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Will there be COVID-19 booster injections? Not yet, say the experts

With the resurgence of COVID-19 cases in Utah, is it time for fully vaccinated people to receive booster shots?

Pfizer and its partner company in the production of one of three coronavirus vaccines approved for use in the United States, Bio-Tech, on Thursday announced a new study showing promising results from the administration of a third vaccine , six months after the first two, and plan to submit their findings to federal authorities for clearance.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration responded by a joint declaration, “Americans who have been fully immunized do not need a booster at this time,” but said the issue was under review and the recommendation may change.

“We are ready to receive booster doses if and when science shows they are needed,” the statement said. A person is considered fully vaccinated two weeks after their last dose of vaccine – two injections for Pfizer or Moderna and one for Johnson & Johnson.

Utah health experts also say not yet, although they recognize there is growing interest, especially among those who have received the Johnson & Johnson single-dose vaccine, to provide greater protection. against the highly contagious delta variant of the virus first detected in India now dominant in Utah and the rest of the country.

“This one is touchy,” said Dr Michelle Hofmann, deputy director of the Utah Department of Health, calling for a question about the extra blows raised at a recent virtual press conference to encourage vaccinations “to the tip of where we can be Go. “

Some countries already allow the administration of a different type of vaccine as a second dose after a vaccine similar in composition to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. J&J shot is less effective against the original coronavirus, with around 60% effectiveness compared to 95% for Pfizer and Moderna.

All three vaccines largely prevent hospitalization and death in fully vaccinated people, but the decline in their performance compared to the delta variant is now a problem. Studies have shown that both doses of Pfizer – and possibly Moderna, which uses the same new technology – are needed, but there is little data on Johnson & Johnson.

It is official CDC policy that vaccines are not interchangeable, although the The National Institutes of Health announced in June that a clinical trial was underway To determine the safety and effectiveness of administering booster doses of various COVID-19 vaccines to fully vaccinated adults.

“We don’t currently recommend this in the United States,” Hofmann said, citing potential safety concerns. “We are starting to hear from people who are interested and wondering about this, but this is currently not a recommendation.”

Yet not everyone is ready to wait. Hofmann was responding to a question posted on Facebook by a woman who said she knew “several people who had the J&J vaccine who went and received a second dose of Moderna or Pfizer. Is it recommended, safe or necessary? “

There are several media reports of people who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine but then surreptitiously sought out Pfizer injections in hopes that the higher efficacy associated with the new type of vaccine will make them less likely to know a revolutionary case of COVID-19.

A few, including Angela Rasmussen, a virologist with the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization at the University of Saskatchewan, are experts in the field. Rasmussen, an American working in Canada, tweeted at the end of June that she had received an injection of Pfizer “to supplement the J&J vaccine I received in April” and was feeling well.

“I think I did what it took to make sure I was as protected as possible from the delta variant and thus protect the others who only have one chance,” she said. in his widely-read Twitter feed, adding, “Sometimes public health requires making tough decisions without a full data set to back it up.

Shortly before the July 4th recess, the region’s largest healthcare provider, Intermountain Healthcare, told patients vaccinated in a blog post it’s too early to roll up their sleeves for another dose because, “So far the signs are good that we won’t need any reminders anytime soon.

The publication said federal agencies were assessing the risk of additional vaccines by looking at various factors, including whether breakthrough cases in fully vaccinated people increased, whether booster doses or the combination of different types of vaccines offered more protection, and if the variants were more difficult to fight. .

It remains to be seen how long it will take to make this decision, said Dr Tamara Sheffield, medical director of preventive medicine at Intermountain Healthcare. This could happen sooner rather than later once the effectiveness of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine against the delta variant is known.

“At this point, we don’t have anything that tells us we should do this yet. But that could change quickly, ”Sheffield said. In the meantime, she offered some advice to Utahns who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine – less than 130,000 compared to nearly 1.5 million in the state who received Pfizer or Moderna.

“I tend to be a more careful person,” she said. “I would say to anyone who is wondering if they are fully protected to follow prudent collection behaviors. If you are indoors with a group of people who may not have been vaccinated, then people should mask themselves. “

Han Kim, professor of public health at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, said data on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine are difficult to come by because relatively few people have received a single injection, adding that “it may not be. not be a bad idea to get a vaccine. booster.”

A federal government decision on such vaccines could move closer to fall, Kim said, when COVID-19 cases could rise even more as students, especially those under the age of 12 who are not eligible for the vaccine, return to classrooms and people spend more time indoors when temperatures drop.

Pfizer’s announcement of the booster injections raises questions, he said.

“There is a lot of discussion among epidemiologists and public health specialists that this is completely unnecessary,” Kim said, noting that the vaccine should remain “fairly effective” for at least a year and that injections do not need to be. started only last December and became widely available months later. .

“We live in a world where there is enormous injustice in terms of vaccine distribution and we will start prioritizing a third vaccine for Americans, in a country that is still struggling to reach 70% of the population. adult population with a pull? A lot of people say it’s way too premature, ”he said.

Gov. Spencer Cox said Utah has met that 70% goal, if vaccine doses administered by federal state agencies are counted. But many areas of the state, including Utah County and rural communities, have much lower vaccination rates and less than 45% of the overall population is fully vaccinated.

