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There is a light that sometimes goes out: the Olympic torch protests | Olympic torch

AAre you sort of, sort of, not really into the fact that the Olympics will still be held later this month in Tokyo despite the coronavirus pandemic and the vast majority of the 7.8 billion inhabitants of our planet are not vaccinated, with alarming epidemics all over the world?

If so, you have a friend in Kayoko Takahashi.

According to Tokyo reporterHitachi’s 53-year-old woman attempted to extinguish the Olympic torch flame as she passed through Mito on her way to the Japanese capital on Sunday by shooting him with a water pistol.

“We are opposed to the Olympics! she can be heard screaming in a video that has since gone viral on social media as she aims for the torch. “Stop the Games! “

Apparently, Takahashi’s opposition stems due to the fact that only 14% of the Japanese population has been fully vaccinated against Covid-19.

Her efforts to extinguish the flame were ultimately unsuccessful, although she was arrested for “deliberately targeting the runner. [carrying the torch] and interfere with the relay, ”Mito deputy police chief Noriaki Nagatsuka told Vice News.

In Takahashi’s defense, it’s actually difficult to put out an Olympic torch. (Unless you’re a real rainstorm, like the one at the 1976 Montreal Games that managed to extinguish the entire stadium’s gigantic flame.) However, many have tried to do so! And often for political reasons. Others took advantage of the torch’s high media visibility to organize other types of events while leaving the flame itself alone. Here are some notable examples from the last decades.

Rio de Janeiro

As the Olympic Torch Relay entered its home stretch towards Rio de Janeiro for the 2016 Games, a young man threw a bucket of water in an ultimately unsuccessful attempt to shut it down.

Angra dos Reis, Brazil

The man was not the only one who tried to put out the torch ahead of the 2016 Games in Brazil. As the flame passed through Angra dos Reis, a group of striking teachers – enraged at the Rio state government for funding the Olympics without paying for them for two months – successfully seized it. turn it off as part of their protest.

Voronezh, Russia

Two years earlier on the torch relay in Sochi, a gay rights activist tried to wave a rainbow flag as the flame passed through Voronezh, presumably to draw attention to the Russian state’s oppression of LGBTQ + people. He was attacked and detained by the police for doing so.

London

As the Olympic torch passed through London en route to the 2008 Beijing Games, a protester tried in vain to turn it off using a literal fire extinguisher.

Paris

French protesters success where this fire extinguisher fan failed, however, managing to extinguish the flame at least three times in an attempt to draw attention to the Chinese government’s record of human rights violations in occupied Tibet.

Juneau, Alaska

And finally, we have … bong tubes for Jesus? Yeah! Bong knocks for Jesus. In 2002, an Alaskan high school student held up a “BONG HITS 4 JESUS” banner beside the Olympic Torch Relay as he passed through Juneau on his way to Salt Lake City. His 10-day suspension gave way to a First Amendment legal battle, culminating in a 2007 Supreme Court ruling in favor of school administrators.



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1,149 weekend COVID-19 cases, 7 deaths, over 13,000 vaccinations reported as Utah hits 70% vaccine target

Jamie Bone, a nurse with the Davis County Department of Health, prepares a syringe of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the Legacy Center Indoor Arena in Farmington on Tuesday, January 12, 2021. Seventy percent of all adults in Utah now have at least a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, Governor Spencer Cox’s office confirmed on Tuesday. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah Department of Health reported the following update on COVID-19 in the state from Saturday to Tuesday:

  • 1,149 new cases
  • 7 deaths
  • 13,878 vaccines administered

The seven-day moving average for positive cases in the state is now 386 per day.

Seventy percent of all adults in Utah now have at least a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, Governor Spencer Cox’s office has confirmed Tuesday, although the state appears to be using outdated demographics to calculate that vaccination rate.

The governor’s office had set a goal of seeing 70% of Utahns aged 18 and over receive at least their first shot of the vaccine by July 4. The state achieved that target on Tuesday.

“This is really a milestone that deserves to be celebrated,” Cox’s office said on Twitter. “Most of all, we are grateful to all the nurses, doctors, healthcare workers, hospitals and volunteers… who continue to work tirelessly to get us all vaccinated!

Since July 4, the Utah Department of Health reported that 65.2% of adults in Utah had received at least their first dose, Cox’s office said. However, that percentage does not include 114,908 doses of the vaccine that were administered in Utah by federal government agencies such as the Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, and Indian Health Services.

With those additional doses, 1,596,999 Utahns received their first dose of vaccine, Cox’s office said. The governor’s office reported that Utah’s adult population was 2,274,774, so about 70.2% of the adult population now has at least their first dose.

