also pay with a valid UTA paper or mobile ticket. Cash is not accepted for UTA On Demand travel.

For more information on UTA On Demand and the new service in Salt Lake City, click here.


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Salt lake city

Will the new TRAX station solve an unprecedented problem for Salt Lake City International Airport?


Trains come and go as officials gather to celebrate the Utah Transit Authority’s TRAX Airport Station, marking the culmination of 20 months of construction extending TRAX to the new airport terminal in Salt Lake City Monday. (Scott G Winterton, Deseret News)

Estimated reading time: 6-7 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY – Earlier this month, during the Utah school system’s fall recess, staff at Salt Lake International Airport encountered an issue they had not addressed since the the new airport terminal opened last year.

All airport parking lots have been taken. Its parking lot was completely full because of nearly 30,000 travelers coming to catch the plane elsewhere.

“It is a bit disturbing because it means that it is quite likely that there were people driving to the airport, bags in the trunk, tickets in hand, who could not find a place. to park, ”said Bill Wyatt, manager of Salt Lake City. International airport.

While he maintains that airport executives like him will work on parking management in the future, he used this recent example to emphasize the importance of another solution: public transit. In particular, a new tram station.

On Monday, Wyatt, Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall and leaders of the Utah Transit Authority welcomed the opening of the new TRAX station at Salt Lake City Airport. They did this by boarding a special Green Line tram that arrived just outside the main terminal at the airport. The train was supposed to pierce a specially designed banner to symbolize an inauguration ceremony, but high winds tore the banner to shreds before the train arrived.

Time could not stop the celebration; it marked the end of 20 months of construction that were delayed due to economic and pandemic issues. City, airport and UTA leaders say the station will be a convenient alternative to driving to the airport, much like the old airport station did for the old one. Salt Lake City airport.

“It’s an exciting day for us,” Mendenhall said. “The way we move people matters. The way you move when you go on a business trip, when you take your family on vacation, and how you see and experience this place has so much to do with the beginning and the end. the end of your commute from home, and the opening of this TRAX (station) is changing the fabric of the experience of Salt Lake City and all of Utah today.

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall, Carlton Christensen, chairman of the board of the Utah Transit Authority, and Bill Wyatt, executive director of <a class=Salt Lake City International Airport, and other officials alight from a train as they gather to celebrate the new UTA TRAX Airport Station, marking the culmination of 20 months of construction extending TRAX to the new airport terminal, in Salt Lake City on Monday, October 25, 2021.”/>
Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall, Carlton Christensen, chairman of the board of the Utah Transit Authority, and Bill Wyatt, executive director of Salt Lake City International Airport, and other officials alight from a train as they gather to celebrate the new UTA TRAX Airport Station, marking the culmination of 20 months of construction extending TRAX to the new airport terminal in Salt Lake City on Monday, October 25, 2021 (Photo: Scott G Winterton, Deseret News)

Kaitlin Eskelson, president of Visit Salt Lake, said the resort is not only exciting for Utahns heading to the airport for travel. She said the resort’s “ease of access” is one of its main selling points for people coming to Salt Lake City for travel. It only takes 20 minutes to get from the airport train station to the City Creek Center station in downtown Salt Lake City.

Visits to Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County, heavily driven by people entering the state from the airport, play a key role in Utah’s tourism economy. In 2019, before COVID-19, tourism brought in more than $ 10 billion. Salt Lake County accounted for almost half of business and leisure visits.

As the Salt Lake City airport begins to move closer to pre-COVID-19 passenger numbers – levels that fill its parking lot – and business conventions slowly return to downtown Salt Lake City, Eskelson is optimistic that tourism spending numbers will return to normal soon. This is facilitated by the presence of a light rail station just outside the airport which can take people directly into the city. From there, those looking to get to Utah ski resorts can use other UTA services or other means of transportation.

“(Less minutes) they can spend getting to or from the airport, they can spend more time on the runways and more time in our communities,” she said.

Nancy Volmer, spokesperson for the airport, added that the train station and the normal green line service are also invaluable for the nearly thousands of employees who travel to and from the airport just for work.

The airport’s first station opened in April 2013 as part of an extension of what was then the new green TRAX line connecting Salt Lake City International Airport to West Valley City, passing through the center. -City of Salt Lake City. Carlton Christensen, chairman of the UTA board, said there have been 2.7 million trips to the airport since the line opened.

The Green Line has connection points to the Red Line, which goes to the University of Utah and the Daybreak District in southern Jordan, and the Blue Line, which connects downtown Salt Lake City to Drape. There is also a connection point with UTA’s FrontRunner, which is a commuter train service that connects Ogden to Provo. All of this is in addition to the many bus stations that connect several other routes through Salt Lake County.

Construction on the new airport station began in March 2020. Christensen said the line was extended by 1,500 feet. The whole project cost $ 22 million, which was obtained through local funding.


Hopefully we’ll see a slight uptick now that people know it’ll be a little more convenient – or maybe a lot more convenient – just to jump on the green line and hike it all the way here.

–Carl Arky, Utah Transit Authority spokesperson


The new airport station itself may seem familiar to those who used TRAX to get to the old airport. That’s because materials from the old station have been moved to the new location, according to UTA spokesperson Carl Arky. He said recycling the items saved both time and money. The project was originally slated for completion in July, but COVID-19 issues and concrete supply shortages delayed the project for a few more months.

Until Monday, passengers could take the green TRAX line to the airport, but had to take a bus to the terminal. The bus also took passengers from the terminal to the green line; however, the process has resulted in delays ranging from a few minutes to an hour in some cases.

It is not clear whether these delays resulted in a drop in ridership on the Green Line. UTA has seen a massive drop in ridership system-wide since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, which hit Utah in mid-March 2020. While ridership is still significantly lower at pre-pandemic levels, the agency reported an increase in ridership during recent times.

UTA reports that it made an average of 33,704 weekday boardings in September, up 54% from the previous September, but still 45% below the September 2019 averages. In addition, the agency continues report new post-pandemic monthly records. September 2021 also marked the first time UTA has returned to 30,000 or more runners on weekdays since April 2020.

“Hopefully we’ll see a slight uptick now that people know it will be a little more convenient – or maybe a lot more convenient – just to jump on the green line and hike it this far,” Arky said. . “It just takes time.”

Carlton Christensen, chairman of the board of the Utah Transit Authority, speaks as officials gather to celebrate the new TRAX airport station, marking the culmination of 20 months of construction extending TRAX to the new airport terminal, in Salt <a class=Lake City on Monday, October 25, 2021.”/>
Carlton Christensen, chairman of the board of the Utah Transit Authority, speaks as officials gather to celebrate the new TRAX airport station, marking the culmination of 20 months of construction extending TRAX to the new airport terminal, in Salt Lake City on Monday, October 25, 2021 (Photo: Scott G Winterton, Deseret News)

As ridership continues to increase, UTA is looking for ways to help it grow further. Christensen said UTA will extend Sunday service at the airport from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. starting December 12. This is a return to the hours of service that existed before the pandemic.

He added that the agency was also preparing to launch an incentive that will allow travelers with a “current day” boarding pass to travel for free on TRAX in an effort to encourage people to use the service.

Meanwhile, Arky said he thinks it is “critical” that the project be completed before the next vacation travel season and as air travel increases.

“This airport is already attracting more and more traffic. So I think more and more people are going out and starting to travel again and we are getting closer to vacations, and Salt Lake City and the metro area continues to grow organically as we go. and as we go, I think every mode of transportation we can offer that offers a better solution… wouldn’t be fast enough, ”he said.“ It’s great that we have done this now. We have seen nothing but continued growth and continued use of the airport. “

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Salt lake city

Family remembers Salt Lake City woman killed in police chase


SALT LAKE CITY – The family of a woman killed in a high-speed police chase find it difficult to understand why this tragedy happened.

Thy Vu Mims died when the car she was driving was bypassed by a driver trying to get away from North Salt Lake police on Saturday.

Investigators said officers began chasing the suspected drunk driver in North Salt Lake and the chase continued in the Rose Park neighborhood of Salt Lake City, where the collision took place.

Read – Suspect arrested in fatal SLC crash that killed passerby

“It shouldn’t have happened,” said Tripp Mims, Thy’s husband. “Absolutely, it shouldn’t have happened.”

As Tripp tries to deal with the senseless accident that took his wife’s life, the Salt Lake City Police Department is the outside agency investigating the case as an officer involved in a critical incident.

While the crash occurred in Salt Lake City, SLCPD officers were not involved in the pursuit. The lawsuit involves the North Salt Lake Police Department.

The results of the investigation will be reviewed by the Salt Lake County District Attorney.

Thy Vu Mims is survived by her husband, her two children, members of her family, friends and neighbors whom she touched by his kindness.

“It’s just an absolute loss,” Tripp said. “The future looks so different.”

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Tripp and Thy started a baking business that allowed Thy to connect with the community.

“I’ve always joked with her, ‘you might think of yourself as the bread lady who sells bread, but in these pop-ups people come talking to you and the bread is secondary,” said Tripp.

His death left a void in many lives.

“Healing is a lifelong process and it will always be there,” said Tripp.

He plans to continue the family bakery business to remember Thy and shine his light in the community.

“She was so inclusive, I have to emulate it all for her,” he said. “Every article I prepare will be for you.”


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Salt lake city government

COMCAST JOINS COMMUNITY LEADERS TO MARK 10 YEARS OF INTERNET ESSENTIALS


Over the past 10 years, Comcast has connected more than 160,000 people in Utah to low-cost, high-speed home Internet

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – News Direct – Comcast Utah

Along with top Utah executives, Comcast executives announced their expansion efforts to help low-income Utah residents access the internet and increase digital equity.

“Utah is one of the most collaborative states we work with across the country when it comes to helping its citizens achieve digital equity,” said JD Keller, senior vice president, Comcast Mountain West Region. “State, county and city leaders are working together to open more free Wi-Fi lift zones, connect more families to the internet at home, and increase speeds for businesses and families across the country. ‘State. “

The announcement is part of Project UP, Comcast’s global initiative to advance digital equity and help build a future of limitless possibilities; and coincides with the 10th anniversary of its Internet Essentials program, which has connected a cumulative total of more than 10 million people to the Internet at home, most for the very first time. Comcast’s expanded eligibility for Internet Essentials, which now includes all federal Pell grant recipients in its service area, will allow even more students to stay connected while continuing their education at colleges, universities and schools techniques.

Comcast’s top priorities are connecting people to the Internet at home, equipping secure spaces with free Wi-Fi, and working with a strong network of community nonprofits, city leaders and government officials. business partners to create opportunities for low-income Americans.

“We are thrilled to be working with such exceptional business partners, such as Comcast, as we connect more Utahns to the Internet,” said Utah Governor Spencer J. Cox. “Utah is regularly praised for its innovative vision in many categories, and increasing our digital access helps everyone, including families, students and businesses. “

Salt Lake County is responsible for launching unique digital equity initiatives to connect its community.

“We have one of the most forward-thinking counties in the country and having such a strong partnership with leaders in government and community organizations means we can connect hubs faster and more securely for everyone involved. Salt Lake County Mayor Jenny Wilson said. . “We are committed to digital equity. Our Salt Lake County libraries have over 300 hotspots and 150 Chromebooks in circulation to help residents with digital needs in their homes.

“As a national technology leader, Comcast dramatically advances Salt Lake County’s efforts to support economic prosperity in every region of the county. “

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall said the county’s collaboration with Salt Lake City provides continuity between communities in their efforts to bridge the digital divide.

“We only benefit as a community when we embrace technology and make sure we have the fastest, most reliable internet services available,” Mendenhall said. “Bridging the digital divide and providing lift zones enables students and families to excel in the way they need to compete in today’s rapidly changing environment. “

As the nation’s largest internet provider, Comcast supports cooperation between communities, businesses, and nonprofits to improve digital equity.

“By working with communities across America, we know Utah is remarkable with a vibrant attitude and extraordinary collaboration with amazing community partners,” Keller said. “Together, we have been able to connect tens of thousands of Utahns to the power of the Internet at home and the endless possibilities, education, growth and discovery it offers. Today, we are dedicated to that mission once again to ensure that Utah’s next generation of students have the tools, resources, and capabilities to succeed in an increasingly digital world.

In 2021 alone, Comcast estimates that students across America will take more than 25 million hours of distance learning courses to further fill the “homework void” in the hundreds of Lift Zone sites that already have open or soon to open.

Comcast’s $ 1 billion pledge will include investments in several critical areas, including: additional support for the Lift Zone initiative, which establishes secure, WiFi-connected spaces in 35 Utah community centers and more than 1 000 community centers nationwide for students and adults by the end of 2021 .; donation of new laptops and computers; over $ 100,000 in digital equity grants for local community nonprofit organizations in Utah to create opportunities for low-income Utah residents – especially in media, technology and the entrepreneurship; and continued investment in the company’s Internet Essentials program.

“Comcast’s investment in the future of Utah’s digital connectivity is remarkable,” Governor Cox said. “Helping bridge the digital divide so that everyone has access to the Internet in Utah is essential. “

To increase digital access and reliability, Comcast provided a financial grant to the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Salt Lake, whose mission is to inspire and empower young people to realize their full potential as productive citizens. , responsible and caring.

“We are very grateful for this timely grant from Comcast,” said Amanda Ree Hughes, President and CEO of the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Salt Lake. “Comcast is a 360 partner because it gives more than money for computers and programs. Their employees bring skills, experience and knowledge to create a complete solution by providing access and technology to help our children succeed.

To help bridge Utah’s digital divide, Comcast is donating computers and laptops to Neighborhood House so individuals and families can access the Internet where they don’t have it.