“We should be focusing on getting people, in fact, their first shot, let alone a third,” Kim said. He said that not only would administering a third dose be logistically difficult, but it was also seen by some as “Pfizer taking advantage of this situation to request a third dose”.


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This week’s winners and losers in Utah politics

Hello Utah and TGIF! Thanks for reading “The Rundown”.

Tell me what you think. I’d love to hear your thoughts on how to make this newsletter more useful. Email me or find me on Twitter @SchottHappens.

Receive this newsletter in your inbox every morning of the week. Sign up for free here.

This Week’s Winners and Losers in Utah Politics

👍🏻 Winner: Sean Reyes. Reyes is one of four attorneys general to lead a multi-state, bipartisan lawsuit targeting Google. The lawsuit alleges that the online giant is essentially acting as a monopoly and taking a larger share of purchases made through the Google Play store than the market dictates. Reyes’ efforts to put the brakes on Big Tech is exactly the sort of thing he should be doing.

👎 Loser: Sean Reyes, Chris Stewart and Burgess Owens. It has been 6 months since a host of supporters of former President Donald Trump attacked the United States Capitol. These three Utahns still haven’t explained why they helped promote in the “big lie” that the 2020 election was not legitimate or their reasoning for trying to overturn the election results.

Reyes took some personal time to “investigate” the Nevada voter fraud (there was none). He also didn’t explain why he signed the ridiculous Texas lawsuit to overturn election results in four states Trump lost.

Stewart and Owens have still not satisfactorily explained why they voted to reject Pennsylvania electoral votes – a decision supported by no evidence. They also fiercely opposed any effort to investigate how and why the attack happened.

The Utahns deserve better than silence on the matter.

👎 Loser: Black Lives Matter Utah. Founder Lex Scott didn’t just serve Republicans red meat when she posted that the American flag was a symbol of hate. She broiled a whole cow.

Scott’s hyperbole obscures a legitimate argument, that Republicans and Conservatives have not condemned far-right and white supremacist groups that use the flag as a rallying symbol. Many of those Trump supporters who attacked Congress literally beat members of the Capitol Police with poles emblazoned with the stars and spangles.

Her exaggerated rhetoric gives her detractors enough space to ignore the point she is trying to make. Plus, it creates an opening for Republicans to smear Democrats by association. If you were wondering if anyone could come up with a more politically damaging message to Democrats than “funding the police,” calling the American flag a symbol of racism must be number one.

Here’s what you need to know for Friday morning

Local News

  • Governor Spencer Cox says reinstating COVID-19 restrictions due to the growing number of cases will not work. Instead, he says the best course of action is to get more people to get vaccinated. [Tribune]

  • Cox was one of 10 governors appointed to President Joe Biden’s bipartisan Board of Governors. The group will advise Biden on several issues, including extreme weather and terrorism. [Tribune]

National News

  • President Joe is targeting August 31 for the end of US military operations in Afghanistan. [AP]

  • President Biden met with civil rights leaders at the White House on Thursday to discuss voting rights. [The Hill]

  • Texas Republicans are renewing their efforts to pass voting restrictions in a special legislative session called by Gov. Greg Abbott. [WaPo]

  • Authorities say the armed group that assassinated the Haitian president included “professional killers”, retired members of the Colombian military and two Americans. [CNN]

  • Four states have started investigating the fundraising practices of Republicans and Democrats. [NYT]

  • Auto maker Toyota has turned the corner again and said it will stop donating to Republicans who are contesting the 2020 election results. [NYT]

  • The stock market fell on Thursday as concerns about the delta variant of COVID-19 rise. [Reuters]

  • Pfizer will seek approval from federal regulators for a COVID-19 recall. [NBC News]

  • Coal consumption is expected to increase by 15% as demand for energy is on the rise. This is the biggest jump since 1990. Warmer temperatures stimulate demand for energy, while drought reduces output from hydroelectric dams. [Bloomberg]

  • A study concludes that the heat wave that scorched the Pacific Northwest earlier this year would be “virtually impossible” without man-made climate change. [CNN]

  • Events during the Tokyo Olympics will take place without fans due to the increase in COVID-19 cases. [Olympics]

  • Wells Fargo tells customers that they are closing all personal lines of credit. [CNBC]

Utah Politics Podcast

In this week’s episode, I am joined by Andy Slavitt to discuss how the United States has botched the response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Slavitt led the team that repaired the Obamacare website during its first deployment. He also headed the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for the Obama administration. He is the author of the new book: Preventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the US Coronavirus Response.

Slavitt says American leaders made a serious mistake in trying to find a political response to a public health crisis.

It was a huge public health challenge, and it involved difficult decisions and compromises. But a lot of what happened reverted to politics, which caused us to take a very different approach. And it was to our detriment, ”Slavitt said.

Listen to and subscribe to the podcast here.