“And that number will only increase,” Cox’s office tweeted.

But that’s an older figure for the population of Utah. The United States Census Bureau most recent data estimates the total population of Utah at approximately 3,271,616, of which approximately 948,769, or 29%, are under the age of 18. Using this data, the percentage of Utah adults who receive at least a first dose is closer to 68.75%.

However, Utah executives, including Cox, said the 70% target was somewhat arbitrary. They will continue to work to vaccinate as many people and exceed the statewide target of 70%, the governor’s office added in a statement on Tuesday. Press release.

“Even if we hit 70%, that doesn’t mean it’s the end of the game,” Cox said at a press conference last week.

Cox’s office thanked those who got vaccinated, as well as the Utah Department of Health and local state health departments for their efforts to get as many people vaccinated as possible.

“They have been striving to take the initiative to set up mass vaccination sites statewide and continue to provide vaccines in their communities,” the press release said.

Cox’s office also thanked the Salt Lake Chamber for launching the “Bring it Home” campaign, which encourages companies to support employees who want to get vaccinated.

Cox’s office added that the pandemic is not over and the state is not out of the woods just yet. Utah has seen a small increase in the number of new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, which is believed to be mainly due to the spread of the delta variant among unvaccinated people.

“We are still very concerned about the recent increase in cases and hospitalizations,” the statement said. “And parts of the state, including many of our rural areas and communities of color, remain under 70% immunized.”

This story will be updated.

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Here is the latest Idaho news from the Associated Press at 1:40 a.m. MDT.

PORTLAND, Oregon (AP) – The governor of Oregon has said a heat wave in the Pacific Northwest has killed at least 95 people in that state alone. Democratic Governor Kate Brown told CBS’s “Face the Nation” on Sunday that government officials had warned people of the heat, scattered water to vulnerable people and set up cooling stations. Even so, Brown calls the death toll “absolutely unacceptable.” Hundreds of people are believed to have died from the heat over the past week in the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. Record temperatures included 116 degrees in Portland and 108 in Seattle. Warm weather is heading east, with temperatures well above 100 predicted Sunday for parts of Idaho and Montana.

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – Wildlife officials say a rare animal spotted in a Utah neighborhood is likely on the move looking for a new place to live. The Salt Lake Tribune reports that a home doorbell camera captured the wolverine on video Thursday in West Layton about 15 miles west of Salt Lake City. Utah Wildlife Division officials believe it is the same animal seen on nearby Antelope Island in early May. Wolverines have only been seen six times in Utah. The last time before this year was in 2016. Wolverines look like a combination of skunk and bear and can reach 40 pounds.

KETCHUM, Idaho (AP) – The Nature Conservancy has closed its Silver Creek reserve in central Idaho to fishing due to low water levels and extreme heat. The Idaho Mountain Express reports that the group announced the closure Thursday night. The reserve is one of the most popular trout fishing destinations in the region. The Nature Conservancy says the water temperature recently hit 73 degrees. Warm water means less dissolved oxygen for the fish. The group says closing the reserve to fishing will reduce stress on fish when they experience prolonged stressful conditions. There is no estimate of when fishing might be re-authorized.

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) – Observers say the housing boom in metro Spokane, Wash., Is a problem of numbers. Far too many people are moving in, far too few homes are being built and prices have skyrocketed to unprecedented levels. In May, the Wall Street Journal / realtor.com Emerging Housing Markets Index ranked Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, which is part of that combined metropolitan statistical area, as having the fastest rising home prices in the country. Spokane County came in at No.5. The median price of homes in Spokane County in May was $ 375,000, up 29% from the median of $ 289,900 in May 2020.


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Family history library to reopen with some changes

The research center took advantage of the closures linked to COVID-19 to renovate itself.

(Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) The Family History Library will begin a gradual reopening on July 6 with limited hours from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Hours will stretch from there, so check the Family History Library website for the most recent visitor information.

When the Family History Library in downtown Salt Lake City reopens on July 6, visitors will find it’s not quite their memory.

The Family History Library, owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, closed in March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

But the church used this time to renovate itself, adding improved technology, better lighting, new office book scanners, expanded space for interactive experiences and more, according to a recent one. FamilySearch blog post.

The Family History Library will begin a gradual reopening on July 6 with limited hours from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Hours will stretch from there, so check the Family history library website for the most recent visitor information.

Local FamilySearch libraries and family history centers will open based on direction from church leaders and government direction. Remote services are always available.

According to the blog post, each of the library’s five floors has been revamped to improve the space and help visitors find what they’re looking for.