“We are thrilled with our partnership with Comcast as we work with customers who don’t have much access to technology,” said Jennifer Nuttall, Executive Director of Neighborhood House. “Comcast has been an amazing partner in getting us online, and now that they donate 300 computers and laptops to our customers and to help our programs, it’s really phenomenal.

“It changes the lives of families. Being able to access technology for children in school and for parents with work and their children’s educational needs is essential.

“Whenever we can help our neighbors in the community connect to reliable high-speed Internet access, we are working to do it,” Keller said. “It helps us all move forward, one family, one organization and one community at a time. “

Project UP & Comcast’s $ 1 billion commitment to advance digital equity:

For more than a decade, connecting more people to the internet and the technology they need to participate and excel in an increasingly digital world has been at the heart of the business. Looking to the next decade, Comcast is building on that foundation and expanding its impact through Project UP, a global initiative to advance digital equity and help build a future of limitless possibilities. Backed by a $ 1 billion commitment to reach 50 million people, Project UP encompasses community programs and partnerships across Comcast, NBCUniversal and Sky that connect people to the Internet, advance economic mobility, and open doors to next generation of innovators, entrepreneurs and storytellers. , and creators. For more information on Project UP and the latest news on efforts to tackle digital inequalities, including the recent expansion of the Comcast RISE investment fund to provide millions in grants to small business owners of color and To invest in research to increase diversity in technology and digital fields, visit https://corporate.comcast.com/impact/project-up.

About Comcast Corporation

Comcast Corporation (Nasdaq: CMCSA) is a global media and technology company that connects people at important times. We are primarily focused on broadband, aggregation and streaming with over 56 million customer relationships in the US and Europe. We provide broadband, wireless and video services through our Xfinity, Comcast Business and Sky brands; create, distribute and stream premier entertainment, sports and news through Universal Filmed Entertainment Group, Universal Studio Group, Sky Studios, NBC and Telemundo broadcast networks, multiple cable networks, Peacock, NBCUniversal News Group, NBC Sports, Sky News and Air Sports; and deliver memorable experiences at Universal Parks and Resorts in the United States and Asia. Visit www.comcastcorporation.com for more information.

About Comcast Business

Comcast Business offers Ethernet, Internet, Wi-Fi, voice, television, and managed enterprise solutions to help organizations of all sizes transform their businesses. Powered by an advanced network and backed by 24/7 customer support, Comcast Business is a major contributor to the growth of Comcast Cable. Comcast Business is the country’s largest cable operator for small and medium-sized businesses and has established itself as a force in the corporate market; recognized over the past two years by major industry associations as one of the fastest growing Ethernet service providers. For more information, call 866-429-3085. Follow us on Twitter @ComcastBusiness and on other social networks at http://business.comcast.com/social.

About Effectv

Effectv, the advertising sales division of Comcast Cable, helps local, regional and national advertisers use the best of digital with the power of television to grow their businesses. It provides multi-screen marketing solutions to make advertising campaigns more effective and easier to execute. Based in New York with offices across the country, Effectv operates in 66 markets with more than 30 million homes with video service. For more information, visit www.effectv.com.

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Knight Deneiva

+1 520-345-9792

[email protected]

Company Website

https://utah.comcast.com/

See the source version on newsdirect.com: https://newsdirect.com/news/comcast-joins-community-leaders-to-mark-10-years-of-internet-essentials-885445347


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Salt lake city

Squid Stewart | Private detective | Salt lake city


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If you look Squid game on Netflix – and who isn’t? – then you know that the titular game is organized and played by people who are clearly more sinister than the rest. Squid game reveals that some people are deceptively sinister, while others are simply cautiously sinister. Other characters are terribly good people but always resort to being less than themselves if the situation deserves it. In such situations, these people resort to cheating, greed, betrayal, lies, theft, intimidation, bowing, evil, murder and cowardice.

Only a handful of Squid game the characters embrace virtuous human traits. Even fewer evoke warmth or sympathy. Most of the characters in Squid game pretty much sums up almost all the bad traits of the human race. That doesn’t even count the despicable sadists who run and oversee the squid game itself out of complicity, greed, or overgrown egos. Eventually, these evil groups are eliminated from the game until only the original 456 participants remain the luckiest, most twisted, least loved, and most ambitious.

There could only be one character who was the worst of the worst, the lowest of the lowest, the most accomplice of accomplices, the most brazen of cowards. I’m not normally the type to spoil the end of a good movie or drama, so just say when Squid game is reduced to defining the most sinister of all of its characters, it’s not an easy choice given all the options. However, the price of the worst Squid game the character, bar none, is the most loathsome of all: Representative Chris Stewart.

Yes, this Chris. The guy who represents my gerrymandered neighborhood of Salt Lake City in the US House of Representatives. The former Air Force kid. This is also the scope of his curriculum vitae.

He’s the squid player who has been in the public for his entire adult life, taking full advantage of all the social benefits offered by our government, but who wants to keep socialism for his greedy little self. He’s also the guy who shamelessly takes a stand on almost nothing important but follows with the obedience of a border collie. He’s known for flip-flopping on all subjects, and he’s also known to speak harshly but never support him. He’s the guy who “inadvertently” blurted out – through a side door – disruptive members of his party in the first round of Donald Trump’s impeachment hearings.

I’m pretty sure Stewart wouldn’t last until the end in a real squid game – he’d be eaten alive by Cho Sang-Woo or Jang Deo-Su. However, in real life he is like them. Note his most recent act of spineless deception last week, when he announced on Facebook – so Chris from himself – that he was boycotting the Utah Jazz because of a policy that only people willing to prove vaccination against COVID-19 would be allowed to watch games. in Vivint Arena.

There has been a lot of things written and said about Stewart over the past week that I don’t need to accumulate on, but it’s a bit weary for a man who has never worked for or managed a private company in his life to stand so high against one. The Utah Jazz have every right to set rules of behavior in their arena, just as the church that Stewart attends sets rules for entry into its temples.

Considering the vitriol that stole its way after her announcement, you’d think Stewart could’ve gotten the message out, but that’s not the game. Squid game is the game. Stewart knows he wasn’t speaking to the healthiest faction in Utah’s health community, nor to most Utah Jazz fans – he was bending to his base.

I am only a gerrymandered fraction of his district. He won’t suffer a lot of wasted votes tearing up the Utah Jazz, who play non-Squid games in his neighborhood. Real city dwellers support the city center. Quite simple. It makes you wonder, then, what exactly matters to Chris Stewart, in relation to the COVID pandemic, and does he care about anyone in his district? Of course, of course, he was vaccinated and, also, he claims to encourage people to “get bitten” as they say in Sevier County. He encourages moderately, however, and certainly not in such a deliberate way that it has any effect.

You know that’s true because while Stewart boldly defends his personal freedoms in that gray mass at 301 S. West Temple, Sevier County’s “anti-jabbers” make up Utah’s second county for deaths from COVID per 100,000, at 116 (according to the latest update from The New York Times coronavirus tracker). The full vaccination rate in Sevier County is 34%. Looks like those Fish Lake in Sevier lunkers are safe for another year – I’m boycotting!

As COVID knows no borders, and as COVID now flourishes in rural America, it’s no surprise that other counties in the Stewart District dominate the Top 10 cases per 100,000, hospitalizations per 100 000 and the least vaccinated county category, with eight of Stewart’s constituents. counties among the 10 lowest vaccinated in Utah. Juab County is only 29% vaccinated (the Utah state average is 52%). Gently supporting vaccinations on Facebook while speaking out loud on meaningless boycotts is a Squid game cunning. He doesn’t care who dies until it’s him.

And yes, they are dying. Utah has four congressional districts with roughly equal populations within each. But the Stewart District (giving it a third of Salt Lake County and half of Juab County) accounts for about 37% of Utah’s COVID deaths, far from the cynical 25% betting line. Maybe he can Facebook a note of sympathy to the five COVID deaths reported in his district today (Tuesday, October 5, 2021).

Stewart kills him. He would be a master at Squid game. CW

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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City School District Reports Lowest COVID-19 Case Rate Among Area Schools


SALT LAKE CITY – Schools in the Salt Lake City School District reported the lowest rate of COVID-19 cases among area schools in the first 40 days of the new school year, according to Dr. Angela Dunn.

The executive director of the Salt Lake County Department of Health shared the data on Twitter Tuesday afternoon.

The graph showed 963 positive cases of the virus in SLCSD elementary schools, compared to 1,518 in the Jordan School District.

For middle and high schools, data showed 750 cases of COVID-19 in the SLCSD and 1,199 in the Granite School District.

Dunn went on to say: “In the first 49 days of school, 33 children under the age of 18 were hospitalized due to COVID-19[female[feminine in Salt Lake County – 19 out of 33 are between the ages of 5 and 17.

On September 15, the Salt Lake County Council extended a mask term for Kindergarten to Grade 12 students in the district, first issued by city mayor Erin Mendenhall on August 20. It is expected to expire in mid-October when city council may decide to extend yet again.

The Salt Lake Teachers Association supported the extension.

Dunn called for a Salt Lake County mask mandate in August, but the county council rejected it, overturning it. The council voted 6-3, along party lines, to override Dunn’s public health order.

Dunn was the Utah epidemiologist until she moved to her post in the county.



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Salt lake city government

State school mask bans tangled with budget plans and controversy


AP covers complex legal movements in Arizona over school mask bans and the state budget. The Detroit Free Press covers similar maneuvers in Michigan. Separately, reports state that the Department of Education will cover the salaries of members of Broward County school boards withheld due to school mask rules.

AP: Arizona High Court allows upholding of school mask ban

The Arizona Supreme Court on Wednesday refused to immediately reinstate a series of new laws that include measures that prevent schools from requiring masks and remove the power of local governments to impose COVID-19 restrictions. The High Court rejected the request of the Attorney General of the Republic, Mark Brnovich, to allow the entry into force of the provisions of three state budget bills and one entire budget bill. Instead, the court set a briefing schedule for it to consider Brnovich’s request to bypass the Court of Appeal and hear the case directly. (Christie, 9/29)

Detroit Free Press: Whitmer: Budget coins canceling local mask orders unconstitutional

Michigan lawmakers cannot use the state budget to threaten funding for local health departments that institute local school mask rules, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said in a letter to lawmakers on Wednesday. The governor considers this pandemic provision in the nearly $ 70 billion budget unconstitutional and therefore unenforceable. “Lawmakers cannot roll out the public health code into a budget bill or inappropriate funds because they challenge the actions of local health departments,” Whitmer wrote in the letter. (Boucher, 9/29)

WLRN 91.3 FM: Federal government covers Broward school board salaries that state withheld due to mask policy

The US Department of Education announced Tuesday that it is awarding more than $ 420,000 to the Broward County School Board to cover state financial penalties on the salaries of school board members. The grant is intended to pay the salaries of eight Broward board members who voted for a student mask term that allows exceptions only for medical reasons during the COVID-19 pandemic. (9/29)

Salt Lake Tribune: Here’s where the masks have gone that Utah officials promised schools in Salt Lake City County

To help keep Utah’s children “as safe as possible” from COVID-19, Governor Spencer Cox in August pledged to provide more than a million masks to students in Kindergarten to Grade 12, at the Both surgical style masks and higher quality KN95 masks in small and large sizes. As of Tuesday, 2.2 million masks had been shipped to schools, according to Tom Hudachko, spokesman for the Utah Department of Health. Of these, 310,000 were pediatric-sized fabric masks, 700,000 were pediatric-sized three-layer surgical masks and the rest were KN95s, he said. But low demand for the masks means some Salt Lake County school districts have left them in storage. “I would say that every day, on average, throughout the building, about a quarter of my children wear masks,” John Paul Sorensen, director of Neil Armstrong Academy in West Valley City, said Tuesday. (Jacobs, 9/29

In updates on quarantines and vaccines –

AP: Louisiana school chief removes COVID quarantine suggestion

Going against health advice, the Louisiana Department of Education announced on Wednesday that it no longer recommends that public school systems quarantine asymptomatic students who have come in close contact with a person who tests positive. for COVID-19. Louisiana’s 69 local school districts already had the opportunity to determine whether they wanted to send students home for days due to exposure to the coronavirus disease. But most districts had followed the state’s education department’s recommendation that these students should be quarantined, even if they did not show symptoms of COVID-19. (Deslatte, 9/29)

The Charlotte Observer: Union County’s New COVID Quarantine Agreement with Schools

After threats of legal action, the Union County Public School District has agreed to work with the county health department to ensure that COVID-19 contact tracing steps and quarantine requirements are followed. The Union County Public Health Department and Union County Public Schools agreed on Wednesday on a process to identify and exclude students and staff identified as a positive case or close contact of a person who tested positive for COVID-19. (Costa, 9/29)

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Illinois teachers sue districts over statewide immunization warrant

Ten teachers in the eastern metropolitan area who refuse to comply with statewide vaccine and mask mandates are suing their school districts over the policies. The lawsuit against Triad, in Troy, and the Edwardsville school districts and their superintendents indicates that the warrants were issued illegally. The Madison County Circuit Court lawsuit calls for teachers to be allowed to continue working in their schools. School districts “do not have the delegated authority to mandate vaccination or testing,” said lawyer Thomas DeVore of Greenville. “They could have defended their educators… but they don’t want to face the governor. “(Bernhard, 9/29)

AP: University of Colorado faces COVID religious exemption lawsuit

A pediatrician and a medical student at the University of Colorado medical campus at Anschutz are contesting denials of their requests for religious exemptions from the school’s COVID vaccination mandate, arguing in a lawsuit filed Wednesday that administrators are ruling ” truth ”of personal religious beliefs in violation of the First Amendment. The U.S. District Court lawsuit filed by the Thomas More Society, a Chicago-based conservative nonprofit, is the latest clash over a growing number of private and public sector vaccine mandates across national government to stem the spread of the coronavirus, which has killed more than 600,000 people in the United States (Nieberg, 9/30)

In other school news –

The Washington Post: School nutrition programs face new crisis as supply chain disruptions and labor shortages limit food deliveries

Square pizza and chicken fillets are suddenly swapped for pieces of meatloaf and zucchini. American school children and lunch ladies make faces. And now the federal government is stepping in to help. Kansas school districts cannot get whole wheat flour, ranch dressing, or Crispitos taco rolls at this time. In Dallas, they can’t get their hands on cutlery, plates, and napkins. In New York City, school districts are unable to find chicken, condiments or carrots without antibiotics. (Reiley, 9/29)

This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of coverage of health policies by major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.


