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Utah economy

Utah economy

Report: Nevada’s children among the worst affected by pandemic

A new report reveals that children in Nevada suffered more during the pandemic than those in many other states, and that small child welfare gains made before the pandemic may have been reversed.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation’s 2021 Kids Count report found that many Latin and black families in particular were going through a difficult time even before the COVID-19 closures resulted in so many job losses.

Tara Raines, Director of Kids Count Initiatives for the Alliance for the Defense of Children, said Nevada needs to tackle some big issues.

“The report released after the pandemic showed that we were suffering more than the national average on the four key points,” she said, “and it was health insurance, parents with feelings of hopelessness and despair. depression, housing insecurity and food insecurity. “

Using data from 2019, the report ranks Nevada 41st in the United States for child economic well-being and 46th for education. It found that 60% of fourth graders read below grade level and 74% of eighth graders do not have proficiency in math. But those statistics represent a gradual improvement over the 2010 figures. Nevada’s teenage birth rate and the number of adolescents in school have also improved.

The report also contained good news, finding that the US economy had started to recover in March. Leslie Boissiere, vice president of external affairs for the Casey Foundation, said child poverty is set to drop significantly in July – once the money begins to flow from the expanded child tax credit under the plan. American rescue.

“For families with children under the age of 6, it is $ 300 per month that these families will receive,” she said. “So at a time when families are worried about being able to pay their mortgage, or paying their rent or providing food for their families, this is a significant amount.”

The child tax credit expires in December; President Joe Biden has asked for his five-year extension. The report recommended that Congress make income supports permanent for low-income families.

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Utah economy

Red state takeover fuels GOP fight against Biden spending plans

Businesses, economists and policymakers are divided over whether the policies of conservative governors on unemployment benefits and Covid-19 restrictions – many of them have chosen not to issue any at all. Stay-at-home orders – are actually helping their savings or so industries in their states simply haven’t fallen as far behind during the pandemic.

Yet the patchy recovery and poor job growth reported in April and May gave Republicans ammunition to repudiate Biden’s costly aid plans. They also stoked Conservative concerns that federal aid, particularly the $ 1.9 trillion American rescue plan which passed without GOP support in March – should have focused more on those most in need.

“Overall, the funds could have been used much better by being more focused,” said Rachel Greszler, economist at the Heritage Foundation. Congress should have tied UI to workers’ incomes or allowed states to use federal aid to distribute their own benefits based on labor market needs “in whatever way they thought best suited them.” , she said.

The seven states that chose not to issue a stay-at-home order last year – Arkansas, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming and Utah – were all led by GOP governors.

Republican-led states were also very early to relax trade restrictions in the event of a pandemic and hide mandates: Missouri, Montana, Iowa, and Alaska were among the first states to reduce their trade needs by January and February. Texas, Arizona, Arkansas, New Hampshire and Wyoming followed in March.

Of those states, Montana, New Hampshire, Arkansas, South Dakota, Utah, Missouri and Nebraska returned to pre-pandemic economic activity levels in April and reported lower unemployment. at the national rate of 5.8% in May.

By comparison, states that still have some restrictions on coronaviruses, including California, Connecticut and Hawaii, had the highest unemployment rates in the country in May and were still producing less in April than before the pandemic.

Washington lawmakers sent direct checks to millions of middle- and low-income Americans and supplemented state unemployment benefits with additional weekly payments and coverage for workers traditionally ineligible for unemployment assistance . They also distributed $ 1,000 billion in government guaranteed repayable loans to small businesses under the Paycheck Protection Program, initially on a first come, first served basis.

Other economists wonder if Congress could have maneuvered as precisely as Greszler suggested to save the economy early on, amid a flood of business closures and tens of millions of layoffs caused by health restrictions. pandemic.

“There aren’t a lot of nuances you can use in politics when trying to get the money out as quickly as possible and adapt to local situations for every worker in the state,” said Daniel Zhao. , senior economist. at Glassdoor. “It is very difficult to bring help to all those who need it at the same time, and in a way that is actually targeted at individual situations.