On all floors, referral desks have been relocated in front of elevators, and new desks also serve clients better, as per the guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The remodel also added “a lot more” shelves to accommodate more than 40,000 volumes, the blog says.

Many visitor computer stations now have two or three monitors, and all stations can accommodate visitors’ laptops. Up-to-date microfilm readers and scanners now work with the computers of many visitor workstations so that visitors can examine books and microfilm and make copies of digital images at their workstations, rather than going to a shop. designated scan or copy area.

Other changes include computer stations redistributed to make room for expanded research equipment and an expanded break room with a small kitchenette and ice maker for guests.


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Yes, the forest fire danger is really that bad • Salt Lake Magazine

I know. I know. You want to be able to light fireworks with your friends and family on Independence Day. And, let’s be honest, no one is going to stop you. While some cities have stricter restrictions on fireworks than others, there is no general ban on fireworks in Utah (unless you are on public land). For the most part, unless your city has unique restrictions, you’re safe as long as you turn them on July 2-5 (or July 22-25 for the Pioneer Day holiday).

But just because you can get away with it, right? It’s dry there. Most of the state is subject to extreme drought, creating the perfect conditions for wildfires to start and spread quickly.

According to the Bureau of Land Management, already this year, people have started up to 370 forest fires in Utah. It is 370 forest fires that could have been avoided. At a press conference on Wednesday, Utah Gov. Spencer Cox said 81 percent of this year’s wildfires, which burned 23,000 acres, were man-made. Fireworks sparked 65 forest fires last year. This does not include city fires caused by fireworks.

Many fire chiefs and leaders of state and local governments are begging members of the public to forgo any personal fireworks this year, imploring them instead to see a show put on by their community. So if they’re all so against the people lighting fireworks this year, why not ban it outright?

On this point, the governor says his hands are tied. At that same press conference, he criticized state law for not giving him the power to ban fireworks. Most towns and cities also fail an outright ban, also pointing out that state law prohibits them from doing so. (The notable exception is Mayor Erin Mendenhall, who enacted a ban on personal fireworks throughout Salt Lake City.)

Although pointing fingers is a very mature way of dealing with the situation, it almost the impression that no one wants to be held responsible for taking away the people’s fireworks (even during the state’s record drought).


Here is a list of local fireworks restrictions to see what your city allows and Salt lake the magazine’s story about where you can catch a community fireworks show on July 4th, instead of starting your own airborne wildfires.


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Was Trump one of the worst presidents of all time?

Good Thursday morning Utah! Welcome to July and thank you for reading “The Rundown”.

📬 Do you have a tip? Some interesting political gossip? Do you just want to discuss politics? Email me or find me on Twitter @SchottHappens.

Receive this newsletter in your inbox every morning of the week. Sign up for free here.

Was Trump one of the worst presidents of all time?

If more than 140 presidential historians are to be believed, former President Donald Trump will become one of the worst presidents in history.

Trump ranked 41st out of 44 presidents in quadrennial survey of historians made by C-SPAN. Only Franklin Pierce, Andrew Johnson and James Buchannan ranked lower. Trump was ranked behind William Henry Harrison, who had only been in office for a month, Zachary Taylor, who served just over a year, and James Garfield, who died from an assassin bullet. months after his inauguration.

Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Franklin and Teddy Roosevelt were at the top of the list. The first 5 are unchanged from the last poll.

Historians have been asked to rank CEOs on 10 characteristics. Trump ranked first in public persuasion (# 32) and economic management (# 34). Trump ranked dead last among presidents in terms of moral authority and administrative skills. His constant time of lies and turmoil in the White House probably had something to do with his low ranking.

Ronald Reagan placed 9th overall, just ahead of Barack Obama, who was 10th. Obama was ranked 12th in the 2017 survey.

Here’s what you need to know for Thursday morning

Utah News

  • The leader of the Utah Republican Party wants to sit down with Utah Jazz star Donovan Mitchell to discuss Critical Race Theory and why he thinks it shouldn’t be taught in schools across the country. Utah. [Tribune]

  • Utah leaders are pleading with the public to ditch the fireworks this year amid severe drought and high fire danger. [Tribune]

  • President Joe Biden has pledged to help Western states fight forest fires in the region. [Tribune]

  • Representatives Blake Moore and Chris Stewart voted to remove the Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol, while Representatives John Curtis and Burgess Owens opposed the move. [Tribune]

  • The Utah County commission voted Wednesday to lower taxes, overturning a decision to increase property taxes two years ago. [Tribune]

  • Utah residents are moving into RVs, trailers, or vans due to rising rents and house prices. [Tribune]