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Salt lake city

Federal appeals court urged re-trial over SLC police shooting


SALT LAKE CITY – A federal appeals court has been asked to revive a lawsuit filed by the family of a man shot dead by a Salt Lake City police officer.

In recent arguments at the 10th U.S. Court of Appeals in Denver, attorneys for Patrick Harmon Sr.’s estate urged a three-judge panel to reinstate the trial which was overturned by a federal judge in the United States. ‘Utah.

The judge “wrongly determined that Mr. Harmon posed a serious threat,” argued Harmon family attorney Nicholas Lutz.

Harmony was arrested by police while cycling on State Street in 2017. Officers discovered Harmon had a warrant for his arrest. While handcuffed, Harmon broke free. What happened next is the subject of the family’s trial.

Police claimed Harmon had a knife and threatened officers when he was shot several times. The Harmon family maintains that while a weapon was found nearby, body camera footage did not show him holding it.

Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill found shooting legally justified. The shooting was among those cited in Black Lives Matter’s protests against police brutality last year.

The Harmon family sued the Salt Lake City Police and Officer Clinton Fox, alleging racial bias (Harmon is black and the officer is white), excessive force and a violation of Harmon’s constitutional rights by the police. A judge dismissed part of the lawsuit, ruling that what the officers had done was “legally, objectively reasonable”, but also allowing certain allegations of racial prejudice to go forward in state court.

The Harmon family asked the 10th Circuit Court to restart the trial and have it decided by a jury.

“The inevitable inference from these allegations is that Mr. Harmon did not pose a serious and immediate threat to the officers at the time he was killed,” Lutz told the judges.

The police body camera video was a key part of the arguments, with Lutz and Katherine Nichol, the Salt Lake City lawyer, drawing the judges’ attention to it.

“When I saw the video they never ordered him to drop anything and the only audible statement was the officer shouting ‘I’m going to shoot you’,” Judge Keith Kelly said at the ‘hearing.

“That’s right, your honor. It was the only order, as you may call it, that was given to Mr. Harmon,” Lutz replied.

But the Salt Lake City attorney argued that judges should consider what a “reasonable officer” would do in the circumstances.

“Officer Fox was faced with circumstances in which, during an arrest for a second degree felony, Mr. Harmon begged officers to let him go,” Nichol said. “He then freed himself while in handcuffs, he pushed an officer to the ground as he was running away, then he stopped running and turned back to the officers with what appeared to be reasonable and was, in fact, a knife. “

Throughout the 30 or so minutes of argument, the judges appeared somewhat skeptical of some of Salt Lake City’s arguments.

“Even if he pushed it, I grant you. Three officers, one guy on a bike. They fight. They don’t tell him to drop anything. I couldn’t see anything in it. the video. and he says I’m going to shoot you, and he does. Is this standard operating procedure in Salt Lake? “asked Judge Kelly.

“No, your honor,” replied Nichol. “The Court’s investigation covers all of the circumstances, as the Court is well aware.”

The 10th circuit court took the case under advisement without delay for the time when it could rule.


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Utah economy

What if you wait to buy a house? Interest rates could change drastically

All aspiring homeowners in Utah are asking the same question: When will house prices drop?

Unfortunately, no one can predict exactly when this will happen or if it will happen. In the meantime, there may be one more important question home buyers should ask themselves: What if you wait to buy a home?

While it is tempting to wait for prices to cool down, there is another risk associated with postponing a buying decision. Bankrate reports that today’s interest rates remain low, but that “[m]all mortgage experts expect rates to climb above 3.5% by the end of 2021. ”

So what if interest rates rise while house prices fall? How do these numbers compare?

While a loan officer can help you answer this question based on your particular situation, here is a general overview of how interest rates can affect home prices. (You might be surprised by the results.)

An overview of the impact of different interest rates on homebuyers

To show you how even a slight increase in interest rates can affect the price of your home over time, consider the following hypothetical examples.

Suppose you qualify for a $ 400,000 home purchase with 5% down payment and your loan amount is $ 380,000. 10 years of 3% interest costs you $ 54,814.51.

Now watch what happens when you increase the interest rate from 1% to 4%. If you were eligible for a payment of around $ 1,600, you could now only spend $ 353,000 with a loan amount of $ 335,350 and pay $ 65,037.52 in interest over 10 years.

And if the interest rate goes up an additional 5%, a cheaper home is even more expensive. You could now only afford to buy a house for $ 314,000 with a mortgage of $ 298,300. Again, the payment would be the same and the loan would cost $ 72,846.60 in interest over 10 years.

It is simply by increasing the interest rate by 2% between the $ 400,000 house and the $ 314,000 house. The interest is considerably higher on the much lower loan amount and the payments are roughly the same. You can see how easily things can add up over the life of your loan, even if you originally bought a cheaper home.

Essentially, a 1% rise in interest rates is equivalent to a more than 10% drop in house prices. Over the past 20 years, even during the recession, prices have not fallen 10% in a calendar year in Salt Lake County. Ultimately, it can cost you more if interest rates rise than what you could potentially save while waiting for prices to drop.

What if you wait to buy a house?  Interest rates could change drastically
Photo: Shutterstock

Why interest rates could rise in 2022

While no one can pinpoint when and if interest rates will rise over the next few months, there are several factors that could cause interest rates to rise in 2022.

Currently, the hottest topic impacting mortgage rates is pending inflation. There are many opinions about how quickly mortgage rates will be adjusted to fight inflation, but most people agree that inflation is a fast approaching challenge.

Another thing that has an impact on mortgage rates is the Federal Reserve. To keep the housing market stable and stimulate the economy, the Federal Reserve will often buy mortgage bonds. If they choose to cut back on these purchases, interest rates will likely rise.

According to Investopedia, “The Federal Reserve aims to maintain economic stability and has an impact on bank lending rates. When the Fed wants to stimulate the economy, it usually becomes cheaper to take out a mortgage. And when the Fed wants to crack down on the economy, it acts to drain money from the system, which means borrowers will likely pay a higher interest rate on mortgages. “

The strength of the economy also plays a role in mortgage interest rates. When GDP and employment increase, it is a sign of a growing economy, which means more people with purchasing power. This creates greater demand for real estate. Since lenders have a limited amount of money to lend, they increase the rate so that they can lend more mortgages to more borrowers in the future.

The housing market has a similar impact on mortgage rates as the growing demand for real estate means growing demand for mortgages.

There are many other things that affect interest rates, but these are the things that are currently in the spotlight and why many believe rates will go up.

Benefit from lower interest rates

While no one knows exactly what the future holds, taking advantage of today’s lower rates seems like a good option for homebuyers who may be on the fence. Since Bankrate lists Utah’s housing market as the hottest in the country, it could be some time before prices start to fall. Locking in a good interest rate can be your best chance to save thousands or tens of thousands of dollars when buying your home.

To help you determine the best options for your situation, the Stern team is here to guide you through every step of the home buying process. For more information, call 801-788-4049 or visit sternteam.com today. If you have questions about financing, contact Mandi Henriod with Intercap Lending at 801-638-1005.

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Salt lake city government

Residents of southern Utah share their thoughts with the two redistribution groups


Over the past two weekends, residents of southern Utah were able to share their thoughts on the decade-long redistribution process.

They did so in public hearings held by the two state-funded Utah redistribution groups. One is the traditional Legislative Redistribution Committee, a group of 20 state lawmakers – 15 Republicans and five Democrats – this is the group that has made final redistribution recommendations to the state legislature in the past and will make final recommendations to the legislature for this redistribution to deal with.

The other group, the Independent Redistribution Commission, is a seven-member group of commissioners, three of whom were chosen by the Democrats and one by three by the Republicans, with President Rex Facer chosen by the governor. This group is in its first year after being created in 2018 thanks to a proposed vote supported by voters.

These two groups are working on “parallel tracks” and will each produce a set of maps according to State Senator Scott Sandall, Republican and co-chair of the legislative committee. The Independent Commission works as an advisory group to the Legislative Committee and the two groups are not in competition, according to former congressman Rob Bishop who is commissioner of the Independent Commission.

The Independent Commission stopped in Washington on September 17 and the Legislative Committee was in St. George on Saturday. Both meetings allowed the groups to explain the parameters of the process and hear how to divide urban and rural Utah.

There have been statewide hearings for the redistribution, many of which are available to stream online, on September 24, 2021.

At the start of the Legislative Committee hearing, Senator Don Ipson read a letter from the Mayor of St. George Michele Randall, in which the mayor advocated keeping St. George in the 2nd Congressional District, represented by Representative Chris Stewart.

Randall cited Stewart’s knowledge of the area and the needs of the district.

The two residents of southern Utah, Senator Don Ipson and Representative Brad Last, sit on the legislative committee on September 24, 2021.

Several other political leaders in southern Utah also made public comments, including state officials (right) Travis Seegmiller, (right) Walt Brooks and newly elected Washington County commissioner (right) Adam Snow. The mayor of Enterprise also spoke and their comments focused on how southwest Utah has different issues than the rest of the state and needs unique representation.

All spoke about the growth of the state and how rural areas can be lost in the reshuffle, advocating for rural communities to be demarcated so that their voices are heard in Congress and the State House. .

“We want to make sure that the rural component is heard and that the representation is there often, we are swept under the carpet,” said Enterprise Mayor Brandon Humphries. “If we don’t have enough political votes, we kind of get lost in the paperwork.”

Seegmiller, who represents the 62nd district which covers Washington City and other areas, said creating districts along current municipal / county lines is a good way to draw these maps.

“It helps people in this community come together and feel like they have someone representing them,” Seegmiller said.

Representative Travis Seegmiller speaking on the issue of equitable representation of rural communities, September 24, 2021.

The Legislative Committee and Independent Commission groups will create samples of the four new district maps needed, one for the 75 State House of Representatives districts, 29 State Senate districts, 15 council districts state school and four districts for congressional districts. .

The redistribution process is guided by the “one person, one voice” ideology, where each district should have a relatively similar population size. In Utah, there are higher standards for congressional districts because they should be as close to the same size as possible, allowing only a 0.1% gap between population sizes. For Utah, each of the four congressional districts should have about 817,000 to 818,000 people, and the ideal size is 817,904.

For other district maps, the difference is larger at 5%. This means that a senate district can have 107,000 to 118,000 inhabitants, a house district can have 41,000 to 45,000, and a school board district can have 207,000 to 229,000 inhabitants.

State Senator (right) Scott Sandall, co-chair of the legislative committee, said the public was most interested in talking about congressional districts. And that there have been two philosophies of how to divide Utah into four congressional districts.

“A set of philosophy that says ‘75% of the people live on the Wasatch front, so they should have three congressional districts,’” Sandall said. “That other mindset that says’ just a minute of listening, we’re better off if we have a built-in system. [with both rural and urban Utah] seat of Congress because then we have four votes.

Legislative Committee Co-Chairs, Reps Paul Ray and Scott Sandall, meet with the public in a redistribution hearing on September 24, 2021.

Others involved in state politics, such as Democratic State Senator Derek Kitchen, have advocated that urban and rural Utah should have different representation because these areas have different interests. He says that when communities of interest are not kept together, their voices are diluted in the legislative process.

“Our focus shouldn’t be on one party over another, our focus should be on the people who live in those communities, it’s not about dividing rural Utah,” Kitchen said. “If you have better boundaries, you have better… representation. “

The current set of Congressional Districts of Utah divides Utah’s most populous county, Salt Lake County, with a population of over one million, into three districts. With the 2nd Congressional District comprising parts of northern Salt Lake County and all of Washington County.

Sandall says the legislative committee is always looking to marry these two philosophies, and the committee is focused on creating maps with more districts such as the District 75 House of Representatives map because it takes longer. The committee will focus on congressional maps at the end of the redistribution period towards the end of October, Sandall said.

Snow addressed this in his public comment on behalf of the County Commission, said they would prefer congressional districts to share urban and rural populations, and advocated for Stewart, Snow’s former boss.

“If we can put a stop to Washington County… we strongly want Congressman Stewart because they already understand the issues,” Snow said.

Washington County Commissioner Adam Snow said the state should combine urban and rural Utah in congressional districts so that the state can have a combined voice in Washington DC

Local resident Jeffrey Allen said the redistribution should be non-partisan and didn’t like local political leaders like Snow and Randall supporting sitting Congressman Stewart, saying it was “wrong” to do so. to do. Allen also pleaded for the Independent Commission cards to be taken seriously.

Both groups told residents that the districts created by redrawing the voting district maps should have a predetermined ideal population size, compact, contiguous, and hold the community of interest together. The groups wanted residents’ input on how to keep the communities of interest together.

This was discussed at length during the less-attended Independent Commission hearing in Washington City on Friday. In Sahearing, the commissioners shared that they have a mandate to keep communities of interest together, but that there is no standard definition of what a community of interest is.