Friday’s Utah News Summary

Utah

  • 5 questions to the head of the new Taylorsville Police Department. [Tribune]

  • The Navajo Public Safety Division issues an Amber Alert for two children. [Tribune]

  • We asked, you answered: These are the flags that you told us you used to fly in your home. [Tribune]

  • IRS overturns ruling denying Christian group tax-exempt status. [DNews]

  • How much did Mitt Romney receive for his La Jolla mansion? [DNews]

  • FOX 13 Investigation: Dad says little about a boy from Utah reported as a runaway. [FOX13]

  • A new mural hopes to spark conversations about anti-racism, black joy and safety in Utah. [FOX13]

  • Asian restaurants are the target of hate vandalism, community businesses are helping to address it. [KUTV]

  • Utah County residents accused of allegedly disrupting Alpine School Board meeting. [Daily Herald]

COVID-19[feminine

Gouvernement local

  • À mesure que l’ouest du comté de Weber se développe, des commentaires ont été demandés sur l’expansion du plan directeur. [Standard Examiner]

  • The Weber County plot is at the center of a new development plan after the film studio idea failed. [Standard Examiner]

Environment

  • It was 104 in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, and triple-digit temperatures will continue until next week. [Tribune]

  • HOA sod, parking strip changes, and xeriscaping incentives are believed to be helping Utah’s drought. [FOX13]

  • “Out of the Water”: One Utah reservoir is completely dry, others are dropping to historically low levels. [ABC4]

  • “A high number of bacteria have been found in the pond at Highland Glen Park, residents have warned to stay outside. [Daily Herald]

Technology

  • Utah’s Traeger Grills lights a fire as part of a stock offering effort. [DNews]

  • “Not a question of if, but when”: Ransomware attacks are becoming more and more common in Utah. [ABC4]

Health

  • The “Know Your Script” initiative shows success in the fight against the opioid epidemic. [FOX13]

  • Paiute Tribe of Utah to build a new health facility three times the size of the current building. [Spectrum]

Housing

  • SLC police spend hundreds of hours a week making calls related to the homeless, according to public records. [KUTV]

  • Local religious leaders are calling for federal relief funds to be used to end homelessness in Salt Lake County. [KSL]

On opinion pages

  • Robert C. Wadman: It’s sad how abused the American flag is. [Tribune]

  • Jeremy Glauser: Utah needs an urgent investment in K-12 special education and mental health. [Tribune]

🎂 You say it’s your birthday? !!

On Saturday, send birthday greetings to former State Senator Dan Liljenquist and former Tribune reporter Lee Davidson.

On Sunday we say many happy returns to Governor Spencer Cox, former State Representative Kim Coleman and Daryl Wolke.

Do you have a birthday that you would like us to recognize in this space? Send us an e-mail.

– Tribune reporter Connor Sanders contributed to this report.



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Fewer pets euthanized in Utah, but rescuers fear the future of some adopted during pandemic

Tiny Tot and Little Bitty are waiting for their adopters to arrive and pick them up from the Best Friends Animal Society in Salt Lake City on Friday, February 26, 2021. Utah has cut its shelters killed by 1,161 in 2020, a 58% reduction from compared to the previous year, which rescuers attribute in large part to the pandemic. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah reduced its shelters killed by 1,161 last year – a 58% reduction from the previous year – making the state the 13th in the country for rescuing the most dogs and cats, according to new data from Best Friends Animal Society.

But animal rescuers fear that some animals adopted during the pandemic may end up at the shelter or be donated as many owners return to their workplaces.

Last year, 44,767 cats and dogs entered shelters. Of these, 39,358 found new homes and 829 were killed for lack of housing, according to the Best Friends Animal Society.

Company spokesperson Temma Martin said that in the first week of the pandemic, many residents “rallied to welcome record numbers.”

The country saw a 90% increase in foster homes as schools, businesses and recreational activities began to close. Many decided it was a good time to adopt because they expected to spend more time at home, Martin said.

“So we saw a huge increase just thanks to Best Friends in the number of foster families and adoptions at the start of the pandemic,” she said.

COVID-19 has also changed how shelters operate, she added. While they quickly closed, many of their animals were placed in foster homes. When a person was interested in adopting an animal, they would virtually meet the animal’s foster family, a counselor, and the animal – a more comfortable and happy environment for the animal to meet a prospective adoptee. This format has led to more adoptions, Martin said.

Shelter organizations always provided all the supplies to foster families, “but it’s great just because the animal lives in a comfortable home environment and shows itself better than in a cage or kennel,” said said Martin.

“A lot of shelters don’t plan to go back to a shelter full of animals and adopt people from there,” she added.

In the United States, there has been a 40% decrease in the number of animals killed or euthanized – a trend rescuers hope not to reverse. In some states, however, reports indicate that pets adopted during the pandemic are being returned at a high rate.

Salt Lake County Animal Services now has 26 dogs in its shelter, up from an average of 10 to 15 at some point before the pandemic, said Randee Lueker, relief and events coordinator. These are dogs that animal services save on the streets because the shelter generally does not accept drops.

At the same time, adoptions from the shelter are on the decline, she said.

The surge in the number of dogs entering shelters does not appear to be a statewide trend more than a year after COVID-19 hit the state, according to Martin.

“It seems to be staying pretty stable, but of course we’re worried. We want to make sure that people, when they return to work, have a plan for their new pets and prepare them for anxiety. separation and also train them, especially if they have a puppy, train them to be good family members so that they don’t now have a one year old dog that doesn’t have good manners to looking after a new home or dealing with new people, ”Martin said.

She said it’s common for people who adopt puppies to face issues as the puppies get older. Some puppies during the pandemic did not receive professional obedience training due to COVID-19 closures.