National News

  • Alan Weisellberg, the chief financial officer of the Trump Organization, surrendered to authorities Thursday morning after a grand jury indicted him and the company in a tax investigation. [NYT]

  • The House of Representatives has approved the formation of a committee to examine the events and causes of the Jan.6 assault on the U.S. Capitol by a host of supporters of former President Donald Trump. All four representatives from Utah voted against the investigation. [Politico]

  • More than a dozen arrests in connection with the Capitol bombing were announced on Wednesday, the most in a single day. [WaPo]

  • It’s amazing. The New York Times assembled videos of the Capitol Riot to investigate how the attack happened. [NYT]

  • Republican members of Congress have traveled to the US-Mexico border to cheer on former President Trump during his visit to the region. [AP]

  • Donald Rumsfeld, who served under four different presidents, has died at the age of 88. Rumsfeld served two non-consecutive terms as Secretary of Defense and was the youngest and oldest person in that post. [NYT]

  • Recently updated vote numbers show the New York mayoral race is tightening, with Eric Adams ahead of Kathryn Garcia by around 2%. [NYT]

  • Bill Cosby was released from prison after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturned his sexual assault conviction. [CNN]

  • The death toll in the Miami condominium collapse has risen to 18. The bodies of two children were found in the rubble on Wednesday. Hundreds of people are still missing. Rescue work was halted early Thursday morning over fears the rest of the building might collapse [Miami Herald]

  • The horrific heat wave hitting the Pacific Northwest may have already killed hundreds of people. [AP]

  • The Chinese Communist Party celebrated its 100th anniversary. Xi Jinping, the Chinese leader, said countries attempting to “intimidate” China would face stiff resistance. [CNN]

  • Online brokerage firm Robinhood has agreed to pay a $ 70 million fine to settle a regulatory investigation. [WSJ]

  • Every college athlete in the country is now able to earn money through endorsements. On Wednesday, the NCAA suspended rules prohibiting athletes from selling rights to their names, images and likenesses. [ESPN]

A golden birthday

Today is the 50th anniversary of the ratification of the 26th Amendment, which granted the right to vote to 18-year-olds.

The White House issued a proclamation to mark the milestone, which came into effect on July 1, 1971.

Gen Z voters overwhelmingly voted for Joe Biden in 2020, with 65% voting for the Democratic candidate. This was 11% more than any other age group.

Thursday Morning Utah News Roundup

Utah

  • Latter-day Saint leaders can no longer perform civil marriages among nonmembers. [Tribune]

  • Texas Instruments will acquire the Micron chip factory in Lehi for $ 900 million. [DNews]

  • The downtown USPS offices are moving to a new location Thursday. [KUTV]

  • Experts say gas prices will be the highest since 2014 before the holiday weekend. [Standard Examiner]

  • UTA is considering a major expansion of the Ogden facility prior to the completion of the BRT. [Standard Examiner]

COVID-19[feminine

  • L’Utah signale 574 nouveaux cas de COVID-19 – le plus en plus de deux mois. [Tribune]

  • Health care workers, officials concerned about the recent wave of COVID-19. [FOX13]

Legislature

Local government

  • The Summit County official has “zero aspirations” for the Park City mayor’s office after soil criticism. [Park Record]

  • Federal funds could flow into Summit County. [Park Record]

Housing

  • A Utah woman is suing after being evicted from student housing in Orem for “expressing suicidal tendencies.” [Tribune]

  • Habitat for Humanity is completing a house, starting another in the same cul-de-sac. [Daily Herald]

Environment

  • More flash floods are “likely” even as Zion National Park attempts to clean up. [Tribune]

  • Snowbird expects emissions to drop sharply with a new energy system. [KSL]

  • More towns in Weber County are warning against fireworks, with vendors crossing their fingers. [Standard Examiner]

Education

  • American Preparatory Academy ordered to pay $ 2.8 million – this time for real. [KUTV]

  • Salt Lake School Board appoints replacement for former board member facing child pornography charges. [DNews]

  • Ogden High principal named new district superintendent after nationwide search. [KSL]

On opinion pages

  • Robert Gehrke: Romney and Curtis are the Utahns with a chance to mend our broken Congress. [Tribune]

  • Andrew Stoddard: My faith LDS leads me to support equality law. [Tribune]

  • Chris Stewart: Yes, there is a win / win on LGBTQ rights and religious freedom. [DNews]

🎂 You say it’s your birthday? !!

Many happy returns to former Taylorsville Mayor Russ Wall; Ben Horsely, communications director for the Granite School District; and also Bob Springmeyer, president of Bonneville Research

Do you have a birthday that you would like us to recognize in this space? Send us an e-mail.