The uneven nature of the recovery partly reflects the diversity of state economies. States like New York, California, Hawaii and Nevada that rely heavily on tourism, as well as food and accommodation, are among the deepest of the economic hole and have the longest way to go, according to the The Federal Reserve’s April State Coincidence Index, which estimates economic conditions based on local employment and wage data corresponding to state GDP trends.

Hawaii’s economic activity in April was 13% lower than it was in January 2020, according to the index. Activity in Nevada and New York is also still down nearly 10% from before the pandemic. Florida, down just 1%, is doing better.

But states like Utah, Idaho, South Dakota, and Nebraska that rely heavily on food processing and manufacturing – industries deemed critical and required to stay open during the pandemic – are falling back to the forefront. normal much faster.

“What we are seeing is the states that were the most down at the start are still the most down, and it’s basically the states that depend the most on travel,” said Michael Ettlinger, founding principal of the Carsey School. of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. “There’s just more destruction, if you will, in these states, and it’s just going to take longer to come back. “

The advantage that GOP-led states such as Georgia, Mississippi, Arizona and Missouri enjoy in rebounding from the pandemic has fueled Republican attacks on Biden’s policies.

More than two dozen GOP governors have decided to end federally-funded extra unemployment benefits, citing labor shortages they say are triggered by generosity. In Congress, Republican lawmakers use a similar argument against Biden’s plans to spend $ 4 trillion to shore up the nation’s infrastructure and expand social programs.

“Our goal should be to rebuild the economy as quickly as possible, not to subsidize it,” said Sen. Mike Rounds (RS.D.), who cited the extension of unemployment benefits. as a reason to vote against an aid plan put in place by the Democrats in March.

Some economists say it is not clear whether generous unemployment benefits are a factor preventing jobs from being filled.

A June analysis of the United States Chamber of Commerce itself has found that the ratio of available workers to job openings is what it was before the pandemic. Before Covid, “companies struggled to fill openings because available workers lacked the skills companies needed,” wrote senior economist Curtis Dubay. “This problem persists now.”

And an analysis of May from the hiring website Indeed’s chief economist, Jed Kolko, found that job search activity in states ending federal benefits saw a brief temporary jump on the platform shortly after. time after the governors announced they would.

Economists, as well as the Biden administration, also say issues such as lingering hardships for parents at daycare, lingering fear of contracting the virus, and an economy that appears to have gone from zero to 60 in a matter of weeks have likely the strongest effect.

“We have this kind of race to the bottom, state after state, with Republican governors… ending the benefits and, frankly, misleading people,” said Senate Finance Chairman Ron Wyden (D-Ore .). “They tried to make a big deal by saying we were cutting the extra $ 300. This is simply not true. They cut an extra week, they cut the concert workers, if someone has exhausted state benefits.

With about 4 million Americans – disproportionately workers of color and women – faced “virtually zero income … which makes the need for federal reform much more serious,” he said.

“This crazy quilt of state systems that offer different levels of data, unemployment benefits and approaches to reopening highlights to me the need, the urgency for fundamental reform,” Wyden said.

He campaigns for an overhaul of the unemployment system that would unite all states under a single benefit infrastructure and create automatic triggers that tie benefits to economic conditions, among other things.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Wyden proposed last year to extend the unemployment benefits program until a state’s unemployment rate falls below 6%, but Republicans were hesitant to support a long-term extension of unemployment assistance financed by taxpayers.

Had Congress passed the proposal last July, 27 states would currently have unemployment rates low enough to phase out the extra $ 300 in additional benefits under the program.

“Hopefully this will spark a conversation after the pandemic ends on how to improve our safety net,” Zhao said, “not just in terms of expanding it, but also making sure it actually reaches the people it needs and reaches them quickly when help is needed.

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Utah economy

NM does not have a real strategic plan to make R&D profitable ”Albuquerque Journal

The Albuquerque Journal recently published: “Census Wakeup Call: State’s low growth shows the need for tough conversations and big political improvements.” This column shows where New Mexico’s rank lags behind that of neighboring states. The question is how to solve this problem. New Mexico needs to have a vision for its economic future and a strategy to implement that vision, but where are we now? Let’s take a look at the data comparing Bernalillo County to high tech, Utah County, Utah where Provo is located.