The Chairman of the Independent Commission, Rex Facer, said that community of interest is a “term of art”, but that a number of factors such as economic, social, religious, linguistic, local, ethnic, industrial and environmental can bind a community. .

“It all seems very arbitrary, which is why you have to tell us what you want,” said Llye Hillard, commissioner of the Independent Commission.

Both groups always seek feedback from the public and encourage people to try and create maps on each group’s website. But time is limited for public input, as the Independent Commission is due to make final recommendations by November 1, and the state legislature will begin discussions on new district maps by November 9.

Sean Hemmersmeier covers local government, growth and development in Southwest Utah. Follow on twitter @ seanhemmers34. Our work depends on the subscribers, so if you want more coverage on these issues, you can subscribe here at thespectrum.com/subscribe.


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Salt lake city government

COVID-19 vaccines for children: what parents need to know


Children as young as 5 years old could be vaccinated against COVID-19 by Halloween, now that Pfizer and BioTech report that lower doses of their vaccine have been shown to be safe while producing a “robust” antibody response in this group of people. ‘age.

The results announced by the companies earlier this week are yet to be submitted to the United States Food and Drug Administration, which will decide whether to change the emergency use order allowing teens ages 12 to 15 years to receive the vaccine to include children aged 5 to 11. .

While the data shared so far appears to be good news for parents concerned about protecting their young children from the deadly virus, experts are waiting to see details of the latest clinical trial that involved some 2,300 children aged 5 to 11. years.

“A press release is just a press release, and we want to see the rest of the data. But I hope that happens very soon, and I hope that a good close review of the data set will be just as encouraging as what they published in the press release, ”said Dr Andy Pavia to journalists in a recent virtual news. conference.

Pavia, chief of the division of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Utah Health and director of hospital epidemiology at Intermountain Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City, said “this is really the point at which we can. say, “Yeah, that sounds awesome.” We are delighted to give it to our children.

How serious is COVID-19 for children?

Lately, there are typically eight to 10 children hospitalized in elementary school for children with COVID-19, Pavia said, “far more than we’ve seen at any time in the past year. I think this reflects both the spread among children that we are seeing this year and the increased infectivity of delta, ”the highly contagious viral variant.

School-aged children also account for about 1 in 4 new cases of the virus in Utah during the current outbreak, he said, a number likely higher because many parents do not test their children for the virus because that they are worried. having to prevent them from going to school.

There have been nearly 60,000 cases of the virus in Utahns aged 14 and under, representing 12% of all cases in the state, according to the Utah Department of Health. Nearly 500 have been sick enough to be hospitalized and two young people in Salt Lake County have died of the disease, including an unvaccinated teenager.

What parents should do

Deciding whether to vaccinate children against COVID-19 means assessing the risks involved, Pavie said. Children get sick enough to be hospitalized or die, but even in the mildest cases they miss school and face the possibility of dealing with what is known as the long COVID-19 – fatigue, fog and other persistent symptoms.

“You have to balance these risks, which people don’t always fully appreciate,” he said, with the potential risks of injections which, so far, “have been shown to be as safe as any vaccine like us. let’s use “. But Pavia said that in children aged 5 to 11, the study was not large enough to know what he called rarer side effects.

This information will come as the vaccine rolls out to the younger group, he said, adding that if his own children were 5 to 11, they would be on the front line for vaccines on day one. where they were available – if they had not already been enrolled in a clinical trial.

“What I would say is if your child goes to school in Utah, he’s at a pretty high risk of contracting COVID and a pretty high risk of complications,” Pavia warned. However, he said, “if they stay home, if they are in a state where there is universal masking and very low infection rates, their risk is lower.”

For low-risk children, the doctor said parents “might want to wait a little longer until we know more about rare or minor safety effects.” The best source of information for parents, Pavia said, is a family pediatrician or other health care provider.

The bottom line for him, however, is that the risk presented by COVID-19 is great while the risk of the vaccine “is almost certainly much, much smaller.”

Will the vaccine really be available by Halloween?

Dr Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and chief medical adviser to President Joe Biden, said there was a good chance the injections would be approved for children before they were go to therapy.

FDA officials pledged earlier this month to “carefully, thoroughly, and independently review the data to assess the benefits and risks and be ready to complete its review as quickly as possible, possibly within a few minutes. weeks rather than a few months ”.

But in the same statement, Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting commissioner of the FDA, and Dr. Peter Marks, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Assessment and Research, also said, “Like every vaccine decision that we took during this pandemic, our assessment of data on COVID-19 vaccine use in children will not cut corners. “

Pavie said that in the past, similar decisions were made within weeks of submitting the application, so late October or early November could be the date when clearance could be anticipated. But he also admitted that it was only a matter of “looking at a crystal ball”.

After FDA approval, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is to meet to develop clinical recommendations. It usually only takes a day or two.

And once the federal government gives the green light, Pavia said he expects injections to be given to children in the same places as teens, teens and adults, including doctors’ offices. , clinics and pharmacies.

Parents planning ahead for the holidays should realize that it takes five weeks from the first dose to be fully immunized. In addition to the three week wait between the two injections, it takes another two weeks after receiving the final dose before a person is considered fully immune to the virus.

How the vaccine was tested

The trial tested two doses of the vaccine given 21 days apart, the same regimen currently given to people 12 years of age and older, but the doses were one-third less than the standard 30 micrograms. However, the immune response generated seemed to be equivalent to larger doses in adolescents.

That’s all the companies had to show since vaccines had been shown to be effective in stopping COVID-19 infections in studies in older groups, including one trial in 44,000 adults, USA Today reported. Trials are currently underway for children 2 to 5 years old and 6 months to 2 years old.

Pfizer and BioTech said the children involved in the studies of the three age groups came from more than 90 locations in the United States, Finland, Poland and Spain, and some had already had COVID-19, according to USA Today .

The other two coronavirus vaccines approved for use in the United States, the two-dose Moderna and the single-dose Johnson & Johnson, are also under study in children. Pfizer’s injections are the only COVID-19 vaccine approved for adolescents and adolescents,

What about “off-label” clichés for children under 12 now?

This question arose last month, when the Pfizer vaccine was fully approved by the FDA, paving the way for prescribing “off-label” injections for different age groups, conditions or other indications than those stated by the manufacturers. authorities.

But experts say it’s not a good idea and have advised to wait until federal authorities have approved the safety concerns and looked into issues such as the proper dosage for young children. Pfizer shots are available under emergency use authorization for ages 12 to 16.

Utah Department of Health on COVID-19 Vaccines for Children

“There is a common misconception that children do not contract COVID-19 or are not at risk of serious illness from the virus. However, some children get sick enough to require hospital treatment. We still don’t know much about how COVID-19 will continue to impact children in the long term, ”the department said in a statement.

“COVID-19 is far more dangerous than any potential risk involved in getting a vaccine. Children suffer from serious and potentially long-lasting side effects at rates similar to those of adults, even if they have never had symptoms or had only mild symptoms at the time of their infection. Many children continue to suffer from fatigue, headaches, abdominal, muscle and joint pain, and difficulty remembering and processing information, ”the statement continued.

“The Utah Department of Health is eagerly awaiting further recommendations from the FDA and CDC to vaccinate children under 12 years of age. If you have young children, talk to your healthcare professional about the best ways to protect them until a vaccine is available.


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Salt lake city government

Salt Lake allocates $ 8 million to tackle housing crisis and increase affordable housing


Ana Valdemoros, chair of the board of directors of the Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency, speaks at a press conference Tuesday announcing a notice of funding availability for affordable housing development in the city. (Shafkat Anowar, Deseret News)

SALT LAKE CITY – The Salt Lake City redevelopment agency on Tuesday released $ 8 million for the construction and preservation of affordable housing projects. The city continues to experience growing economic inequality as housing rates rise faster than the incomes of residents.

“This is the commitment we are showing with the resources we have to provide solutions to this statewide housing crisis that we are experiencing, it may not be the complete solution, but it is the most that anyone has done, “Ana Valdemoros, president of the board of directors of the GDR and a city councilor, said at a press conference on Tuesday. “I really appreciate the other members of council, the mayor and the staff, for focusing on the resources we have and dispersing them so that we can at least make a dent for the residents of Salt Lake City.”

The $ 8 million will be allocated under the GDR Housing Development Loan Program. A portion of this funding, $ 2.7 million, is spent on projects located in what are considered “high potential areas”. These areas are places in Salt Lake City that are believed to provide conditions that will expand an individual’s possibilities for social mobility.

These high opportunity areas are identified using indicators such as homeownership rate, poverty, household financial burden, education level, unemployment rate and labor market participation. work, according to the director of the GDR, Danny Walz. The agency is made up of the seven members of the Salt Lake City council, with Mayor Erin Mendenhall as executive director.

Applicants must develop and plan a project that meets the city’s affordable housing goals to be eligible for funding. Some of the city’s goals include:

  • Residential units targeted at underserved populations
  • Accommodation for families
  • Housing for affordable home ownership
  • Equitable access to a variety of transportation options
  • Equitable geographic distribution of affordable housing
  • Long-term affordability.

“It’s not just the money that’s going to help us make geographic equity more possible in our city, when it comes to affordability, and that’s why that’s so important. whatever the gap for the current owners, ”Mendenhall said.

<a class=Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall speaks at a press conference Tuesday announcing a notice of funding availability for affordable housing development in the city.”/>
Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall speaks at a press conference Tuesday announcing a notice of funding availability for affordable housing development in the city. (Photo: Shafkat Anowar, Deseret News)

The City’s goals demonstrate a variety of needs that residents face during the affordable housing crisis.

The federal government defines affordable housing as any housing unit whose gross monthly costs, including utilities, do not represent more than 30% of a household’s gross monthly income. But state data has revealed that more than 183,000 low-income households pay more than half of their income for rent and move closer to homelessness with deteriorating economic conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This same data showed that from 2009 to 2016, incomes grew by 0.31% per year, while rents increased at a rate of 1.03% per year in 2017. In addition, the recent population growth of cities like Salt Lake City led to a concentrated increase. required. For example, the average rent for an apartment in Salt Lake County was $ 647 in 2000, but the average monthly payment rose to $ 1,153 in 2018, according to an analysis by the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute of the University of Utah.

Unaffordable housing leaves residents with less money to pay for food, utilities, transportation to work, health and child care, among other expenses. Mendenhall said the city takes these elements into account when allocating funds, noting that 90% of housing units built in Salt Lake City since 2019 are within walking distance of public transportation, helping to keep costs down. transport which represent on average 20% of the expenses of a resident. total income.

Part of this housing growth includes 333 affordable units, funded in part by the RDA, which were added in the past year. According to Valdemoros, 181 more units are expected to come online by the end of this calendar year, with more than three-quarters of these rented at affordable rates for those earning 60% or less of the region’s median income.

These units may look like “micro-units” seen in newer developments like the Mya, located at 447 South Blair Street. Property manager Alicia Anderson said the building offers different units with varying rates depending on applicants’ incomes. The building has market-priced units, which allows “a mix of different demographics and different incomes and makes people feel like they live in any other building.”

But Valdemoros said the focus should not be on micro-units, but on a variety of housing that meets a complex need. The council member pointed out that residents find it difficult to accommodate a growing family in smaller homes.

“We hear churches, we hear schools, we hear neighbors say, ‘Hey, you know I’m having a second child – I don’t think I can live in the city anymore. “It’s hard for me to hear as a board member because I always thought I wanted everyone to live, work and play in Salt Lake City,” said Valdemoros.

Developers can attend a virtual meeting hosted by the Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency on Friday, September 24 at 11 a.m. to receive an overview of the application, requirements, and selection process. For more information or to attend the meeting, visit slc.rda.com.

A list of Utah housing resources is available at https://www.hud.gov/states/utah/renting. In Salt Lake County, affordable housing resources are available at https://housingconnect.org.

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Salt lake city

$ 80,000 stolen from retail program + fatal shooting deemed justified


Happy Monday, people of Salt Lake City! Here’s everything you need to know that’s happening locally today.


Are you a local business owner or a merchant in Salt Lake City? Our premium local sponsorships keep you on top of inboxes in town every morning. Contact us here for the truth.


First of all, the weather forecast for the day:

Clear all day. High: 63 Low: 45.


Here are today’s best stories in Salt Lake City:

  1. A West Valley City the man was arrested for carrying out an organized retail crime scheme and was found with over $ 80,000 in stolen retail goods. The Utah Attorney General‘s Office‘s The Economic Crimes Unit, CASE (Crimes Against Statewide Economy) identified the suspect as 45 years old Oscar Martinez. Martinez allegedly had people with drug addiction steal the merchandise on his behalf, and then paid them a fraction of what he would earn by selling them back. (ABC 4)
  2. Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill ruled on the fatal shooting of Rezek Yaqub Yahya by officers of the Salt Lake City Police Department as justified. The shooting took place on the morning of June 10 in Pioneer park To 300 W. 300 South. Police were called to the scene shortly after 8:30 a.m. after reporting that a man, later identified as Yahya, 39, stabbed a woman in the park. (KUTV 2News)
  3. Around 100 protesters waving American flags and holding placards denouncing masks and vaccination warrants gathered along the sidewalk of 700 East in Liberty Park Saturday. (Salt Lake City Tribune)
  4. After issuing a money alert on Friday for a local woman with dementia, Salt lake city police have since found her and canceled the alert. (fox13now.com)
  5. The opening of a new community of luxury apartments, Town Attics, was announced; the remainder of the development plan includes an increase in residential, office and retail space for the Large salt lake Region. (ABC 4)

Today in Salt Lake City:

  • Hatch Center Webinar: Protecting American Institutions, A Civic Education Discussion – Salt Lake Chamber (10:30 a.m.)