– Tribune reporter Connor Sanders contributed to this story.



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Owens slams Olympic athlete for protesting flag

Good Wednesday morning Utah! Thanks for reading “The Rundown”.

I want to hear from you! Let me know how to make this newsletter more useful. Email me or find me on Twitter @SchottHappens.

Get this newsletter delivered to your inbox every morning of the week. Sign up for free here.

Owens criticizes Olympic athlete for turning away from American flag

Representative Burgess Owens tore hammer thrower Gwen Berry, who turned away from the American flag during the national anthem during the track and field trials in the United States over the weekend, accusing her of trying to return “His small community of other happy leftists” while disrespecting America.

“She’s going to be a footnote,” Owens said during an appearance on Newsmax. “The only reason to go to the Olympics is to wear red, white and blue and represent your country.”

“If you are ashamed of America, don’t represent America on the international stage,” Owens added.

Berry says playing the national anthem was a “setup.” She claims organizers told her they would play “The Star-Spangled Banner” before she stepped onto the podium with the other qualifiers. Berry turned away from the flag and draped a t-shirt that read “Activist Athlete” over his head as the anthem played.

“The anthem does not speak for me. It never was. Berry told the AP.

Berry, who competed in the 2016 Olympics in Brazil, was sanctioned by the U.S. Olympic Committee after throwing her fist on the podium after winning the hammer throw at the 2019 Pan Am Games. The committee has since apologized to Berry.

Here’s what you need to know for Wednesday

Local News

  • Utah’s coffers are overflowing as state tax revenues exceed forecasts by billions of dollars. This usually means that officials will look to cut taxes, but that might not happen. [Tribune]

  • Utah Representatives Burgess Owens and John Curtis voted against a bill to remove Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol, while Representatives Blake Moore and Chris Stewart voted in favor of the measure. The bill was adopted by 285-120 votes. [WSJ]

  • The Dixie State University Board of Trustees has decided not to change the school’s name to Utah Polytechnic State University. Instead, they recommended Utah Tech University. [Tribune]

  • Second Gentleman Doug Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, will travel to southern Utah this week. [Tribune]

  • Governor Spencer Cox has appointed Marlo M. Oaks as the next state treasurer, replacing David Damschen, who resigned earlier this year. [Tribune]

  • Heavy rains cause flash floods in southern Utah. [Tribune]

National News

  • The Supreme Court rejected a request to lift the national moratorium on evictions due to the pandemic on a restricted vote. [WSJ]

  • Gasoline prices hit a 7-year high due to shortages ahead of the July 4th weekend. [ABC News]

  • The New York mayoral race was plunged into chaos when election officials mistakenly included test results in the latest vote count update. [Politico]

  • Arizona Representative Paul Gosar denied attending a fundraising event with a white nationalist group despite an online invitation promoting their presence. [WaPo]

  • South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem sends 50 National Guard soldiers to the US border with Mexico. A private donation pays for the deployment of a GOP megadonator. [AP]

  • The record-breaking heat wave in the Pacific Northwest sent hundreds of people to hospital. The roads are also deformed in the intense heat. [BuzzFeed]

  • Iranian-backed militias in Syria fired rockets at US troops. US forces responded by firing artillery at the rocket firing positions. [WSJ]

  • Dr Anthony Fauci warns that the COVID-19 Delta variant will create “two Americas” as the gap between vaccinated and unvaccinated areas widens. [CNN]

  • The US real estate market continues to be hot. The average price of homes in major metropolitan areas has increased almost 15% in the past year. [WSJ]

  • Walmart is launching a cheaper version of insulin that will cost around $ 73 per vial. [CNBC]

  • Fox News host Tucker Carlson claimed the National Security Agency was spying on him. The agency basically called Carlson a liar. [Twitter]

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has berated senior officials in that country for failing to prevent a COVID-19 outbreak. [AP]

  • Video of the day: 87-year-old Senator Chuck Grassley pulled off 22 push-ups in a contest against much younger Senator Tom Cotton. [Twitter]

Wednesday Morning Utah News Roundup

Utah

  • A blood shortage could force Utah hospitals to delay procedures. [Tribune]

  • The “unofficial” LGBTQ pride march at BYU draws hundreds of people. [Tribune]

  • Utah is named the most independent state before July 4. [FOX13]

  • What will a gondola look like through Little Cottonwood Canyon? [KSL]

  • Investigators are examining the similarities between several apartment fires. [ABC4]

  • The Summit County Sheriff’s newest patrol sergeant is the first woman on duty. [Park Record]