Between 1998 and 2014, Utah County had a median household income that was $ 15,000 higher than that of Bernalillo County. In 2015, Utah County’s median household income was $ 19,000 higher than that of Bernalillo County. By 2019, this difference had grown to $ 23,000. For most states, their largest city leads the economic development of that state.

Cities with high tech and private sector economies eg Austin, Denver, Salt Lake City, Chandler, Provo, etc. In general, high-tech cities have median household incomes of $ 80,000 or more; large cities in the interior of the United States with no private sector, high-tech economy have median household incomes of $ 55,000 to $ 60,000; and rural areas and small towns have median household incomes of $ 40,000 and less.

In 2017, according to a Brookings study, Albuquerque had a per capita investment of $ 259 in academic research and development (R&D) in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), compared to just $ 60 for Provo. More than $ 3,000 per person is spent on R&D in New Mexico – the nation’s fifth largest – while Utah spends $ 1,200. New Mexico is unlikely to prosper from more investment in R&D unless it learns how to get more out of its R&D funds.

Many believe that high-tech jobs like those created in Utah are only available to masters of science and doctorates. STEM graduates. However, the American Association for the Advancement of Science has determined that even though STEM employment supports 69% of U.S. GDP, 60% of STEM professionals hold less than a bachelor’s degree.

………………………………………….. ……………. …………..

The congressional bill, The Endless Frontiers Act, lists key technological areas that the United States must address to be economically and militarily competitive with China: artificial intelligence and machine learning; high performance computing, semiconductors and advanced computer hardware; quantum computing and information systems; advanced robotics, automation and manufacturing; prevention of natural or man-made disasters; advanced communication technology; biotechnology, genomics and synthetic biology; cybersecurity, data storage and management technologies; advanced energy; and materials science, engineering and exploration relevant to other key technologies.

These are the technologies that New Mexico’s defense labs will focus on in the future. At 25% of the state’s GDP, these defense laboratories are our most important economic asset; during their boom, oil and natural gas accounted for 10%.

New Mexico has contracted SRI to lead our state’s strategic planning effort. The state targets the “industries” of outdoor recreation, value-added agriculture, global trade, advanced manufacturing, biosciences, film and television, cybersecurity, aerospace and renewable energies. Four of them are listed in the Endless Frontiers Act. It is imperative that our state does its strategic planning well and does not focus on building industries with low median household income. As the data shows, we went and we did.

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Utah economy

Home improvement could be a first step towards climate justice

Workers stormed Flora Dillard’s home east of Cleveland. There is plastic on everything and no place to sit, but Dillard doesn’t seem to care. “A few days of inconvenience is nothing compared to the results you get,” she says.

It will benefit, and the climate too. Workers patched cracks around the foundation and diverted a vent to reduce the risk of mold growth. They isolate the upstairs bedroom where the drafts are so cold that Dillard used several electric heaters last winter. They also discovered and repaired a gas leak. “I could have exploded,” said Dillard. “Me and my grandchildren and my brother who is here visiting.”

She didn’t pay anything for it. She can’t afford it. But thanks to government and help with utilities, her house should soon be more comfortable, safer and cheaper to heat. It will burn less fuel, thus reducing the amount of greenhouse gases it releases into the air.

The repairs to Dillard’s house are an example of what is sometimes called “climate equity” – efforts to tackle climate change in a way that also attacks the country’s social and racial inequalities. Millions of homes in American cities are in urgent need of rehabilitation. These homes are often concentrated in predominantly African-American neighborhoods, which have suffered from discrimination and redlining. Many contain health threats like mold, lead contamination, and indoor air pollution.

The same homes are often the least energy efficient, requiring more fuel to cool and heat. Residential housing accounts for about one-fifth of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions.

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Under his sweep infrastructure plan, the Biden administration wants to replicate Flora Dillard’s reparations in millions of homes across the country. The Biden plan would allocate $ 200 billion to renovate and build green homes, especially in what the White House calls “underserved communities.” The goal is to improve people’s homes and create jobs while fighting climate change.

The infrastructure plan, part of which the Biden administration included in its 2022 budget proposal, must be approved by Congress, which is uncertain. The Republican version of an infrastructure package does not include green housing initiatives.