Martin said it was not too late – families should play ‘catching up’ now to train their dogs if they are unable to do so during the pandemic. She said she had heard of people wanting to relocate their pets now due to behavioral issues, but if the animal hasn’t been trained it will likely create problems for future owners.

The best thing an owner can do in this situation is spay or neuter the dog if he hasn’t already done so, and find some training advice, according to Martin. Virtual training is available through Zoom and other apps, she said. Outdoor classes are also available.

“I know the temptation is there to just find another home for the animal, but if it behaves in a way that is inconvenient for your family, it will probably be inconvenient for the next family as well,” said Martin. . “These animals were there for us during the pandemic at a difficult time to provide us with companionship.… We owe it to them to help them become a good member of the family, and that involves training.”

For those worried about leaving their pets at home when they go to work, Martin noted that many people were doing so long before the start of the pandemic. Owners can train their pets to be alone for short periods of time and then have them work for longer periods. Dogs typically sleep most of the day when they’re alone, Martin said, so it’s possible to work full-time and have a pet to greet you when you get home.

“This is something we want to make sure people are prepared for so that there isn’t a flood of animals being turned into shelters,” Martin said.

Millions of people bought puppies at the start of the pandemic, Martin said, noting that they were not initially refuge animals and did not come with training. If a lot of homeowners decide to abandon them, “it would have a huge impact on the shelters,” she said.

Most dogs at the Salt Lake County Animal Shelter are between 1 and 3 years old, according to Lueker. Almost a third are huskies, several are shepherds and some are working dogs. She said the shelter has seen an increase in the number of dogs with behavioral issues, but workers at the shelter aren’t sure why.

Lueker urges interested residents to consider adopting or fostering a dog from the county shelter. More information can be found at adoptutahpets.org.

About 70% of Utah animal shelters are designated as no-kill shelters, meaning they only kill animals that are not adoptable, whether due to medical or behavioral issues. They also aim to adopt at least 90% of the animals housed at the shelter.

Those who want to help the state reach the threshold set by the No-Kill Initiative Utah can make an impact by choosing to adopt from a shelter or rescue group, spaying or neutering their pets, adopting pets, volunteering and spreading the word about welfare issues -be animal, said Martin.

For areas with higher death rates, this is usually due to cats in the community, she said, encouraging people to find out if their local government supports programs that trap, neuter and return feral cats. in the colonies. If more shelters adopt such programs, it can help prevent hundreds of animal deaths, Martin said.

Utah County is the only county along the Wasatch Front that does not have a “back-to-the-field” program for stray cats.

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There is a light that sometimes goes out: the Olympic torch protests | Olympic torch

AAre you sort of, sort of, not really into the fact that the Olympics will still be held later this month in Tokyo despite the coronavirus pandemic and the vast majority of the 7.8 billion inhabitants of our planet are not vaccinated, with alarming epidemics all over the world?

If so, you have a friend in Kayoko Takahashi.

According to Tokyo reporterHitachi’s 53-year-old woman attempted to extinguish the Olympic torch flame as she passed through Mito on her way to the Japanese capital on Sunday by shooting him with a water pistol.

“We are opposed to the Olympics! she can be heard screaming in a video that has since gone viral on social media as she aims for the torch. “Stop the Games! “

Apparently, Takahashi’s opposition stems due to the fact that only 14% of the Japanese population has been fully vaccinated against Covid-19.

Her efforts to extinguish the flame were ultimately unsuccessful, although she was arrested for “deliberately targeting the runner. [carrying the torch] and interfere with the relay, ”Mito deputy police chief Noriaki Nagatsuka told Vice News.

In Takahashi’s defense, it’s actually difficult to put out an Olympic torch. (Unless you’re a real rainstorm, like the one at the 1976 Montreal Games that managed to extinguish the entire stadium’s gigantic flame.) However, many have tried to do so! And often for political reasons. Others took advantage of the torch’s high media visibility to organize other types of events while leaving the flame itself alone. Here are some notable examples from the last decades.

Rio de Janeiro

As the Olympic Torch Relay entered its home stretch towards Rio de Janeiro for the 2016 Games, a young man threw a bucket of water in an ultimately unsuccessful attempt to shut it down.

Angra dos Reis, Brazil

The man was not the only one who tried to put out the torch ahead of the 2016 Games in Brazil. As the flame passed through Angra dos Reis, a group of striking teachers – enraged at the Rio state government for funding the Olympics without paying for them for two months – successfully seized it. turn it off as part of their protest.

Voronezh, Russia

Two years earlier on the torch relay in Sochi, a gay rights activist tried to wave a rainbow flag as the flame passed through Voronezh, presumably to draw attention to the Russian state’s oppression of LGBTQ + people. He was attacked and detained by the police for doing so.

London

As the Olympic torch passed through London en route to the 2008 Beijing Games, a protester tried in vain to turn it off using a literal fire extinguisher.

Paris

French protesters success where this fire extinguisher fan failed, however, managing to extinguish the flame at least three times in an attempt to draw attention to the Chinese government’s record of human rights violations in occupied Tibet.

Juneau, Alaska

And finally, we have … bong tubes for Jesus? Yeah! Bong knocks for Jesus. In 2002, an Alaskan high school student held up a “BONG HITS 4 JESUS” banner beside the Olympic Torch Relay as he passed through Juneau on his way to Salt Lake City. His 10-day suspension gave way to a First Amendment legal battle, culminating in a 2007 Supreme Court ruling in favor of school administrators.