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You are now in the know and ready to go out this Monday! See you tomorrow for another update. If you like these newsletters, consider bringing friends and neighbors with you. You can send them this link to subscribe.

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About me: Sean Peek is a writer and entrepreneur who graduated in English Literature from Weber State University. Over the years, he has worked as a copywriter, editor, SEO specialist and marketing manager for various digital media companies. He is currently the co-owner and operator of the content creation agency Lightning Media Partners.


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Utah economy

AG investigators destroy major retail theft case

WEST VALLEY CITY – The Utah Attorney General’s Office (Crimes Against Statewide Economy) CASE unit has arrested a West Valley City man who was profiting from the resale of large quantities of stolen goods to local big box retailers. Officers recovered more than $ 80,000 in brand new power tools, household items and sports equipment intended for illegal sale.

Photos of the seized goods: Here

And here.

And here.

Oscar Martinez, 45, has been charged with Possession of Stolen Property; 3 counts of illegal acquisition of stolen property and money laundering.

Organized theft in retail is one of the most serious challenges facing retailers this year. Across the country, people load shopping carts with expensive goods and simply steal them. It is estimated that millions of dollars in goods are lost every month across the country. The proceeds are typically sold in online marketplaces, with the money typically used to fund drug addiction.

Martinez would have arranged for drug addicts to steal the goods for him. Agents say he would provide shopping lists for the items at retailers, including Home Depot, then pay a fraction of the value, then resell them online for a profit. They say this illegal operation has been going on for over a year.

“Organized retail crime is a very serious problem in Utah, and it is also a national trend,” said CASE Commander Christopher Walden. “It has become an epidemic and is driving up the costs of these items so that stores can cover their losses. We are committed to continuing to fight these crimes statewide.

CASE is a joint task force between the Utah Attorney General’s Office and the Utah Department of Public Safety, State Office of Investigations. ——

ICAC arrest in Salt Lake County

SALT LAKE COUNTY – Also this week: ICAC officers continued to investigate dozens of tips received regarding citizens distributing child pornography. ICAC officers arrested a man on Wednesday after discovering tens of thousands of cases of child sexual abuse at a residence. Officers also recovered drugs and a gun from the home.

Officers charged Garret Brian Ferrari, 60, with 10 counts of sexual exploitation of a minor. Firearms and drug offenses will be charged separately. On the spot, Ferrari admitted that it has been collecting these files for years, which corroborates the volume of files recovered. ###

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Salt lake city

Pioneer Park Filming Update + Rose Park Redevelopment Meeting


Welcome back, Salt Lake City! Let’s start well this Saturday. Here’s everything you need to know about what’s going on in the city today.


Are you a local business owner or a merchant in Salt Lake City? Our premium local sponsorships keep you on top of inboxes in town every morning. Contact us here for the truth.


First of all, the weather forecast for the day:

Possible light rain in the afternoon. High: 78 Low: 62.


Here are today’s best stories in Salt Lake City:

  1. Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill updated the findings of an investigation into a shooting involving a police officer in Pioneer park who killed one in June. Body camera footage captured the suspect running towards two officers, who can be heard telling the man to put down a knife. The two officers opened fire and shot the suspect. (fox13now.com)
  2. Utah state lawmakers and researchers held a redistribution committee meeting at Rose park, where citizens were able to submit their own proposals for cutting plans. 19 of the 20 members of the legislative committee were present to hear the proposals and comments from the public. (Salt Lake City Tribune)
  3. The judge denies 11 Granite School Board demonstrators’ offers to drop charges after disrupting a public meeting, a Class B misdemeanor, in South Salt Lake Court of Justice. (KSL.com)
  4. The Murray Fire Department responded to a gas leak that occurred near 4400 S. 500 West. Energy of Domination crews were at the scene of the gas leak at Murray. (Gephardt Daily)
  5. Antique store House in Sucre is recovering from a heist, in which several unique collectibles were stolen. (fox13now.com)

Today in Salt Lake City:

  • Free Tour of Utah’s First and Only Off-Grid Homesteading Community! (11:00)
  • Free mini family photoshoots in Provo! (9:00 a.m.)
  • 2021 Utah Walk to Defeat ALS – Car Parade Edition (10h00)
  • Utah County Water Lantern Festival (4:30 p.m.)
  • PRESS START: A Nerdlesque Variety Show (7:00 p.m.)

Showcase your local business here in the newsletter for just $ 79 per month. Click here to begin.


That’s all for today! I’ll see you soon. If you resent these newsletters, consider inviting some of your friends and neighbors to read them. You can send them this link to subscribe.

Sean peek

About me: Sean Peek is a writer and entrepreneur who graduated in English Literature from Weber State University. Over the years, he has worked as a copywriter, editor, SEO specialist and marketing director for various digital media companies. He is currently the co-owner and operator of the content creation agency Lightning Media Partners.


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Utah economy

Salt Lake City is one of the biggest winners of the past decade

“IT PROTECTED LINKS behind its mountains of ramparts, sheltered from physical and intellectual storms on both coasts, ”Wallace Stegner wrote of Salt Lake City. The novelist associated his adopted hometown, where he spent much of the 1920s and 1930s, with an “isolationism” and “provincialism” offered by his Mormon heritage and his comfortable seat between the Wasatch Range and the Grand salt lake. These characteristics remain; but gaze at the city’s bustling downtown today from a perch in the nearby foothills and Salt Lake feels far from provincial. There are few places in America that can boast their successes over the past decade more than the City of Saints.

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Utah’s population grew faster than any other state between 2010 and 2020. Salt Lake City has the lowest unemployment rate of any major city, at 2.8%, compared to a national rate of 5 , 2%. If the state has rebounded so well from the slowdown caused by the covid-19 pandemic, it’s thanks to the Wasatch Front, an urban corridor that includes Salt Lake and Provo, home to Brigham Young University. The four counties that make up the Wasatch Front account for at least 80% of Utah’s economic activity, said Juliette Tennert, an economist at the University of Utah.

In many ways, Salt Lake’s success mirrors what is happening in other Mountain West cities, such as Boise, Idaho and Denver, Colorado. What makes Utah so special? For starters, it has the most diverse economy of any state, according to the Hachman Index, which measures each state’s mix of industries relative to that of the nation. In fact, Utah has been in the top two for most of the past two decades, says Tennert. Front Wasatch has a booming technology sector known as “Silicon Slopes”, several research universities and an international airport.

Utah’s ability to attract new business is aided by its Republican zeal for a low corporate tax rate and little regulation. But putting Salt Lake City on the map also required breaking the myths. Gary Herbert, the former governor, considers 2002, when Salt Lake hosted the Olympic Winter Games, to be a pivotal moment. “It was kind of our coming out night,” he says. People realized that “we are not the Wild West here in Utah”.

The researchers also note Utah’s relative homogeneity as a reason for its success. It can be easier for people to get along when they share a religious and cultural background. But the state is changing rapidly. Although about 61% of Utah’s population is a Mormon, that number is dropping all the time. About 48% of Salt Lake County residents identify as Mormons; the city itself, which is more diverse, probably has even fewer. Utah is the youngest state in the country, but its fertility rate is declining faster than the national average, says Emily Harris, a demographer. Attracting and retaining new Utahns will become increasingly important as births decline.

Three things threaten Salt Lake City‘s ability to attract and retain new residents. The first concerns environmental issues. Americans may relocate to Salt Lake for its proximity to hiking trails and fancy ski resorts, but the Wasatch front is plagued with pollution. Smoke from wildfires, heavy traffic and drying lake bed dust dirty the air. Utah is also counting on dwindling reservoirs due to the mega-drought that has dehydrated most of the West.

Second, Salt Lake City is becoming unaffordable for many longtime residents. House prices have risen nearly 25% since August 2020, according to Zillow, an online advertising platform. (Nationwide, home values ​​have increased by almost 18% on average.) Erin Mendenhall, the Democratic mayor of Salt Lake, offers high housing costs as proof that rapid growth does not benefit everyone. world.

Third, Utah consistently ranks among the worst states in the country for gender equality. An annual index from WalletHub, a consumer-oriented website, found the gender pay gap in Utah to be larger than in most other states. Women in Utah are also less likely to graduate from college or be elected to political office. That Utah is so lagging behind is likely due to the enduring influence of the Mormon Church and the tendency of believers to marry young and have large families. Still, the future looks brighter: As the state diversifies and begins to look more like America, women should benefit.

The Utahns are not at all surprised that their condition is booming. “The Salt Lakers generally like to fly under the radar,” says Mendenhall. “Part of who we are in our city is knowing that we are the best kept secret. This may be historically true, but the ever-expanding Front Wasatch suggests the secret is out.

This article appeared in the United States section of the print edition under the headline “Not your Father’s Utah”

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Salt lakes real estate

Discussion FOCUS: Growth in Utah (housing)


SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – According to the US Census Bureau, Utah’s population has grown by 18.4% or 507,731 residents over the past ten years – the fastest rate in the country.

Growth is having a substantial impact on our state with a housing shortage, increased traffic on major roads, more air pollution, increased demand for resources, etc. Over the past week, we have explored how population growth is affecting different regions of our state, with a different theme each evening for our IN FOCUS discussions that include agriculture / open land, transportation, quality of the land. air, water / drought and housing.

Envision Utah reports that Utah is currently facing a housing shortage of between 40,000 and 50,000 units. Their researchers say less than half of our population can afford the median price of a home right now, which essentially means there are firefighters, nurses and teachers who can’t afford to live. in or near the communities they serve. In addition, the organization finds that house prices along the Wasatch Front have risen more than in most parts of the country.

The shortage is mainly caused by a combination of “perfect storm”. Envision says Utah has a higher birth rate than the national average, with children accounting for 65% of our growth. There are currently labor and material shortages. In addition, our geography places constraints on how far we can build due to our mountains and lakes.

There isn’t much land left near our main employment centers and experts say that if we don’t allow more housing in the valley where the jobs are, people will have to drive further to work, which will lead to a loss of housing. increased traffic, air pollution and infrastructure costs. . They say that does not necessarily mean that we have to build apartment buildings everywhere. But ideally, these apartments should be close to jobs, shops and public transport. The researchers also suggest accommodating more units with smaller lots, townhouses, duplexes, basement apartments, etc.

Ari Bruening, President and CEO of Envision Utah joined ABC4’s Rosie Nguyen on CW30 News at 7 p.m. Will have to go a long way to find affordable housing, how we can add more housing without worsening traffic and air quality, and what our housing situation will look like in the coming decades.

Dejan Eskic, senior researcher at the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute, discussed the data on how homes are becoming unaffordable in Utah, how we stack up against the rest of the country when it comes to our home prices, nuances that come with building more housing, what causes housing prices to rise, whether people should wait until homes become more affordable before buying a home, and what are the best practices for keeping housing affordable.

Angela Price, policy director of the Salt Lake City Communities and Neighborhoods Department, explained what the city can do to encourage historic buildings to be reused rather than demolished, how the city is responding to neighborhoods that oppose change for new types of housing, and how the city thinks creatively about housing solutions.

To watch the full IN FOCUS discussion with Bruening, Eskic and Price, click on the video at the top of the article.

Watch IN FOCUS chats with ABC4’s Rosie Nguyen on weeknights on CW30 News at 7 p.m..

Rosie Nguyen is an award-winning reporter who joined the ABC4 News team as a reporter in January 2018. In September 2020, she embarked on a new journey as a presenter of CW30 News at 7pm. Although no longer in the field, she pursues her passion for social justice and community issues through the nightly “In Focus” discussions.


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Salt lake city government

Salt Lake County Government: Tips for Improving Home Air Quality During Wildfires


August 6, 2021

With smoke from wildfires having become more of a concern recently as fires burn in several western states, air quality experts from the Salt Lake County Department of Health warn that even if you are not not in the immediate vicinity of a fire, smoke imported by weather systems can still be a health problem, especially for people with underlying health conditions.

Smoke can enter a home through natural routes such as open doors or windows, mechanical routes such as an HVAC system, or through the infiltration of cracks or small openings in the structure.

The following tips are based on EPA guidelines and may vary depending on your location in relation to a fire, but they are generally among the most effective ways to improve the indoor air quality in your home and protect your health when the outdoor air quality is poor. because of the smoke from forest fires.

Reducing overall exposure to smoke during wildfires is the best thing you can do to protect your lung health. This is especially important for vulnerable populations such as children and the elderly or if you have pre-existing heart or lung disease. For more information, visit epa.gov/smoke-ready-toolbox-wildfires.


This press release was produced by the Salt Lake County Government. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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Salt lake city government

Will masks be mandatory as cases increase? Utah Legislature Has Final Say on COVID-19 Restrictions


SALT LAKE CITY – As the number of cases and hospitalizations for COVID-19 continue to rise, mask warrants are back in a few cities in the western United States.

In Los Angeles and Las Vegas, residents and visitors should wear a mask for indoor events, even if they are vaccinated, to slow the transmission of the delta variant.

But is it likely to return to Utah, or is it even possible?

“I think going back to a mask mandate, or going back to restrictions, is the opposite direction to where we need to go right now,” said Rep. Paul Ray, R-Clearfield.

He told KSL-TV that Utah lawmakers are highly unlikely to ever bring back a mask warrant, even as new cases increase. Ultimately, they have the authority over emergency health orders.

“It comes down to a personal choice,” said Ray. “It’s not the government’s role to do that, especially with the vaccine. You educate people about the benefits of the vaccine. If you want to get vaccinated, you get vaccinated. If you don’t, then you take the risk of coming down with COVID. “

Utah’s COVID-19 emergency orders ended five months ago and the state legislature further restricted how they could be implemented.