“I feel like this is our lowest fruit and also the means to have the greatest impact, especially in disinvested communities, struggling communities,” said Tony reames, former director of the Urban Energy Justice Lab at the University of Michigan. Reames has just taken a new job as a Senior Advisor at the US Department of Energy.

Cleveland offers a case study on the need and opportunity for home renovation. According to Kevin Nowak, executive director of CHN housing partners, who organized the work at Dillard’s home, tens of thousands of homes have similar problems only in Cuyahoga County, which includes Cleveland. Most Cleveland homes are at least 40 years old. Almost a third of local households earn less than the poverty line, and many homeowners lack money for renovations.

Cleveland drafted its first climate action plan in 2013. But in 2018, the city tore it up and started again, this time with a new focus on fairness. City officials met with hundreds of people in Cleveland neighborhoods to hear their concerns, and in the end they were given the top spot on the city’s to-do list to make more homes “affordable,” comfortable, healthy and energy efficient ”.

Cleveland’s population has more than halved since 1950, decimating the tax base. It would take $ 781 million to fix every house in the Cleveland metro area that needs repairs, according to to researchers at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. This is way beyond what the city government can afford. This is about double what the city pays each year to operate its public school system.

Some private funds for renovations have conditions attached. The local gas utility, Dominion Energy, helped pay for Flora Dillard’s new, more efficient gas-fired furnace. Under the Dominion program, funding must go for a new gas furnace, rather than an electric heat pump that could significantly reduce greenhouse gas pollution.

Nowak says he would rather maximize the number of homes his organization can reach, rather than using limited funds on more expensive equipment needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in a smaller number of homes.

The Biden administration’s plan to pump money into home improvement could dramatically change the situation. White House budget documents forecast a significant increase in funding for a program that pays for the weatherization of homes, from about $ 200 million and $ 300 million annually to $ 17 billion over the next five years. The administration also wants to pour $ 40 billion into the renovation of social housing and $ 27 billion into a “clean energy accelerator” that would act as a non-profit bank that can finance energy saving projects. all kinds.

Cecilia Martinez, senior director of environmental justice at the White House’s Council on Environmental Quality, says the administration’s plan must be ambitious as it tackles huge issues and rooted in a history of discrimination . “We have an opportunity now. This is our key opportunity to transform our economy as well as our infrastructure, ”she said.

Funding alone won’t do the job, even if Congress approves it. Renovating homes on such a large scale will require a rapid increase in hiring by private construction companies and new efforts to reach homeowners whose buildings are in need of work.

Reames, who was interviewed before taking on his new post at DOE, says it might require a new approach as well. Current government programs rely on homeowners to take the initiative and seek help. Flora Dillard, in Cleveland, was lucky: her niece told her about the programs, and when Dillard went to town offices to fill out the paperwork, a former classmate was working there and helped her do it right.

Reames would like cities to see housing as critical infrastructure that they assess regularly, rather than waiting for landlords to contact. “I used to work in local government,” Reames says, “and we would plan our waterline replacements, our streets, based on the age of that infrastructure. And the same goes for housing.

Houses in a particular neighborhood were often built around the same time and can have similar problems. He says cities could put entire neighborhoods on a schedule and go door-to-door, checking out what each needs.

Kimberly Foreman, Executive Director of Environmental health watch who has worked in Cleveland neighborhoods for decades, says these efforts require patience. “We always have to ask the community, what do they want? She said, “rather than saying, ‘We have the answer, you should do it.’ “

You can renovate homes and install new equipment, she says, but these upgrades will only work well if the people who live there understand the changes and actually see the value.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.
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Utah economy

Crowd solutions are needed for crowded Utah national parks

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah’s national parks saw a decline in visits last year due to the pandemic, but most are on course to break records this year.

FOX 13 spoke with a Texan couple who visited Zion and Bryce Canyon in early June. This was Layne and Misty Hill’s first time at both parks and they said they were shocked at the number of people on the trails with them.

“We’ve wanted to do this trip for a long time and we’ve been looking for it for a long time,” Layne said.

“The only thing I wasn’t prepared for when I got there was the number of people,” Misty added.

READ: Yosemite National Park to require reservations from May 21

They expected to spend “time alone” in nature with their children, only to find thousands of other people in Zion National Park as well.

“I thought it would just be more family,” Misty said. “Just us crossing the trails and things and not having to push our way through everyone.”