COVID-19[feminine

  • Près de 1,4 million d’Utahns sont entièrement vaccinés contre le COVID-19. [Tribune]

  • COVID-19 is jeopardizing progress in children’s well-being, according to the KIDS Count report. [DNews]

  • UTA is extending its free rate for COVID-19 vaccinations by 3 months. [Standard Examiner]

Local government

  • SL Co. DA criticizes bills targeting transgender youth. [FOX13]

  • Lehi city council approves partial fireworks ban. [Daily Herald]

  • Orem’s board must decide how to spend $ 16 million. [Daily Herald]

Environment

Education

  • New SLC Schools Superintendent says students need someone like him. [KUTV]

  • Parents of children with disabilities struggle to find inclusive classrooms. [KUTV]

On opinion pages

  • Rachel Rueckert: Accept the bans. Fireworks kill you. [Tribune]

  • I found an apartment, but it certainly wasn’t easy, says the newly arrived Salt Lake Tribune reporter. [Tribune]

🎂 You say it’s your birthday? !!

Happy Birthday to Former State Representative Carl Wimmer and Former State Representative Sheryl Allen.

Do you have a birthday that you would like us to recognize in this space? Send us an e-mail.

– Tribune reporter Connor Sanders contributed to this story.



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Olympian’s company received $ 10 million in pandemic bailout despite conflicting figures

PARK CITY, Utah – Allison Baver had a dream come true when she won an Olympic medal in short track speed skating.

In October 2019, she set her sights on the film and television industry by incorporating her own production company. When the pandemic arrived months later, Baver was among the business owners who sought help from the Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP.

The Small Business Administration reports that the average PPP loan was $ 206,000. Allison Baver Entertainment received the maximum amount of the program – $ 10 million.

Why Baver Entertainment needed so much is unclear. By email, Baver declined to answer FOX 13 questions and said she was not available until the end of July. Neither Baver nor anyone associated with his company has been charged with any crimes.

On social media, Baver recently posted articles saying she was visiting film festivals and filming locations.

According to data released by the Small Business Administration, which administers the PPP, Baver Entertainment said $ 8.6 million in aid was for payroll. The company said it has 430 employees.

But Baver Entertainment was telling the Utah Department of Workforce Services that it has between one and four employees.

The lower numbers would be more typical of a production company, says Marshall Moore, vice president of operations at Utah Film Studios in Park City. Production companies will hire more workers — actors, crew and support staff — when they shoot.

“You’ll get small budgets under a million dollars and sometimes they’ll work with 30 to 50 people,” Moore said. “And then you can go further. “

“Over a million dollars, 5 million to 10 million dollars, sometimes these teams are about 120 people and that includes the producers, the cameramen, the handles, the electricity,” he added.

What would it take to employ more than 400?

“I mean, for me it would be ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’,” Moore said. “It would be Marvel.”

The P3 is often described as a loan, but the loan can be canceled if the recipient maintains their payroll and only uses the money for other approved expenses, including utilities and rent or mortgage. Candidates were supposed to describe the expenses they had in February 2020.

“The purpose of the Paycheque Protection Program was to reduce unemployment,” said Richard Gordon, professor of law at Case Western Reserve University and director of its financial integrity unit.

He says the PPP did not require banks processing applications to verify that the borrower was telling the truth about their employees and their needs.

With the PPP, “the US government is actually the co-signer,” Gordon said. “So if the borrower doesn’t pay the US government back, that is, we, the taxpayer, will eventually pay off the loan.”

Baver is a native of Pennsylvania who moved to Utah to train. She made three Olympic teams. Baver won a bronze medal with a relay team at the 2010 Games.

For the PPP loan, Baver Entertainment turned to Pennsylvania-based Meridian Bank to process its request. The bank’s CEO declined to discuss the app with FOX 13.

Baver Entertainment has production credit this year for a drama starring actor Elijah Wood titled “No Man of God”. IMDB says Baver Entertainment provided funding.

Gordon, who hasn’t researched Baver Entertainment and only talks in general, said PPP can’t be used as capital to grow. He also doesn’t think funding for a film would be allowed under the PPP unless everyone on set is on the recipient’s payroll in February 2020.

“I think Congress could have made this pretty close to the absence of fraud if it was handled by the Internal Revenue Service,” Gordon said.

The IRS “knows our employees. They know exactly how much they are paid because they know how much they are being withheld. Only three other Utah companies have received $ 10 million, according to a Salt Lake Tribune analysis of PPP data. These three were all in business long before Baver Entertainment.

Some more established production companies have received much less from the PPP. The Jim Henson Co. asked for $ 2.3 million and said it has 110 employees.