So if a city or county in Utah wanted to bring back a mask warrant, could they do so?

“Local Utah health departments have the power to issue mask warrants if they have the support of their elected officials in their jurisdiction,” said Nicholas Rupp, spokesperson for the Salt County Department of Health. Lake.

A county health department executive can issue a new emergency health declaration as a mask warrant as long as local officials, like the mayor and commission, are in favor.


It is not the government’s role to do that, especially with the vaccine. You educate people about the benefits of the vaccine. If you want to get vaccinated, you get vaccinated. If you don’t, then you run the risk of falling with COVID.

-Representative. Paul Ray, R-Clearfield


But according to Evan Vickers, co-sponsor of Senate Bill 195, the legislature can end any order or restriction issued by a health department. So the legislature has that authority in Utah.

Rupp said they would never remove this mask warrant option, but the county health department is currently focusing on vaccine distribution as the most effective tool to fight the pandemic.

“Right now, while we have a vaccine that is still very effective against all of the circulating variants, we are more likely to focus our efforts on promoting this more effective intervention,” Rupp said.

He said masks were a very effective tool in 2020 when there was no vaccine, but at this time Salt Lake County is not likely to re-implement a mask mandate.

“We will focus on vaccination for now, as long as the vaccines continue to be as effective against the variants,” Rupp said.

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Utah economy

Representative Harrison distorts Senator Lee and his laws on public lands

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Senator Mike Lee speaks with delegates attending the 2021 Utah Republican Party organizing convention at the Maverik Center in West Valley City on Saturday, May 1, 2021, as ‘They are returning to an in-person format after the pandemic forced the naming convention to go live last year.

In her editorial on public lands, Salt Lake County Democrat Suzanne Harrison distorts both Senator Lee and his laws on public lands. As an elected official who lives, works and serves the Utahns in a rural area, I am disappointed to see another elected official not only denigrate our US Senator, but distort his legislation, the Protect Utah’s Rural Economy Act.

Representative Harrison’s worn talking points generated by the east coast on public lands are not moot to me. They are real. I have seen, with my own eyes, how the abuse of the Antiquities Law by former presidents has reduced the budgets of our cities and counties, putting enormous stress on our local communities. Almost always, this stress is the result of presidential action occurring without ever consulting those who would be most directly affected by the action.

Utah not only has amazing historical artifacts that we all want to preserve, it is full of amazing scenery. Surely no one wants these landscapes more protected than those of us who live both in and beside these beautiful lands. However, the former presidents closed millions of acres of land – far beyond what the law had ever intended to do – on the simple “recommendation” of interest groups and unelected bureaucrats living in the thousands of people. kilometers away. These lands may be their occasional playground, but they are also our home. Senator Lee understands this, which is why his legislation would require the federal government to simply work with locally elected officials as part of this process. As a local elected official herself, I think Representative Harrison would support a process that solicits input from local elected officials, rather than denigrating our US Senator for creating such a process.

Darin Bushman, Piute County Commissioner, Junction

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Utah economy

AM News Brief: State Revenue Gains, Drinking Water Contaminant, Man Found Incompetent in LDS Church Shooting Trial

Wednesday morning July 14, 2021

state

First data shows revenue gains for the state

Preliminary data shows that the total revenue of the state of Utah increased by more than 30% at the end of fiscal 2021 compared to last year. In a press release, the Utah state legislature said the results included data from the Utah State Tax Commission. Officials said incomes rose more than economists expected, indicating strong economic growth from the COVID-19 pandemic and the economic downturn. The statement added that the impact of federal stimulus measures on the state and individuals throughout the year – and how much that boosted the economy – is still uncertain. He suggested that the infusion of federal funds might have created a one-time support effect that won’t help revenues in the future. Year-end figures are still provisional and subject to final accounting adjustments. – Pamela mccall

Special units to correct conviction errors

Utah passed a law last year allowing prosecutors to create special units to review previous convictions. At least four counties now have them: Salt Lake, Utah, Davis, and Summit. Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said his office had an obligation to correct any mistakes he made in the past. But lawyers in rural counties may find it more difficult to create these teams because there may not be enough lawyers practicing in these areas. Read the full story. – Sonja hutson

Region / Nation

Man found unfit to stand trial in Nevada church shooting

The man charged with a 2018 shooting at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Fallon, Nevada, has been ruled unfit to stand trial. John O’Connor, 51, is said to have killed one man and injured another during Sunday services. The Lahontan Valley News reported a the judge made his decision on Tuesday based on his finding that O’Connor is unable to assist in his defense. O’Connor has been held in a mental institution since September 2018, when a judge made a similar finding. He pleaded not guilty to four counts, including first degree murder. – Associated press

Accomplice sentenced in adoption fraud case

An Arizona woman has been sentenced to two years in prison as part of an illegal adoption program involving a former politician and women from the Marshall Islands. Lynwood Jennet helped submit bogus claims for birth mothers to receive state-funded health coverage under the leadership of Paul Petersen. He’s a Republican who was a Maricopa County assessor for six years and an adoption lawyer. Petersen has pleaded guilty to crimes related to the scheme in three states, including Utah. He was sentenced to one to 15 years in Utah for a human trafficking conviction. – Associated press

The way to regulate drinking water contaminants

This week, the United States Environmental Protection Agency included a new family of chemicals in his latest draft of drinking water contaminants. These are a group of man-made chemicals that stay a very long time, including in the human body. They are also believed to be prevalent in our drinking water. These are called per- and polyfluoroalkylated substances, also known as PFAS. The EPA’s proposal to include PFAS in its list of water contaminants lays the groundwork for potential regulation in the future. But first, the agency proposes to monitor drinking water for some of these chemicals in order to get a better idea of ​​their prevalence. – Maggie Mullen, Mountain West Information Office

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Salt lake city

SLC police spend hundreds of hours a week making calls related to homeless people, public records show


At a time when Salt Lake City’s homeless crisis is at the forefront throughout the city, police spend a lot of time dealing with it.

A 2News public records request found that police are called hundreds of times a week for complaints related to homelessness, passing people, street camping or other related issues.

That’s a big part of an agent’s workload, straining an already short service.

“It takes a pretty big chunk of our available resources,” said Salt Lake City police sergeant. Keith Horrocks said.

Hundreds of hours

Police records show officers answered 147 to 256 calls each week on the matter from November 1 to mid-June. An email from a Salt Lake police captain in March to the mayor’s chief of staff said each service call “consumes at least 2 hours of work.”

Do the math – that means the police spend between 300 and 500 hours per week. And that’s a conservative estimate. In that same March 19 email, Salt Lake City Police Captain Lance VanDongen wrote: “This is exactly what we can prove… many other appeals related to mental health and property crime are related to the same challenge.

This email was written to Rachel Otto, Chief of Staff to Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall, and Erin Litvack, Deputy Mayor of Salt Lake County.

Complaints from a company

Canyon Sports, located at 517 South 200 West in Salt Lake City, is a place where police calls are commonplace.

Employee Kevin Meepos said the outdoor rental equipment store called the police “at least once a day” about concerns about a group of people camping and hanging out in their parking lot and near their home. business.

“They come into our property, harass our customers, shoot drugs, poop on our property, piss on our property, throw stones at our windows,” Meepos said.

While 2News was interviewing Meepos at the store Thursday afternoon, our team saw a man in the parking lot attempting to inject himself with a needle. Meepos said this type of behavior is common.

Canyon Sports complaints are only part of the many calls Salt Lake police receive each week regarding street roaming and camping. When asked if this puts pressure on the department, Horrocks said, “I think everything is kind of a strain in our current predicament.”

This is because the Salt Lake Police Force has dozens of vacancies resulting in slower response times. But, they insist, people who need help should still call them.

“We will respond,” Horrocks said, “and we will deal with the issue you are calling us for as quickly as possible.”

Possible solutions

Andrew Johnston, the new director of homeless policy and outreach in Salt Lake City, is not shocked by the number of calls police are getting about it. He believes that as the city seeks to house 300 people currently on the streets, those calls for service will drop.

“This is fundamentally a housing issue,” said Johnston. “If you can spend the money on housing and focus your energies on housing, we can alleviate this initial crisis we are facing.”

Then there is the question that has been asked in this new era of police reform: all those calls for service that the police should respond to rather than a social worker?

“That’s the question we’re starting to ask ourselves,” Horrocks said. “What should the police respond to? At the present time? It is appropriate that we respond to them.

He said Salt Lake Police have seven social workers and plan to hire 13 more soon. He noted, however, that police will likely always be present when a passenger is called for help because these situations can often become dangerous and unpredictable.

“Until we can find a better solution or a better way to do it, we are the ones who respond,” Horrocks said. “Keep calling us. We will respond and resolve the issue for which you are calling us as quickly as possible.


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Salt lake city government

Fewer pets euthanized in Utah, but rescuers fear the future of some adopted during pandemic


Tiny Tot and Little Bitty are waiting for their adopters to arrive and pick them up from the Best Friends Animal Society in Salt Lake City on Friday, February 26, 2021. Utah has cut its shelters killed by 1,161 in 2020, a 58% reduction from compared to the previous year, which rescuers attribute in large part to the pandemic. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah reduced its shelters killed by 1,161 last year – a 58% reduction from the previous year – making the state the 13th in the country for rescuing the most dogs and cats, according to new data from Best Friends Animal Society.

But animal rescuers fear that some animals adopted during the pandemic may end up at the shelter or be donated as many owners return to their workplaces.

Last year, 44,767 cats and dogs entered shelters. Of these, 39,358 found new homes and 829 were killed for lack of housing, according to the Best Friends Animal Society.

Company spokesperson Temma Martin said that in the first week of the pandemic, many residents “rallied to welcome record numbers.”

The country saw a 90% increase in foster homes as schools, businesses and recreational activities began to close. Many decided it was a good time to adopt because they expected to spend more time at home, Martin said.

“So we saw a huge increase just thanks to Best Friends in the number of foster families and adoptions at the start of the pandemic,” she said.

COVID-19 has also changed how shelters operate, she added. While they quickly closed, many of their animals were placed in foster homes. When a person was interested in adopting an animal, they would virtually meet the animal’s foster family, a counselor, and the animal – a more comfortable and happy environment for the animal to meet a prospective adoptee. This format has led to more adoptions, Martin said.

Shelter organizations always provided all the supplies to foster families, “but it’s great just because the animal lives in a comfortable home environment and shows itself better than in a cage or kennel,” said said Martin.

“A lot of shelters don’t plan to go back to a shelter full of animals and adopt people from there,” she added.

In the United States, there has been a 40% decrease in the number of animals killed or euthanized – a trend rescuers hope not to reverse. In some states, however, reports indicate that pets adopted during the pandemic are being returned at a high rate.

Salt Lake County Animal Services now has 26 dogs in its shelter, up from an average of 10 to 15 at some point before the pandemic, said Randee Lueker, relief and events coordinator. These are dogs that animal services save on the streets because the shelter generally does not accept drops.

At the same time, adoptions from the shelter are on the decline, she said.

The surge in the number of dogs entering shelters does not appear to be a statewide trend more than a year after COVID-19 hit the state, according to Martin.

“It seems to be staying pretty stable, but of course we’re worried. We want to make sure that people, when they return to work, have a plan for their new pets and prepare them for anxiety. separation and also train them, especially if they have a puppy, train them to be good family members so that they don’t now have a one year old dog that doesn’t have good manners to looking after a new home or dealing with new people, ”Martin said.

She said it’s common for people who adopt puppies to face issues as the puppies get older. Some puppies during the pandemic did not receive professional obedience training due to COVID-19 closures.

Martin said it was not too late – families should play ‘catching up’ now to train their dogs if they are unable to do so during the pandemic. She said she had heard of people wanting to relocate their pets now due to behavioral issues, but if the animal hasn’t been trained it will likely create problems for future owners.

The best thing an owner can do in this situation is spay or neuter the dog if he hasn’t already done so, and find some training advice, according to Martin. Virtual training is available through Zoom and other apps, she said. Outdoor classes are also available.

“I know the temptation is there to just find another home for the animal, but if it behaves in a way that is inconvenient for your family, it will probably be inconvenient for the next family as well,” said Martin. . “These animals were there for us during the pandemic at a difficult time to provide us with companionship.… We owe it to them to help them become a good member of the family, and that involves training.”

For those worried about leaving their pets at home when they go to work, Martin noted that many people were doing so long before the start of the pandemic. Owners can train their pets to be alone for short periods of time and then have them work for longer periods. Dogs typically sleep most of the day when they’re alone, Martin said, so it’s possible to work full-time and have a pet to greet you when you get home.

“This is something we want to make sure people are prepared for so that there isn’t a flood of animals being turned into shelters,” Martin said.

Millions of people bought puppies at the start of the pandemic, Martin said, noting that they were not initially refuge animals and did not come with training. If a lot of homeowners decide to abandon them, “it would have a huge impact on the shelters,” she said.

Most dogs at the Salt Lake County Animal Shelter are between 1 and 3 years old, according to Lueker. Almost a third are huskies, several are shepherds and some are working dogs. She said the shelter has seen an increase in the number of dogs with behavioral issues, but workers at the shelter aren’t sure why.

Lueker urges interested residents to consider adopting or fostering a dog from the county shelter. More information can be found at adoptutahpets.org.

About 70% of Utah animal shelters are designated as no-kill shelters, meaning they only kill animals that are not adoptable, whether due to medical or behavioral issues. They also aim to adopt at least 90% of the animals housed at the shelter.

Those who want to help the state reach the threshold set by the No-Kill Initiative Utah can make an impact by choosing to adopt from a shelter or rescue group, spaying or neutering their pets, adopting pets, volunteering and spreading the word about welfare issues -be animal, said Martin.