The hills have avoided some of Zion’s most famous hikes due to overcrowding at the trailhead.

“We were actually going to do Angel’s Landing, but because of the crowds we decided not to do it,” Layne said.

“Yeah, we thought it would be dangerous,” Misty added.

Long queues and waiting times to enter parks are more and more frequent. Zion and Arches are already seeing monthly visit rates exceeding their pre-pandemic levels.

If we had over 610,000 visitors in May of this year alone, compared to over 529,000 in May 2019. The latest data for Arches comes from April, with nearly 194,000 visitors this year compared to more than 168,000 in 2019.

READ: Zion National Park designated as International Dark Sky Park

Bryce Canyon, which has seen a steady increase in visits over the past decade, is still catching up to pre-pandemic rates. It welcomed nearly 299,000 visitors in May and nearly 328,000 people came to the park in May 2019.

High attendance figures have some in communities like Moab and Springdale calling for a reservation system, or scheduled entry, that would stagger entry into the park. Some argue it would help reduce overcrowding and give rangers the ability to maintain the trails.

“I think that would be a good idea. Especially for Angel’s Landing, it’s just too dangerous,” Layne said.

“Just for the security concerns, I think this would be a great option,” Misty added.

Others believe it would hurt local businesses. A 2018 study commissioned by the National Parks Service found that a reservation system would take $ 22 million out of Moab’s economy in its first year.

READ: Zion National Park warns of toxins in Virgin River

Supporters report a reservation program implemented by Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, where the neighboring town of Estes Park saw a sales tax increase as visitors shopped and dined in town in waiting to enter the park.

The Zion National Park information officer was not available for an on-camera interview for this story, but said over the phone that the park has been breaking monthly visitation records since September, and they don’t expect not to stop him at all times. soon.

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Utah economy

American Airlines cancels hundreds of flights through mid-July, in part due to labor shortage

(CNN) – American Airlines cancels hundreds of flights until at least mid-July as company strives to maintain service amid massively surging travel demand as coronavirus pandemic continues to recede in states United, according to an airline spokesperson.

“The first weeks of June brought unprecedented weather conditions to our largest hubs, severely affecting our operations and causing delays, canceled flights and disruption to crew member schedules and our customers’ plans,” airline spokeswoman Shannon Gilson told CNN. . “This, combined with the labor shortages some of our suppliers face and the incredibly rapid rise in customer demand, has resulted in us building the resilience and certainty of our operations by adjusting a fraction of our flights scheduled until mid-July. “

Yet the fraction of targeted cancellations amounts to hundreds of flights up to mid-July. American Airlines recorded 120 cancellations on Saturday and the company expects 50 to 80 flight cancellations per day going forward, according to Gibson.

Industries across the country have struggled to hire employees as the economy tries to return to pre-pandemic normal.

Customers who had been booked through July 15 will be notified or have already received notifications if their flights have been canceled so they can make travel adjustments in advance, Gibson said.

Gibson also said the cancellations will be spread across its system, to minimize the impact in a single area, although there is a larger effect at Dallas-Fort Worth, an American Airlines hub.

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Utah economy

Las Vegas pushes land swap to balance growth and conservation – St George News

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This file photo, Feb. 9, 2005, shows the suburbs of Las Vegas from the top of the Stratosphere Tower looking west on Sahara Avenue towards the Spring Mountains. Despite the drought, cities in the American West expect their populations to increase dramatically over the next several decades. From Phoenix to Boise, officials are working to ensure they have the resources, infrastructure and housing supply needed to meet growth projections. In parts of the region, their efforts are limited by the fact that sprawling metropolitan areas are surrounded by federally owned land. US Senator Catherine Cortez Masto Wants To Fix Las Vegas Problem By Tightening Protections Of Some Public Land While Approving The Sale Of Others To Commercial And Residential Developers | Associated Press File Photo by Joe Cavaretta, St. George News

CARSON CITY, Nevada (AP) – The record heat and historic drought in the western United States does little to discourage cities from planning to welcome millions of new residents in the decades to come.