New Regency Productions, the film company behind films such as “The Revenant,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” and the latest release of “Little Women,” received $ 1 million and reported 50 employees.

In December, Variety attributed to Baver that his upcoming productions included a horror comedy now called “Monsters.” When FOX 13 reached out to the writer-director named in the article, his rep responded by saying that the project had been put on hold when the pandemic arrived and they had heard nothing more.

Baver also told the news site that his company was working on a horror film called “Dead Princess”. Production was halted by the pandemic and is expected to resume this year.

Baver Entertainment’s listed address is the former Olympian’s townhouse in Taylorsville. According to documents filed with the Salt Lake County Recorder, the Baver Homeowners Association filed a notice in January 2020 that the townhouse was behind on its fees; the HOA was planning to sell the property to settle the debt.

In July 2020, about three months after Baver Entertainment received the $ 10 million, the HOA filed a new notice stating that the debt had been paid. The sale was canceled.


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Drought issues in dry western US raise fears of July 4th fireworks

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – Many Americans seeking normalcy as pandemic restrictions end are anxiously awaiting the traditional July 4 fireworks display. But with a historic drought in the western United States and fears of another devastating wildfire season, authorities are canceling exhibits, banning setting off fireworks, or calling for caution.

Fireworks have already caused a few small wildfires, including one started by a child in northern Utah and another in central California. Last year, a pyrotechnic device designed to celebrate a baby’s gender reveal sparked a fire in California that killed a firefighter during a season of wildfires in the United States that burned the second largest land area in nearly 40 years.

Parts of the American West are experiencing their worst drought conditions in more than a century this year, said Jennifer Balch, director of the Earth Lab at the University of Colorado. People setting off fireworks in the home are of concern due to both the powder magazine conditions conducive to wildfire outbreaks and the threat of injury. Last year, injuries hit their highest level in 15 years after the pandemic canceled large gatherings, federal data showed.

“As a fire specialist, I am preparing for this fire season due to the drought and heat already present,” Balch said. “I think the fireworks right now is a terrible idea.”

Fireworks industry professionals, who have also stressed caution in drought-prone areas, expect strong sales despite a shortage caused by pandemic-related manufacturing downturns and disruptions commercial.

“We think we’re going to have a great year,” said James Fuller, a fireworks safety expert at Alabama-based TNT Fireworks.

While fireworks are an integral part of the nation’s Independence Day celebrations, they light thousands of fires a year, including one that burned down Bobbie Uno’s home in Clearfield, Utah, l ‘last year. She had to jump out of the way before it hit the side of her house.

“In five seconds my house, from the bushes to the roof, was on fire,” Uno said. The fire caused $ 60,000 in damage and forced her family out of their home for weeks.

“I want everyone to be aware of the danger because it’s scary even in a little cul-de-sac,” Uno said.

Several Utah cities are banning people from setting off their own fireworks this year during the record drought, but many Republicans are against a statewide ban. Salt Lake County Councilor Aimee Winder Newton supports the restrictions but thinks this year is a bad time for a blanket ban.

“We’re just coming out of this pandemic where people already felt like the government was restraining them in so many ways,” she said. “When you pronounce bans arbitrarily, we might have a situation where people who weren’t going to light fireworks will voluntarily buy fireworks just to send a message to the government.”

State fireworks laws vary widely across the United States, but local bans on personal fireworks are appearing from Montana to Oregon, which has been hit by massive wildfires the last year.

In Arizona, already ravaged by more than a dozen wildfires, many cities have called off their public fireworks displays. The Yavapai-Apache Nation typically holds an exhibit outside of their casino near Camp Verde in central Arizona.

“This year, with worse conditions than last year, we decided in May that we would not have fireworks,” said James Perry, spokesperson for the tribe’s Cliff Castle Casino Hotel. “Based on the large fires currently burning in and around our community, we are happy with our decision. “

It’s a similar story in Colorado, where dozens of shows have been scuttled, most notably in Steamboat Springs, a ski town where firefighters are already scattered around.

“The grass always catches fire… why are we doing something that causes fire when fire is our biggest problem?” Said Winnie DelliQuadri, the city’s special projects manager.

But in neighboring Wyoming, business is booming in fireworks shops, including sales of banned items elsewhere. Parking lots fill up on weekends and many cars have foreign license plates.

“It’s not just Colorado,” said Ben Laws, director of Pyro City. “We see people from Nebraska, we see people from Montana, we see people from all over come and buy.”

Other cities, including Boise, Idaho and Santa Fe, New Mexico, are working to ban personal fireworks while keeping their exhibits public, where safety precautions are often stricter and firefighters are in alert.