For areas with higher death rates, this is usually due to cats in the community, she said, encouraging people to find out if their local government supports programs that trap, neuter and return feral cats. in the colonies. If more shelters adopt such programs, it can help prevent hundreds of animal deaths, Martin said.

Utah County is the only county along the Wasatch Front that does not have a “back-to-the-field” program for stray cats.

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Salt lake city

Why are Utah rents so expensive? The latest Utah housing news


Federal officials recently extended the moratorium on evictions by one month – and they warned it would be the last time.

Housing advocates fear wave of evictions will follow moratorium expiration, and urge tenants in Utah affected by COVID-19 pandemic to get help now before it gets too much late.

But for tenants in Utah, the stress of the rental market is nothing new. For almost every year over the past decade, Utah rental prices have kept going up, up, up.

As Utah tenants continue to be in a hurry, when will they hit breaking point?

After a deep dive into Utah’s scorching real estate market, the Deseret News also delved into what’s going on with the state’s rental market – and why rates are likely to continue to climb.

Learn more about what the data shows, the struggles of Utah tenants, and how housing advocates say they can get help here.

Here are five takeaways from the Deseret News report:

The COVID-19 pandemic may have temporarily slowed rental rates, but now they continue to rise.

In the Salt Lake metropolitan area, the median cost of rent rose from $ 1,384 per month in March 2020, when the pandemic first struck here, to $ 1,451 per month a year later, an increase by 4.8%, according to a new report from Stessa .com. The site ranked the Salt Lake City metropolitan area No. 64 out of 105 U.S. cities where rents have changed the most since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The increases drive down the price of tenants who could otherwise have afforded the same rental just a few years ago.

Almost every year for the past decade, Utah rental prices have climbed 5% to 7% per year along the Wasatch Front, a startling reality that means the average Salt Lake County apartment that cost $ 793 in 2008 now costs about $ 1,145. .

Prices climbed at the highest rate in Utah County, home of the Silicon Slopes tech industry.

From 2000 to 2018, rents in Utah County increased 83%, the largest increase in Wasatch Frontal counties.

Salt Lake County rental rates increased 78%. Davis and Weber counties grew 64% and 59%, according to a June 2019 report from the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute.

In Utah County, an average apartment that cost $ 719 per month in 2008 now costs around $ 1,200.

Rents exceed wages and inflation. Low vacancy rates are stimulating the market.

From 2000 to 2018, the average rent in Salt Lake County was more than double the rate of inflation. For example: In 2000, the average rent for an apartment was $ 647. If rent were to keep pace with inflation, the average rent for an apartment in Salt Lake County would be around $ 850 in 2018, almost $ 300 less than the actual 2018 average, according to the June 2019 report from the political institute.

Meanwhile, vacancy rates remain low. In Salt Lake County, vacancy rates fell nearly 9% in 2009 and are hovering around 4.5%, according to a 2020 CBRE Multifamily Market report. Vacancy rates are similar in Utah and Weber counties, and even lower in Davis County, at around 3.5%.

The impact? Thousands of Utahns are in danger. And the housing gap is widening.

An astonishing 1 in 5 Utah renters are considered “severely overcharged,” meaning they pay more than 50% of their income in rent, according to state and federal data.

Utah has approximately 284,935 renters statewide. Of those, 115,875 – about 40% or 2 in 5 Utah renters – are considered “overcharged” or pay more than 30% of their income in rent. According to the 2020 Utah Affordable Housing Report, about 52,890 Utah residents – about 20% or 1 in 5 Utah renters – are considered “severely” overcharged, which means that they pay more than 50% of their income in rent.

A gap in affordable and available rental units for renters earning less than 50% of the region’s median income in Utah has widened over the past decade, from 41,052 in 2010 to 49,545 in 2018, according to the November 2020 report of the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute. .

The waiting lists for housing are enormous. But there is always help.

In Salt Lake City alone, the wait list for the most common help, Section 8 vouchers, is estimated to be five years or less. Currently, there are over 7,000 Salt Lake families on this list, according to the Salt Lake City Housing Authority.

But while those waiting lists are long and daunting, housing advocates want Utah renters to know there is always help for them. Utah has approximately $ 180 million in government funding for tenants affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Learn more about the resources available to tenants here.


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Utah economy

Fewer people of working age can slow the economy. Will it increase wages?

In this May 26, 2021 photo, a sign for workers hangs from a store window along Main Street in Deadwood, SD. is reaching retirement age and thousands of people have died from the coronavirus. (AP Photo / David Zalubowski)

WASHINGTON (AP) – As the U.S. labor market rebounds this summer and the need for workers intensifies, employers likely won’t have a chance to relax anytime soon. Labor shortages are likely to persist for years after the economy quickly reopens in its growing pains.

Consider that the number of people of working age did something last year that it had never done in the history of the country: it went down.

Census Bureau estimates showed that the U.S. population aged 16 to 64 fell 0.1% in 2020 – a slight decline but the first decline of any kind after decades of steady increases. This reflected a sharp drop in immigration, the retirements of the vast baby boom generation and a slowdown in the birth rate. The size of the 16-64 age group has also been shrunk last year by thousands of deaths from the coronavirus.

A year earlier, in 2019, the working-age population had essentially plateaued.

It is not entirely clear how demographic trends will play out once the pandemic is completely over. But even if the working-age population begins to grow again, it will almost certainly do so at an anemic rate. A continued decline in this population, or even a lukewarm increase, would pose a problem for the economy. Healthy economic expansion has always depended on robust population growth to fuel consumer spending, justify business expansion, and boost corporate profits. Without a large influx of new workers, growth could stagnate.

Yet some economists foresee a silver lining for individuals: Fewer working-age people could force companies to be more competitive in hiring and retaining employees. And that could mean higher wages, better opportunities and other incentives to retain and attract workers, a trend already evident in the June jobs report released by the government on Friday. Average hourly wages increased 3.6% from a year ago, faster than the pace before the pandemic.

“The workers would fare better than the economy as a whole,” said Manoj Pradhan, founder of Talking Heads Marco, an economics research firm and former Morgan Stanley economist.

If wages were to rise sharply, it could also help reduce the vast inequality that increasingly separates the wealthiest Americans from the rest and leaves lower-income households struggling to pay rent, food, and child care. children and other essential expenses.

With slow population growth, economic expansion would depend on the ability of companies to make their workers more productive. An increase in productivity, often achieved through investments in labor-saving technologies, could further increase wages. The standard of living would increase even if the economy struggled to grow at what is normally considered a healthy pace.

Last year, the number of legal and unauthorized immigrants entering the United States fell for the fourth year in a row to less than 500,000 – less than half of the 2016 level – according to calculations by William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution. The death toll jumped 8% to more than 3 million, largely reflecting the impact of the pandemic.

A fundamental long-term drag on the working-age population is the exit of the huge baby boom generation from the workforce. The number of people aged 65 and over is likely to increase by 30% over the next decade, Frey said.

“We’ve never really been in this type of situation before,” he said. “There just aren’t enough (of young adults) to replace the people who are leaving.”

The situation has been exacerbated this year by a wave of early retirements. About 2.6 million people who worked before the pandemic now say they are retired and not looking for work, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. Strong increases in stock prices and home values ​​despite the deep pandemic recession have allowed many older Americans to exit the workforce earlier.

One of them is Jeff Ferguson, a physician with Eli Lilly & Co. in Indianapolis, who retired in April at age 59 after 22 years in the business.

Having worked from home during the pandemic, Ferguson said, made the transition easier. But it was also encouraged by its strong investment gains and the strengthening of the local real estate market despite the economic uncertainty.

“I probably retired with a tailwind rather than retiring with a headwind,” he said. “If I had sensed a headwind, I might have delayed it.

The pandemic has also given him a new perspective on life and retirement. Ferguson plans to travel across the country with his wife, a pediatrician, and catch up with loved ones.

Gad Levanon, an economist at the Conference Board, said the decline in the working-age population will be particularly evident among Americans without a college degree. As aging baby boomers retire, they are being replaced by younger workers who are more likely to be university graduates. Blue collar workers – anyone without a four-year degree – will become rarer. This trend is likely to create labor shortages in industries such as manufacturing, construction, retail, restaurants and hotels.

Levanon estimates that the number of university graduates will continue to grow by around 2% per year, despite the population slowdown, while those without a university degree will decline. This could make it more difficult for future college graduates to find jobs that match their level of education. Businesses can also inflate their job demands, perhaps requiring bachelor’s degrees for jobs that previously didn’t require them.

“The number of people willing to work in blue collar and manual service jobs is declining,” Levanon said.

Wages are already rising faster for low-paid workers. For the lowest-paid quarter of workers, hourly wages rose 4.2% in May from a year earlier, according to Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. That’s more than double the percentage increase these workers received in the four years after the Great Recession, from 2010 to 2014, and more than a quarter of the richest workers.

Scott Seaholm, CEO of Universal Metal Products, a 285-person metal stamping company near Cleveland, is surrounded by an aging population and is desperate to get young people interested in a career in manufacturing. A study found that about 59% of the population in Lake County, Ohio, where he is based, was made up of working-age adults in 2015, Seaholm said. This proportion fell to 57% last year and is expected to reach 54% in 2025.

“It’s quite shocking,” he said. “There’s no one there to work. It’s a little ugly.”

More than half of the workers at its three factories are over 55, he said, with less than one in five aged 20 to 34. He has an 81-year-old employee who still works in a punch press.

Seaholm’s company is part of a group that encourages high school students to consider factory jobs. He opens his factories to high school students once a year on “Industry Day” and tries to bring in their parents too.

“They want Johnny and Judy to go to college,” he said. “It’s all locked up in their heads.”

Globally, the workforce in most other countries is aging as well, including China, which once seemed to offer an endless supply of workers. Japan’s population declined for a decade.

Pradhan said this trend could potentially benefit American workers. Since the end of the Cold War in the early 1990s, hundreds of millions of people in China, Eastern Europe and India have joined the global workforce, thus maintaining the wages of less skilled workers and prices under control.

Now the aging of much of the world could reverse these trends, Pradhan and Charles Goodhart, a former economist at the Bank of England, wrote last year in a book called “The Great Demographic Reversal: Aging Societies, Waning Inequality, and an Inflation Resumes. “

Pradhan notes that in Japan, whose population has shrunk by around 1% per year for a decade, economic growth has averaged only 1% per year. But that means the growth per person was 2%.

If the United States could achieve that level of efficiency when its population grew only 0.5% per year, its economy could still grow at a healthy rate of 2.5% per year, Pradhan said.

Yet over time, he and other economists fear that slow population growth means less consumer spending and a less vibrant economy.

“Workers generate innovation and ideas – they invent things,” said Kasey Buckles, professor of economics at the University of Notre Dame. “When you have a shrinking working-age population, you have fewer people doing this.”

__

AP Business Writer Anne D’Innocenzio contributed to this New York report.

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Salt lake city government

Olympian’s company received $ 10 million in pandemic bailout despite conflicting figures


PARK CITY, Utah – Allison Baver had a dream come true when she won an Olympic medal in short track speed skating.

In October 2019, she set her sights on the film and television industry by incorporating her own production company. When the pandemic arrived months later, Baver was among the business owners who sought help from the Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP.

The Small Business Administration reports that the average PPP loan was $ 206,000. Allison Baver Entertainment received the maximum amount of the program – $ 10 million.

Why Baver Entertainment needed so much is unclear. By email, Baver declined to answer FOX 13 questions and said she was not available until the end of July. Neither Baver nor anyone associated with his company has been charged with any crimes.

On social media, Baver recently posted articles saying she was visiting film festivals and filming locations.

According to data released by the Small Business Administration, which administers the PPP, Baver Entertainment said $ 8.6 million in aid was for payroll. The company said it has 430 employees.

But Baver Entertainment was telling the Utah Department of Workforce Services that it has between one and four employees.

The lower numbers would be more typical of a production company, says Marshall Moore, vice president of operations at Utah Film Studios in Park City. Production companies will hire more workers — actors, crew and support staff — when they shoot.

“You’ll get small budgets under a million dollars and sometimes they’ll work with 30 to 50 people,” Moore said. “And then you can go further. “

“Over a million dollars, 5 million to 10 million dollars, sometimes these teams are about 120 people and that includes the producers, the cameramen, the handles, the electricity,” he added.

What would it take to employ more than 400?

“I mean, for me it would be ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’,” Moore said. “It would be Marvel.”

The P3 is often described as a loan, but the loan can be canceled if the recipient maintains their payroll and only uses the money for other approved expenses, including utilities and rent or mortgage. Candidates were supposed to describe the expenses they had in February 2020.

“The purpose of the Paycheque Protection Program was to reduce unemployment,” said Richard Gordon, professor of law at Case Western Reserve University and director of its financial integrity unit.

He says the PPP did not require banks processing applications to verify that the borrower was telling the truth about their employees and their needs.

With the PPP, “the US government is actually the co-signer,” Gordon said. “So if the borrower doesn’t pay the US government back, that is, we, the taxpayer, will eventually pay off the loan.”

Baver is a native of Pennsylvania who moved to Utah to train. She made three Olympic teams. Baver won a bronze medal with a relay team at the 2010 Games.

For the PPP loan, Baver Entertainment turned to Pennsylvania-based Meridian Bank to process its request. The bank’s CEO declined to discuss the app with FOX 13.

Baver Entertainment has production credit this year for a drama starring actor Elijah Wood titled “No Man of God”. IMDB says Baver Entertainment provided funding.

Gordon, who hasn’t researched Baver Entertainment and only talks in general, said PPP can’t be used as capital to grow. He also doesn’t think funding for a film would be allowed under the PPP unless everyone on set is on the recipient’s payroll in February 2020.