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1,149 weekend COVID-19 cases, 7 deaths, over 13,000 vaccinations reported as Utah hits 70% vaccine target

Jamie Bone, a nurse with the Davis County Department of Health, prepares a syringe of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the Legacy Center Indoor Arena in Farmington on Tuesday, January 12, 2021. Seventy percent of all adults in Utah now have at least a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, Governor Spencer Cox’s office confirmed on Tuesday. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah Department of Health reported the following update on COVID-19 in the state from Saturday to Tuesday:

  • 1,149 new cases
  • 7 deaths
  • 13,878 vaccines administered

The seven-day moving average for positive cases in the state is now 386 per day.

Seventy percent of all adults in Utah now have at least a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, Governor Spencer Cox’s office has confirmed Tuesday, although the state appears to be using outdated demographics to calculate that vaccination rate.

The governor’s office had set a goal of seeing 70% of Utahns aged 18 and over receive at least their first shot of the vaccine by July 4. The state achieved that target on Tuesday.

“This is really a milestone that deserves to be celebrated,” Cox’s office said on Twitter. “Most of all, we are grateful to all the nurses, doctors, healthcare workers, hospitals and volunteers… who continue to work tirelessly to get us all vaccinated!

Since July 4, the Utah Department of Health reported that 65.2% of adults in Utah had received at least their first dose, Cox’s office said. However, that percentage does not include 114,908 doses of the vaccine that were administered in Utah by federal government agencies such as the Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, and Indian Health Services.

With those additional doses, 1,596,999 Utahns received their first dose of vaccine, Cox’s office said. The governor’s office reported that Utah’s adult population was 2,274,774, so about 70.2% of the adult population now has at least their first dose.

“And that number will only increase,” Cox’s office tweeted.

But that’s an older figure for the population of Utah. The United States Census Bureau most recent data estimates the total population of Utah at approximately 3,271,616, of which approximately 948,769, or 29%, are under the age of 18. Using this data, the percentage of Utah adults who receive at least a first dose is closer to 68.75%.

However, Utah executives, including Cox, said the 70% target was somewhat arbitrary. They will continue to work to vaccinate as many people and exceed the statewide target of 70%, the governor’s office added in a statement on Tuesday. Press release.

“Even if we hit 70%, that doesn’t mean it’s the end of the game,” Cox said at a press conference last week.

Cox’s office thanked those who got vaccinated, as well as the Utah Department of Health and local state health departments for their efforts to get as many people vaccinated as possible.

“They have been striving to take the initiative to set up mass vaccination sites statewide and continue to provide vaccines in their communities,” the press release said.

Cox’s office also thanked the Salt Lake Chamber for launching the “Bring it Home” campaign, which encourages companies to support employees who want to get vaccinated.

Cox’s office added that the pandemic is not over and the state is not out of the woods just yet. Utah has seen a small increase in the number of new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, which is believed to be mainly due to the spread of the delta variant among unvaccinated people.

“We are still very concerned about the recent increase in cases and hospitalizations,” the statement said. “And parts of the state, including many of our rural areas and communities of color, remain under 70% immunized.”

This story will be updated.

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Here is the latest Idaho news from the Associated Press at 1:40 a.m. MDT.

PORTLAND, Oregon (AP) – The governor of Oregon has said a heat wave in the Pacific Northwest has killed at least 95 people in that state alone. Democratic Governor Kate Brown told CBS’s “Face the Nation” on Sunday that government officials had warned people of the heat, scattered water to vulnerable people and set up cooling stations. Even so, Brown calls the death toll “absolutely unacceptable.” Hundreds of people are believed to have died from the heat over the past week in the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. Record temperatures included 116 degrees in Portland and 108 in Seattle. Warm weather is heading east, with temperatures well above 100 predicted Sunday for parts of Idaho and Montana.

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – Wildlife officials say a rare animal spotted in a Utah neighborhood is likely on the move looking for a new place to live. The Salt Lake Tribune reports that a home doorbell camera captured the wolverine on video Thursday in West Layton about 15 miles west of Salt Lake City. Utah Wildlife Division officials believe it is the same animal seen on nearby Antelope Island in early May. Wolverines have only been seen six times in Utah. The last time before this year was in 2016. Wolverines look like a combination of skunk and bear and can reach 40 pounds.

KETCHUM, Idaho (AP) – The Nature Conservancy has closed its Silver Creek reserve in central Idaho to fishing due to low water levels and extreme heat. The Idaho Mountain Express reports that the group announced the closure Thursday night. The reserve is one of the most popular trout fishing destinations in the region. The Nature Conservancy says the water temperature recently hit 73 degrees. Warm water means less dissolved oxygen for the fish. The group says closing the reserve to fishing will reduce stress on fish when they experience prolonged stressful conditions. There is no estimate of when fishing might be re-authorized.

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) – Observers say the housing boom in metro Spokane, Wash., Is a problem of numbers. Far too many people are moving in, far too few homes are being built and prices have skyrocketed to unprecedented levels. In May, the Wall Street Journal / realtor.com Emerging Housing Markets Index ranked Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, which is part of that combined metropolitan statistical area, as having the fastest rising home prices in the country. Spokane County came in at No.5. The median price of homes in Spokane County in May was $ 375,000, up 29% from the median of $ 289,900 in May 2020.