In this October 11, 2016 file photo, a gypsum mine owned by developer Jim Rhodes, who wants to develop housing on the site, is seen in the foreground while the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area is seen in the distance . Despite the drought, cities in the American West expect their populations to increase dramatically over the next several decades. | Photo courtesy of LE Baskow / Las Vegas Sun via AP, St. George News

From Phoenix to Boise, authorities are preparing for a future that is both more human and less water-intensive, seeking to balance growth and conservation. Development is constrained by the fact that 46% of the western region of 11 states is federal land, managed by agencies like the US Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management who are responsible for maintaining it for future generations.

This has led officials in states like Nevada and Utah to press the federal government to approve land transfers to allow developers to build homes and businesses on what was previously land. public. Supporters of both states have wowed environmentalists in the past with provisions that allocate revenue to conservation projects, preserve other federal lands, and prevent road construction, logging, or energy exploration.

A small group of opponents argue that the systematic endorsement of this type of “trade” to facilitate growth is not sustainable, especially in areas that depend on dwindling water supplies.

For the seven states that depend on the Colorado River – Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming – a regional drought is so severe that less water is flowing to Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the two artificial reservoirs where the river water is stored.

If the level of Lake Mead continues to decline throughout the summer as planned, the federal government will likely issue its very first official declaration of shortage, leading to reductions in the water share that Arizona and Nevada have. receive.

The situation is playing out in the Las Vegas area, where environmental groups, local officials and home builders have united behind a proposal from U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto that was heard in the Senate this week.

The Nevada Democrat is pushing what she calls the largest conservation bill in state history to designate more than 3,125 square miles of land for additional protections – roughly the size of Delaware and the United States. Rhode Island combined – and 48 square miles for commercial and residential development, which is about the size of San Francisco.

Some environmentalists support the proposal because it would add federal land to the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area for recreation and reclassify undeveloped parts of Clark County, where Las Vegas is located, and the Desert National Wildlife Refuge as Bureau of Land Management’s “wilderness areas”, which offer stronger protections than national parks.

Jocelyn Torres, field director for the Conservation Lands Foundation, said during the Senate hearing on Wednesday that the protections would restore the lands to capture carbon more effectively, which would help mitigate rising temperatures.

“Our public lands present our best chance to tackle climate change, our biodiversity crisis and invest in our local communities and economy,” she said.

FILE – In this August 13, 2020 file photo, a light mineral tub ring marks the high water mark of Lake Mead in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area near Boulder City, Nevada | Photo by John Locher / Associated Press, St. George News

The effort reflects land management efforts over the past decade in Washington and Emery counties in Utah to designate the wilderness and sell other plots to developers to meet growth projections. The US Census Bureau reported that St. George, in Washington County, was the fifth fastest growing metropolitan area in the country last year.

In both regions, affordable housing is one of the authorities’ main concerns. Soaring house prices in California have added to a flow of people leaving for neighboring states like Nevada, Arizona and Colorado, where open land, lower tax rates and jobs attract new residents.

The fast growing Las Vegas area lacks housing supply to meet projected population growth. A 2019 study from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, which found that references to Cortez Masto’s legislation predicted that the population of Clark County would increase by 35%, to 3.1 million, from by 2060. This peak will be difficult to manage without building in existing communities or public lands.

“As a result of this federal ownership, our planning and development options are very limited and require constant coordination with federal agencies,” said Marcie Henson, director of the Clark County Air Quality Department.

Growth can stretch an already limited water supply. Water officials back the proposal, which allocates funds for the maintenance of canals used to recycle sewage through Lake Mead. The region has adopted some of the most aggressive conservation measures in the American West, including an outright ban on decorative grass in some places, to prepare for growth.

Last year, water officials predicted a worst-case scenario in which consumption patterns and climate change could force them to find alternative supplies as early as 2056. Critics say the projections are concerning.

“This legislation has no sustainable water supply identified in 50 years,” said Kyle Roerink, executive director of the Nevada-based Great Basin Water Network conservation group. “When you combine that with everything we read about Lake Mead and the Colorado River, it is very precarious to introduce a bill that invites 825,000 more people into the Mojave Desert. “

Southern Nevada Water Authority chief executive John Entsminger said in a statement that the proposal “helps secure the water resources and facilities that SNWA needs to provide reliable and safe water to our customers for decades to come “.