“I think Congress could have made this pretty close to the absence of fraud if it was handled by the Internal Revenue Service,” Gordon said.

The IRS “knows our employees. They know exactly how much they are paid because they know how much they are being withheld. Only three other Utah companies have received $ 10 million, according to a Salt Lake Tribune analysis of PPP data. These three were all in business long before Baver Entertainment.

Some more established production companies have received much less from the PPP. The Jim Henson Co. asked for $ 2.3 million and said it has 110 employees.

New Regency Productions, the film company behind films such as “The Revenant,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” and the latest release of “Little Women,” received $ 1 million and reported 50 employees.

In December, Variety attributed to Baver that his upcoming productions included a horror comedy now called “Monsters.” When FOX 13 reached out to the writer-director named in the article, his rep responded by saying that the project had been put on hold when the pandemic arrived and they had heard nothing more.

Baver also told the news site that his company was working on a horror film called “Dead Princess”. Production was halted by the pandemic and is expected to resume this year.

Baver Entertainment’s listed address is the former Olympian’s townhouse in Taylorsville. According to documents filed with the Salt Lake County Recorder, the Baver Homeowners Association filed a notice in January 2020 that the townhouse was behind on its fees; the HOA was planning to sell the property to settle the debt.

In July 2020, about three months after Baver Entertainment received the $ 10 million, the HOA filed a new notice stating that the debt had been paid. The sale was canceled.


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Salt lake city government

Drought issues in dry western US raise fears of July 4th fireworks


SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – Many Americans seeking normalcy as pandemic restrictions end are anxiously awaiting the traditional July 4 fireworks display. But with a historic drought in the western United States and fears of another devastating wildfire season, authorities are canceling exhibits, banning setting off fireworks, or calling for caution.

Fireworks have already caused a few small wildfires, including one started by a child in northern Utah and another in central California. Last year, a pyrotechnic device designed to celebrate a baby’s gender reveal sparked a fire in California that killed a firefighter during a season of wildfires in the United States that burned the second largest land area in nearly 40 years.

Parts of the American West are experiencing their worst drought conditions in more than a century this year, said Jennifer Balch, director of the Earth Lab at the University of Colorado. People setting off fireworks in the home are of concern due to both the powder magazine conditions conducive to wildfire outbreaks and the threat of injury. Last year, injuries hit their highest level in 15 years after the pandemic canceled large gatherings, federal data showed.

“As a fire specialist, I am preparing for this fire season due to the drought and heat already present,” Balch said. “I think the fireworks right now is a terrible idea.”

Fireworks industry professionals, who have also stressed caution in drought-prone areas, expect strong sales despite a shortage caused by pandemic-related manufacturing downturns and disruptions commercial.

“We think we’re going to have a great year,” said James Fuller, a fireworks safety expert at Alabama-based TNT Fireworks.

While fireworks are an integral part of the nation’s Independence Day celebrations, they light thousands of fires a year, including one that burned down Bobbie Uno’s home in Clearfield, Utah, l ‘last year. She had to jump out of the way before it hit the side of her house.

“In five seconds my house, from the bushes to the roof, was on fire,” Uno said. The fire caused $ 60,000 in damage and forced her family out of their home for weeks.

“I want everyone to be aware of the danger because it’s scary even in a little cul-de-sac,” Uno said.

Several Utah cities are banning people from setting off their own fireworks this year during the record drought, but many Republicans are against a statewide ban. Salt Lake County Councilor Aimee Winder Newton supports the restrictions but thinks this year is a bad time for a blanket ban.

“We’re just coming out of this pandemic where people already felt like the government was restraining them in so many ways,” she said. “When you pronounce bans arbitrarily, we might have a situation where people who weren’t going to light fireworks will voluntarily buy fireworks just to send a message to the government.”

State fireworks laws vary widely across the United States, but local bans on personal fireworks are appearing from Montana to Oregon, which has been hit by massive wildfires the last year.

In Arizona, already ravaged by more than a dozen wildfires, many cities have called off their public fireworks displays. The Yavapai-Apache Nation typically holds an exhibit outside of their casino near Camp Verde in central Arizona.

“This year, with worse conditions than last year, we decided in May that we would not have fireworks,” said James Perry, spokesperson for the tribe’s Cliff Castle Casino Hotel. “Based on the large fires currently burning in and around our community, we are happy with our decision. “

It’s a similar story in Colorado, where dozens of shows have been scuttled, most notably in Steamboat Springs, a ski town where firefighters are already scattered around.

“The grass always catches fire… why are we doing something that causes fire when fire is our biggest problem?” Said Winnie DelliQuadri, the city’s special projects manager.

But in neighboring Wyoming, business is booming in fireworks shops, including sales of banned items elsewhere. Parking lots fill up on weekends and many cars have foreign license plates.

“It’s not just Colorado,” said Ben Laws, director of Pyro City. “We see people from Nebraska, we see people from Montana, we see people from all over come and buy.”

Other cities, including Boise, Idaho and Santa Fe, New Mexico, are working to ban personal fireworks while keeping their exhibits public, where safety precautions are often stricter and firefighters are in alert.

In North Dakota, where more than two-thirds of the state experiences extreme or exceptional drought – the two worst categories – some areas are passing local bans. In South Dakota, where conditions are a little less difficult, the governor is fighting the federal government to organize a fireworks display at Mount Rushmore.

A show that draws tens of thousands of people to Lake Tahoe, Nevada, near the California state border, was initially canceled for the second year in a row, but organizers subsequently decided to host an “experience of smaller and safer fireworks “. Holding fireworks over the water is one of the safest ways to celebrate, said Professor Balch.

The industry is urging people who light their own fireworks to follow local restrictions, choose a flat location a safe distance from homes, have a source of water on hand to extinguish used products and dispose of with care.

Some security officials would prefer people to avoid lighting their own fireworks all together. Michele Steinberg of the National Fire Protection Association pointed to federal data showing 15,600 Americans attended emergency rooms with fireworks-related injuries last year, thousands more than the year before.

“I love watching fireworks, but honestly they’re not safe in the hands of consumers,” she said. “Even a sparkler can reach up to 1,200 degrees, which is actually the heat of a forest fire.”

___

Associated Press editors Felicia Fonseca in Flagstaff, Arizona; Mead Gruver in Cheyenne, Wyoming; Cedar Attanasio in Santa Fe, New Mexico; Scott Sonner in Reno, Nevada; and Associated Press / Report for America, Corps member Patty Nieberg in Denver, contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2021. All rights reserved. This website is not intended for users located in the European Economic Area.


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This week’s winners and losers in Utah politics


Hello Utah and TGIF!

Thanks for reading “The Rundown”.

Do you have a tip? Some interesting political gossip? Do you just want to discuss politics? Email me or find me on Twitter @SchottHappens.

Receive this newsletter in your inbox every morning of the week. Sign up for free here.

This Week’s Winners and Losers in Utah Politics

⬆️ Winner: The Utah State School Board. Board members have been battered by the current panic over critical breed theory. Republicans in the Legislature are eager to get involved in the issue. But the board has apparently taken enough action this year against classroom race that lawmakers say they don’t see the need to do anything just yet. But, this respite will be short-lived because there could be several laws next year on the subject.

⬇️ Loser: Representative Chris Stewart. In a controversial interview with CNN’s Chris Cuomo, Chris Stewart falsely claimed he voted to remove Georgian Republican Marjorie Taylor Greene from her committee assignments in February. This claim was not true. The next day, Cuomo and Don Lemon toasted Stewart for not reaching out to correct the record. It wasn’t Stewart’s best hour.

⬇️ Loser: Utah taxpayers. One year ago, the New Yorker reported big issues with TestUtah, the effort to use technology to improve approach to the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, the Salt Lake Tribune reports that the SEC was investigating the co-diagnosis, which provided testing for the effort. In the end, Utah taxpayers spent $ 15 million on testing through TestUtah, far more than any other vendor paid.

Here’s what you need to know for Friday morning

Local News

  • Gov. Spencer Cox expressed frustration Thursday because so many Utahns refuse to be vaccinated against COVID-19, which has resulted in more preventable deaths. Since the vaccines were made available to all Utahns 16 and older, nearly all of the COVID cases in the state have been unvaccinated. [Tribune]

  • Governor Cox explained that he could not ban fireworks in the state despite the extreme fire danger, because it was outside the powers of his governor. The legislature could take such a step, but there doesn’t appear to be the political will to do so, Cox said. [Tribune]

  • Some aligned with the #DezNat group, an online effort to defend the doctrines and practices of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, are deleting their social media accounts for fear they will be identified publicly. [Tribune]

  • Utah County has managed to cut chronic homelessness in half over the past three years. [Tribune]

  • Some owners in Utah require potential renters to pay for DNA testing of their pets. The tests will help them identify who is not cleaning up after their dog or cat when they poop outside. [Tribune]

  • An investment group is turning to technology as a way to help conserve water. [Tribune]

National News

  • A great day at the Supreme Court. The judges rejected another challenge to the Affordable Care Act. [Scotusblog]

  • The court also sided with a faith-based organization, ruling that Philadelphia violated the group’s First Amendment rights when the city stopped working with them when they refused to certify same-sex couples as as potential adoptive parents. [Scotusblog]

  • Both rulings highlighted growing cracks within the court’s conservative wing. [Politico]

  • Unemployment claims jumped unexpectedly last week after several weeks of falling numbers. [WSJ]

  • President Joe Biden signed a bill designating Juneteenth as a federal holiday. [NYT]

  • Schools in the Washington, DC area are closed today for the new June vacation. The last-minute shutdown is pushing parents apart. [WaPo]

  • Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell pledges to block voting rights legislation as it relates to the Senate. [WaPo]

  • The sizzling US economy is driving inflation globally, forcing foreign banks to raise rates in response. [WSJ]

  • The Biden administration will invest $ 3 million to develop antiviral treatments for COVID-19. [CNN]

  • The U.S. Department of Education is forgiving more than $ 500 million in student debt for 18,000 former students of the ITT Technical Institute, which closed in 2016. [AP]

  • 13 Republican members of Congress signed a letter demanding that President Biden undergo a cognitive aptitude test. The group is led by Florida Republican Ronny Jackson, former President Donald Trump’s White House doctor. [MyHighPlains.com]

Utah Politics Podcast

In this week’s episode, we let you listen to a conversation between Rep. Blake Moore and the Salt Lake Tribune Editorial Board.

It’s a fascinating peek behind the curtain as board members engage in a freewheeling chat with Moore that touches public lands, Hill Air Force Base, and investigates the attack on the January 6 against the US Capitol.

You can listen and subscribe for free.

Friday’s Utah News Summary

Utah

  • The United States Court of Appeals rules against citizenship for nationals of American Samoa. [Tribune]

  • The University of Utah, BYU is rolling out name, image and likeness plans as NCAA legislation looms. [Tribune]

  • Deseret Management Corp. appoints director of strategic initiatives and new president of Deseret Digital Media. [DNews]

  • Cox issues a proclamation commemorating June 19 as Juneteenth in Utah. [FOX13]

  • Equality Utah welcomes the Supreme Court ruling that balances religious beliefs with equal protection. [FOX13]

  • 41% of Utah CHIP beneficiaries lost their coverage in May due to a government overthrow. [KSL]

  • BYU-Hawaii will require COVID vaccinations; BYU strongly encourages. [Daily Herald]

COVID-19[feminine

Environnement

  • Le ministère de l’Agriculture a une surveillance faible, des « problèmes de contrôle », constate l’audit. [KSL]

Local government

  • Sunset skid keeps city council optimistic out of poll; the city recorder reprimanded. [Standard Examiner]

  • Former transportation manager selected to fill vacant position on Spanish Fork City Council. [Daily Herald]

  • The still difficult PCMR talks may be coming to a conclusion. [Park Record]

  • Dozens of Utah election officials are participating in the new VOTE certification program. [ABC4]

Infrastructure

  • Experts say Utah is unprepared for large-scale power outages. [KUTV]

  • Boil order issued to Mapleton after bacteria was found in a water source. [FOX13]

  • St. George issues the first energy saving alert. [FOX13]

Housing

  • Can’t keep track of all those new apartments in or coming to Salt Lake County? This card will help you. [Tribune]

  • End of the moratorium on evictions: who to turn to if you run out of rent. [KSL]

  • Ogden City Council is considering an ordinance to ease restrictions on non-residential housing. [Standard Examiner]

On opinion pages

  • Robert Gehrke: Ban fireworks in times of drought and destroy the Utahns that light them. [Tribune]

  • Scott Williams: The governors of Utah have a 50-year legacy of opposing radioactive waste. [Tribune]

  • Tribune Editorial Board: Just get the Utah landmarks back to where they were and get to work. [Tribune]

  • David R. Irvine: We’re not the America we think we are anymore. [Tribune]

  • Richard D. Burbidge: It’s up to you what kind of guinea pig you will be. [Tribune]

  • Steven Collis: Stop asking the Supreme Court to resolve the LGBTQ religious conflict. [Tribune]

🎂 You say it’s your birthday? !!

Happy birthday to Tiffany Gunnerson, spokesperson for the Purposeful Planning Institute, Joel Campbell, associate professor of journalism at BYU, and Eric Peterson, founder of the Utah Investigative Journalism Project.

On Saturday, Thom Carter, energy advisor and executive director of the Office of Energy Development, celebrates.

State Senator Jerry Stevenson and former State Senator Steve Urquhart mark another year on Sunday.

Do you have a birthday that you would like us to recognize in this space? Send us an e-mail.

– Tribune reporter Connor Sanders contributed to this report.



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