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Family history library to reopen with some changes

The research center took advantage of the closures linked to COVID-19 to renovate itself.

(Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) The Family History Library will begin a gradual reopening on July 6 with limited hours from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Hours will stretch from there, so check the Family History Library website for the most recent visitor information.

When the Family History Library in downtown Salt Lake City reopens on July 6, visitors will find it’s not quite their memory.

The Family History Library, owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, closed in March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

But the church used this time to renovate itself, adding improved technology, better lighting, new office book scanners, expanded space for interactive experiences and more, according to a recent one. FamilySearch blog post.

The Family History Library will begin a gradual reopening on July 6 with limited hours from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Hours will stretch from there, so check the Family history library website for the most recent visitor information.

Local FamilySearch libraries and family history centers will open based on direction from church leaders and government direction. Remote services are always available.

According to the blog post, each of the library’s five floors has been revamped to improve the space and help visitors find what they’re looking for.

On all floors, referral desks have been relocated in front of elevators, and new desks also serve clients better, as per the guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The remodel also added “a lot more” shelves to accommodate more than 40,000 volumes, the blog says.

Many visitor computer stations now have two or three monitors, and all stations can accommodate visitors’ laptops. Up-to-date microfilm readers and scanners now work with the computers of many visitor workstations so that visitors can examine books and microfilm and make copies of digital images at their workstations, rather than going to a shop. designated scan or copy area.

Other changes include computer stations redistributed to make room for expanded research equipment and an expanded break room with a small kitchenette and ice maker for guests.


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Yes, the forest fire danger is really that bad • Salt Lake Magazine

I know. I know. You want to be able to light fireworks with your friends and family on Independence Day. And, let’s be honest, no one is going to stop you. While some cities have stricter restrictions on fireworks than others, there is no general ban on fireworks in Utah (unless you are on public land). For the most part, unless your city has unique restrictions, you’re safe as long as you turn them on July 2-5 (or July 22-25 for the Pioneer Day holiday).

But just because you can get away with it, right? It’s dry there. Most of the state is subject to extreme drought, creating the perfect conditions for wildfires to start and spread quickly.

According to the Bureau of Land Management, already this year, people have started up to 370 forest fires in Utah. It is 370 forest fires that could have been avoided. At a press conference on Wednesday, Utah Gov. Spencer Cox said 81 percent of this year’s wildfires, which burned 23,000 acres, were man-made. Fireworks sparked 65 forest fires last year. This does not include city fires caused by fireworks.

Many fire chiefs and leaders of state and local governments are begging members of the public to forgo any personal fireworks this year, imploring them instead to see a show put on by their community. So if they’re all so against the people lighting fireworks this year, why not ban it outright?

On this point, the governor says his hands are tied. At that same press conference, he criticized state law for not giving him the power to ban fireworks. Most towns and cities also fail an outright ban, also pointing out that state law prohibits them from doing so. (The notable exception is Mayor Erin Mendenhall, who enacted a ban on personal fireworks throughout Salt Lake City.)

Although pointing fingers is a very mature way of dealing with the situation, it almost the impression that no one wants to be held responsible for taking away the people’s fireworks (even during the state’s record drought).


Here is a list of local fireworks restrictions to see what your city allows and Salt lake the magazine’s story about where you can catch a community fireworks show on July 4th, instead of starting your own airborne wildfires.


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Was Trump one of the worst presidents of all time?

Good Thursday morning Utah! Welcome to July and thank you for reading “The Rundown”.

📬 Do you have a tip? Some interesting political gossip? Do you just want to discuss politics? Email me or find me on Twitter @SchottHappens.

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Was Trump one of the worst presidents of all time?

If more than 140 presidential historians are to be believed, former President Donald Trump will become one of the worst presidents in history.

Trump ranked 41st out of 44 presidents in quadrennial survey of historians made by C-SPAN. Only Franklin Pierce, Andrew Johnson and James Buchannan ranked lower. Trump was ranked behind William Henry Harrison, who had only been in office for a month, Zachary Taylor, who served just over a year, and James Garfield, who died from an assassin bullet. months after his inauguration.

Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Franklin and Teddy Roosevelt were at the top of the list. The first 5 are unchanged from the last poll.

Historians have been asked to rank CEOs on 10 characteristics. Trump ranked first in public persuasion (# 32) and economic management (# 34). Trump ranked dead last among presidents in terms of moral authority and administrative skills. His constant time of lies and turmoil in the White House probably had something to do with his low ranking.

Ronald Reagan placed 9th overall, just ahead of Barack Obama, who was 10th. Obama was ranked 12th in the 2017 survey.

