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Utah economy

Report: Nevada’s children among the worst affected by pandemic

A new report reveals that children in Nevada suffered more during the pandemic than those in many other states, and that small child welfare gains made before the pandemic may have been reversed.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation’s 2021 Kids Count report found that many Latin and black families in particular were going through a difficult time even before the COVID-19 closures resulted in so many job losses.

Tara Raines, Director of Kids Count Initiatives for the Alliance for the Defense of Children, said Nevada needs to tackle some big issues.

“The report released after the pandemic showed that we were suffering more than the national average on the four key points,” she said, “and it was health insurance, parents with feelings of hopelessness and despair. depression, housing insecurity and food insecurity. “

Using data from 2019, the report ranks Nevada 41st in the United States for child economic well-being and 46th for education. It found that 60% of fourth graders read below grade level and 74% of eighth graders do not have proficiency in math. But those statistics represent a gradual improvement over the 2010 figures. Nevada’s teenage birth rate and the number of adolescents in school have also improved.

The report also contained good news, finding that the US economy had started to recover in March. Leslie Boissiere, vice president of external affairs for the Casey Foundation, said child poverty is set to drop significantly in July – once the money begins to flow from the expanded child tax credit under the plan. American rescue.

“For families with children under the age of 6, it is $ 300 per month that these families will receive,” she said. “So at a time when families are worried about being able to pay their mortgage, or paying their rent or providing food for their families, this is a significant amount.”

The child tax credit expires in December; President Joe Biden has asked for his five-year extension. The report recommended that Congress make income supports permanent for low-income families.

Mary Cashion

The author Mary Cashion