When Cortez Masto’s proposal was brought forward, there was little question of how water accommodates future growth plans or whether the conservation elements of the bill might have an impact.

Roerink said the plan’s funding allocations for water infrastructure must be accompanied by additional “serious and realistic modeling” of the Colorado River.

“When an entity says, ‘Let’s go build houses in this area’, it implies that the water will be there in perpetuity,” he said.

Written by SAM METZ, Associated Press / Report for America.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Utah economy

Moderate Iranian candidate concedes victory for head of the judiciary Ebrahim Raisi

The only moderate in the Iranian presidential election conceded defeat on Saturday morning to the country’s head of radical justice. It signaled that Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei’s protégé won a vote he dominated after his stronger competitor was disqualified.

Former moderate head of the Central Bank Abdolnasser Hemmati and former Revolutionary Guard commander Mohsen Rezaei congratulated Ebrahim Raisi.

In the first results, Raisi won 17.8 million votes, compared to 3.3 million for Rezaei and 2.4 million for Hemmati, said Jamal Orf, head of the electoral headquarters of Iran’s interior ministry. The fourth candidate in the race, Amirhossein Ghazizadeh Hashemi, got around 1 million votes, Orf said.

The first results announced also appeared to show that the race had the lowest turnout in the country since the Islamic Revolution of 1979. However, the vote did not have international observers to monitor the election as in previous years.

This makes Raisi – who faces US sanctions for his role in the mass executions – the clear winner of the race. It was then that his candidacy sparked widespread apathy among eligible voters in the Islamic Republic, which has long retained participation as a sign of support for the theocracy since its 1979 Islamic revolution.

The swift concessions, while not unusual in previous Iranian elections, signaled what semi-official news agencies in Iran had hinted at for hours: that the carefully controlled vote had been a resounding victory for Raisi amid the calls from some for a boycott.

Hemmati offered his congratulations on Instagram to Raisi early on Saturday.

“I hope that your administration is a source of pride for the Islamic Republic of Iran, improves the economy and life with comfort and well-being for the great Iranian nation,” he wrote.

On Twitter, Rezaei congratulated Khamenei and the Iranian people for participating in the vote.

“God willing, the decisive election of my esteemed brother Ayatollah Dr Seyyed Ebrahim Raisi promises the establishment of a strong and popular government to solve the country’s problems,” Rezaei wrote.

As night fell on Friday, the turnout appeared to be much lower than in the last Iranian presidential election in 2017. At a polling station in a mosque in central Tehran, a Shiite cleric played football with a youth. boy while most of his employees were napping in a yard. In another, officials watched videos on their cellphones as state television screamed alongside them, offering only tight shots of locations across the country – as opposed to long election lines. past.

Voting ended at 2 a.m. on Saturday, after the government extended the vote to accommodate what it called “overcrowding” at several polling stations nationwide. The paper ballots, crammed into large plastic boxes, were to be counted by hand overnight, and authorities said they expected to have the first results and turnout numbers by Saturday morning at the most. early.

“My vote will not change anything in this election, the number of people voting for Raisi is huge and Hemmati does not have the skills to do this,” said Hediyeh, a 25-year-old woman who gave only her first name. . rushing to a taxi in Haft-e Tir Square after avoiding the ballot box. “I don’t have a candidate here.”

Iranian state television has sought to downplay participation, singling out the Arab sheikhs in the Gulf around it, led by hereditary rulers and low participation in Western democracies. After a day of escalating authorities’ attempts to get the vote out, state television overnight aired scenes from crowded voting booths in several provinces, seeking to portray a last-minute rush to the polls.

But since the 1979 revolution toppled the shah, the Iranian theocracy has cited voter turnout as a sign of its legitimacy, starting with its first referendum which won 98.2% support and which simply asked if people wanted or not an Islamic Republic.

The disqualifications affected reformists and supporters of Rouhani, whose administration both struck the 2015 nuclear deal with world powers and saw it disintegrate three years later with America’s unilateral withdrawal. of the deal by then-President Donald Trump. Former radical president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, also barred from running, said on social media that he would boycott the vote.

Voter apathy has also been fueled by the devastated state of the economy and a moderate campaign amid months of rising coronavirus cases. Poll workers wore gloves and masks, and some wiped the ballot boxes with disinfectants.