Here’s what you need to know for Thursday morning

Utah News

  • The leader of the Utah Republican Party wants to sit down with Utah Jazz star Donovan Mitchell to discuss Critical Race Theory and why he thinks it shouldn’t be taught in schools across the country. Utah. [Tribune]

  • Utah leaders are pleading with the public to ditch the fireworks this year amid severe drought and high fire danger. [Tribune]

  • President Joe Biden has pledged to help Western states fight forest fires in the region. [Tribune]

  • Representatives Blake Moore and Chris Stewart voted to remove the Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol, while Representatives John Curtis and Burgess Owens opposed the move. [Tribune]

  • The Utah County commission voted Wednesday to lower taxes, overturning a decision to increase property taxes two years ago. [Tribune]

  • Utah residents are moving into RVs, trailers, or vans due to rising rents and house prices. [Tribune]

National News

  • Alan Weisellberg, the chief financial officer of the Trump Organization, surrendered to authorities Thursday morning after a grand jury indicted him and the company in a tax investigation. [NYT]

  • The House of Representatives has approved the formation of a committee to examine the events and causes of the Jan.6 assault on the U.S. Capitol by a host of supporters of former President Donald Trump. All four representatives from Utah voted against the investigation. [Politico]

  • More than a dozen arrests in connection with the Capitol bombing were announced on Wednesday, the most in a single day. [WaPo]

  • It’s amazing. The New York Times assembled videos of the Capitol Riot to investigate how the attack happened. [NYT]

  • Republican members of Congress have traveled to the US-Mexico border to cheer on former President Trump during his visit to the region. [AP]

  • Donald Rumsfeld, who served under four different presidents, has died at the age of 88. Rumsfeld served two non-consecutive terms as Secretary of Defense and was the youngest and oldest person in that post. [NYT]

  • Recently updated vote numbers show the New York mayoral race is tightening, with Eric Adams ahead of Kathryn Garcia by around 2%. [NYT]

  • Bill Cosby was released from prison after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturned his sexual assault conviction. [CNN]

  • The death toll in the Miami condominium collapse has risen to 18. The bodies of two children were found in the rubble on Wednesday. Hundreds of people are still missing. Rescue work was halted early Thursday morning over fears the rest of the building might collapse [Miami Herald]

  • The horrific heat wave hitting the Pacific Northwest may have already killed hundreds of people. [AP]

  • The Chinese Communist Party celebrated its 100th anniversary. Xi Jinping, the Chinese leader, said countries attempting to “intimidate” China would face stiff resistance. [CNN]

  • Online brokerage firm Robinhood has agreed to pay a $ 70 million fine to settle a regulatory investigation. [WSJ]

  • Every college athlete in the country is now able to earn money through endorsements. On Wednesday, the NCAA suspended rules prohibiting athletes from selling rights to their names, images and likenesses. [ESPN]

A golden birthday

Today is the 50th anniversary of the ratification of the 26th Amendment, which granted the right to vote to 18-year-olds.

The White House issued a proclamation to mark the milestone, which came into effect on July 1, 1971.

Gen Z voters overwhelmingly voted for Joe Biden in 2020, with 65% voting for the Democratic candidate. This was 11% more than any other age group.

Thursday Morning Utah News Roundup

Utah

  • Latter-day Saint leaders can no longer perform civil marriages among nonmembers. [Tribune]

  • Texas Instruments will acquire the Micron chip factory in Lehi for $ 900 million. [DNews]

  • The downtown USPS offices are moving to a new location Thursday. [KUTV]

  • Experts say gas prices will be the highest since 2014 before the holiday weekend. [Standard Examiner]

  • UTA is considering a major expansion of the Ogden facility prior to the completion of the BRT. [Standard Examiner]

COVID-19[feminine

  • L’Utah signale 574 nouveaux cas de COVID-19 – le plus en plus de deux mois. [Tribune]

  • Health care workers, officials concerned about the recent wave of COVID-19. [FOX13]

Legislature

Local government

  • The Summit County official has “zero aspirations” for the Park City mayor’s office after soil criticism. [Park Record]

  • Federal funds could flow into Summit County. [Park Record]

Housing

  • A Utah woman is suing after being evicted from student housing in Orem for “expressing suicidal tendencies.” [Tribune]

  • Habitat for Humanity is completing a house, starting another in the same cul-de-sac. [Daily Herald]

Environment

  • More flash floods are “likely” even as Zion National Park attempts to clean up. [Tribune]

  • Snowbird expects emissions to drop sharply with a new energy system. [KSL]

  • More towns in Weber County are warning against fireworks, with vendors crossing their fingers. [Standard Examiner]

Education

  • American Preparatory Academy ordered to pay $ 2.8 million – this time for real. [KUTV]

  • Salt Lake School Board appoints replacement for former board member facing child pornography charges. [DNews]

  • Ogden High principal named new district superintendent after nationwide search. [KSL]

On opinion pages

  • Robert Gehrke: Romney and Curtis are the Utahns with a chance to mend our broken Congress. [Tribune]

  • Andrew Stoddard: My faith LDS leads me to support equality law. [Tribune]

  • Chris Stewart: Yes, there is a win / win on LGBTQ rights and religious freedom. [DNews]

🎂 You say it’s your birthday? !!

Many happy returns to former Taylorsville Mayor Russ Wall; Ben Horsely, communications director for the Granite School District; and also Bob Springmeyer, president of Bonneville Research

Do you have a birthday that you would like us to recognize in this space? Send us an e-mail.

– Tribune reporter Connor Sanders contributed to this story.



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Owens slams Olympic athlete for protesting flag

Good Wednesday morning Utah! Thanks for reading “The Rundown”.

I want to hear from you! Let me know how to make this newsletter more useful. Email me or find me on Twitter @SchottHappens.

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Owens criticizes Olympic athlete for turning away from American flag

Representative Burgess Owens tore hammer thrower Gwen Berry, who turned away from the American flag during the national anthem during the track and field trials in the United States over the weekend, accusing her of trying to return “His small community of other happy leftists” while disrespecting America.

“She’s going to be a footnote,” Owens said during an appearance on Newsmax. “The only reason to go to the Olympics is to wear red, white and blue and represent your country.”

“If you are ashamed of America, don’t represent America on the international stage,” Owens added.

Berry says playing the national anthem was a “setup.” She claims organizers told her they would play “The Star-Spangled Banner” before she stepped onto the podium with the other qualifiers. Berry turned away from the flag and draped a t-shirt that read “Activist Athlete” over his head as the anthem played.

“The anthem does not speak for me. It never was. Berry told the AP.

Berry, who competed in the 2016 Olympics in Brazil, was sanctioned by the U.S. Olympic Committee after throwing her fist on the podium after winning the hammer throw at the 2019 Pan Am Games. The committee has since apologized to Berry.

Here’s what you need to know for Wednesday

Local News

  • Utah’s coffers are overflowing as state tax revenues exceed forecasts by billions of dollars. This usually means that officials will look to cut taxes, but that might not happen. [Tribune]

  • Utah Representatives Burgess Owens and John Curtis voted against a bill to remove Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol, while Representatives Blake Moore and Chris Stewart voted in favor of the measure. The bill was adopted by 285-120 votes. [WSJ]

  • The Dixie State University Board of Trustees has decided not to change the school’s name to Utah Polytechnic State University. Instead, they recommended Utah Tech University. [Tribune]

  • Second Gentleman Doug Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, will travel to southern Utah this week. [Tribune]

  • Governor Spencer Cox has appointed Marlo M. Oaks as the next state treasurer, replacing David Damschen, who resigned earlier this year. [Tribune]

  • Heavy rains cause flash floods in southern Utah. [Tribune]

National News

  • The Supreme Court rejected a request to lift the national moratorium on evictions due to the pandemic on a restricted vote. [WSJ]

  • Gasoline prices hit a 7-year high due to shortages ahead of the July 4th weekend. [ABC News]

  • The New York mayoral race was plunged into chaos when election officials mistakenly included test results in the latest vote count update. [Politico]

  • Arizona Representative Paul Gosar denied attending a fundraising event with a white nationalist group despite an online invitation promoting their presence. [WaPo]

  • South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem sends 50 National Guard soldiers to the US border with Mexico. A private donation pays for the deployment of a GOP megadonator. [AP]

  • The record-breaking heat wave in the Pacific Northwest sent hundreds of people to hospital. The roads are also deformed in the intense heat. [BuzzFeed]

  • Iranian-backed militias in Syria fired rockets at US troops. US forces responded by firing artillery at the rocket firing positions. [WSJ]

  • Dr Anthony Fauci warns that the COVID-19 Delta variant will create “two Americas” as the gap between vaccinated and unvaccinated areas widens. [CNN]

  • The US real estate market continues to be hot. The average price of homes in major metropolitan areas has increased almost 15% in the past year. [WSJ]

  • Walmart is launching a cheaper version of insulin that will cost around $ 73 per vial. [CNBC]

  • Fox News host Tucker Carlson claimed the National Security Agency was spying on him. The agency basically called Carlson a liar. [Twitter]

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has berated senior officials in that country for failing to prevent a COVID-19 outbreak. [AP]

  • Video of the day: 87-year-old Senator Chuck Grassley pulled off 22 push-ups in a contest against much younger Senator Tom Cotton. [Twitter]

Wednesday Morning Utah News Roundup

Utah

  • A blood shortage could force Utah hospitals to delay procedures. [Tribune]

  • The “unofficial” LGBTQ pride march at BYU draws hundreds of people. [Tribune]

  • Utah is named the most independent state before July 4. [FOX13]

  • What will a gondola look like through Little Cottonwood Canyon? [KSL]

  • Investigators are examining the similarities between several apartment fires. [ABC4]

  • The Summit County Sheriff’s newest patrol sergeant is the first woman on duty. [Park Record]

COVID-19[feminine

  • Près de 1,4 million d’Utahns sont entièrement vaccinés contre le COVID-19. [Tribune]

  • COVID-19 is jeopardizing progress in children’s well-being, according to the KIDS Count report. [DNews]

  • UTA is extending its free rate for COVID-19 vaccinations by 3 months. [Standard Examiner]

Local government

  • SL Co. DA criticizes bills targeting transgender youth. [FOX13]

  • Lehi city council approves partial fireworks ban. [Daily Herald]

  • Orem’s board must decide how to spend $ 16 million. [Daily Herald]

Environment

Education

  • New SLC Schools Superintendent says students need someone like him. [KUTV]

  • Parents of children with disabilities struggle to find inclusive classrooms. [KUTV]

On opinion pages

  • Rachel Rueckert: Accept the bans. Fireworks kill you. [Tribune]

  • I found an apartment, but it certainly wasn’t easy, says the newly arrived Salt Lake Tribune reporter. [Tribune]

🎂 You say it’s your birthday? !!

Happy Birthday to Former State Representative Carl Wimmer and Former State Representative Sheryl Allen.

Do you have a birthday that you would like us to recognize in this space? Send us an e-mail.

– Tribune reporter Connor Sanders contributed to this story.



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