If elected, Raisi would be the first sitting Iranian president to be sanctioned by the US government even before taking office for his involvement in the mass execution of political prisoners in 1988, as well as for his tenure as head. of the internationally criticized Iranian justice system – one of the best executioners in the world.

It would also firmly put hard-line supporters in control across the government as negotiations in Vienna continue in an attempt to salvage a tattered deal meant to limit Iran’s nuclear program at a time when Tehran is enriching Iran. uranium at its highest level ever recorded, although it is still short. weapon quality levels. Tensions remain high with the United States and Israel, which reportedly carried out a series of attacks targeting Iranian nuclear sites and assassinated the scientist who created his military atomic program decades earlier.

Whoever wins will likely serve two four-year terms and therefore could lead what could be one of the most pivotal moments for the country in decades – the death of Khamenei, 82. Speculation has already started that Raisi could be a candidate for the post, along with Khamenei’s son, Mojtaba.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.
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Utah economy

Nu Skin Enterprises to Present at the Jefferies Consumer Conference

Provo – Nu Skin Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE: NUS) announced today that President and CEO-elect Ryan Napierski and CFO Mark Lawrence will present at the Jefferies Virtual Consumer Conference on Tuesday, June 22, 2021. They will share their views on the emergence of social commerce and the odd-job economy and how they empower people.

The company presentation will be webcast live starting at 2:40 p.m. ET. Those wishing to access the event can visit the Nu Skin Investor Relations page on ir.nuskin.com. The archives of the webcast will be available at the same location until Tuesday, July 6, 2021.

About Nu Skin Enterprises, Inc.
Founded over 35 years ago, Nu Skin Enterprises, Inc. (NSE) provides innovative businesses with sustainable solutions, opportunities, technologies and values ​​that improve lives. The company is currently focusing its efforts on innovative consumer products, product manufacturing and agricultural technology in a controlled environment. The NSE family of companies includes Nu Skin, which develops and distributes a full line of premium beauty and wellness solutions through a global network of sales leaders in Asia, the Americas, Europe, Africa and The pacific ; and Rhyz, our strategic investment arm that includes a collection of sustainable manufacturing and technology innovation companies. Nu Skin Enterprises is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “NUS”. More information is available at nuskinenterprises.com.

SOURCE Nu Skin Enterprises

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http://www.nuskinenterprises.com/

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Utah economy

Venmo Touch will help Chicago’s Braintree mobile transactions surpass $ 2 billion annually – TechCrunch

Venmo Touch will help Chicago’s Braintree mobile transactions surpass $ 2 billion annually – TechCrunch

Brain, a payment gateway backed by Accel Partners and NEA, appears to have effectively doubled the volume of mobile transactions it sees per year to $ 2 billion. He now boasts 40 million credit card accounts in his safe.

How does this compare to the competition? eBay, which operates Paypal, said he had 123 million registered accounts in his last earnings filing and that it expects to generate around $ 20 billion in mobile commerce and payments volume. So while Braintree is even smaller, it’s one of the few notable emerging companies in the space. The Combinator’s Stripe is the other with its formidable concentration of technical talent.

Braintree made waves last year when it bought Venmo, a New York-based mobile payment startup that has made it easy and frictionless to transfer money via SMS and email.

The company kept the Venmo brand name when it launched a series of products including Venmo Touch, making it easy for consumers to store their payment information on a network of Braintree-supported apps like HotelTonight, Airbnb, and Uber. The idea is to reduce friction when entering credit card information, so that customers don’t give up on potential purchases.

Instead of having to re-enter your credit card information every time you sign up for a new Braintree-supported mobile service, Venmo Touch will automatically remember your payment details with just one click. Venmo Touch was in beta, but it’s now fully released and available to all Braintree merchants.

On top of that, they’re releasing a new iOS SDK, which will make it easier for developers to create a native checkout flow with UI images and text suggestions. It has a payment form, which already has a lot of credit card entry UI elements and other features that help detect typos. They will bring both Venmo Touch and an improved SDK to Android in the near future.

Brain has raised $ 69 million in venture capital to date from New Enterprise Associates, Accel Partners, RRE Ventures and Greycroft Partners. Find out venmo limit here.

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