In North Dakota, where more than two-thirds of the state experiences extreme or exceptional drought – the two worst categories – some areas are passing local bans. In South Dakota, where conditions are a little less difficult, the governor is fighting the federal government to organize a fireworks display at Mount Rushmore.

A show that draws tens of thousands of people to Lake Tahoe, Nevada, near the California state border, was initially canceled for the second year in a row, but organizers subsequently decided to host an “experience of smaller and safer fireworks “. Holding fireworks over the water is one of the safest ways to celebrate, said Professor Balch.

The industry is urging people who light their own fireworks to follow local restrictions, choose a flat location a safe distance from homes, have a source of water on hand to extinguish used products and dispose of with care.

Some security officials would prefer people to avoid lighting their own fireworks all together. Michele Steinberg of the National Fire Protection Association pointed to federal data showing 15,600 Americans attended emergency rooms with fireworks-related injuries last year, thousands more than the year before.

“I love watching fireworks, but honestly they’re not safe in the hands of consumers,” she said. “Even a sparkler can reach up to 1,200 degrees, which is actually the heat of a forest fire.”

___

Associated Press editors Felicia Fonseca in Flagstaff, Arizona; Mead Gruver in Cheyenne, Wyoming; Cedar Attanasio in Santa Fe, New Mexico; Scott Sonner in Reno, Nevada; and Associated Press / Report for America, Corps member Patty Nieberg in Denver, contributed to this report.

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Salt lake city government

PM Newsletter: Asylum Discrimination, Pioneer Park Map and Trauma at Boarding School

Friday evening June 25, 2021

state

US Department of Justice rules on behalf of asylum in discrimination case

The US Department of Justice settled a discrimination claim with a Utah company. Easterseals-Goodwill is based in Montana but has offices throughout the region, including Utah. A woman filed a complaint against the office here, claiming that her proof of work documents were illegally rejected. She said she was asked to provide additional documents to verify her eligibility to work due to her immigration status. She was asking for asylum in the country. Other non-US citizens have been urged to do the same. As part of the settlement, ESGW was ordered to pay approximately $ 6,200 in civil penalties. They also need to review their policies and train their employees on anti-discrimination laws. – Ross Terrell

SCOTUS rules on exemption from the Air Quality Act

More small refineries can apply for exemptions from certain renewable fuels requirements that are part of the Clean Air Act. That’s from a 6-3 U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Friday. The court ruled that a small refinery that had already been granted a hardship exemption can get an extension. This is even if the refinery allowed a previous exemption to expire. The Biden administration argued that in order to get an extension, a refinery had to maintain a continuous exemption since 2011. Refineries in Wyoming, Utah and Oklahoma have argued that siding with the Biden administration would eliminate the exemption for most small refineries in the United States. – Associated press

Northern Utah

Little Cottonwood Canyon Traffic Plan Update

The Utah Department of Transportation has accepted two proposals to reduce traffic in Little Cottonwood Canyon, the often congested road from the Salt Lake Valley to Alta and Snowbird ski resorts. The two finalists increased the bus service while widening the route or a gondola above the canyon. Josh Van Jura of U-DOT said each proposal serves a different purpose: speed or reliability. The bus is the fastest option, while the gondola offers more regular travel times. The decision comes after three years and 124 initial proposals. The public now has 45 days to weigh in on their preferred option. Read the full story. Jon reed

Salt Lake Valley fire chiefs ask people not to use personal fireworks

Salt Lake Valley fire chiefs are asking people not to use personal fireworks this year. They are just the latest group to call for restraint due to Utah’s extreme drought and dry conditions. The governor and other elected officials have done it too. In a video released on Friday, chiefs across the valley said responding to fireworks incidents prevented them from being able to respond to medical emergencies. Last year alone, they were needed for over 650 fireworks-related calls. People are encouraged to view public postings only. If you are caught lighting fireworks illegally, you can be fined up to $ 1,000. You may also be held responsible for the cost of fighting fires and any damage that occurs. – Ross Terrell

Salt Lake City Seeking Pioneer Park Reviews

Salt Lake City is seeking public input on the revitalization of Pioneer Park. The city launched a poll on Friday to gauge what the public expects from the downtown park. He also organizes a field day and a movie night on Saturdays. The park is home to the city’s weekly farmer’s market. It is also traditionally a gathering place for people experiencing homelessness in the city. Earlier this month, a woman was stabbed in the park. Police arrived and shot the man after charging the officers with a knife. The investigation will be open until July 21. – Caroline ballard

Region / Nation

Supporters of worried history of boarding schools can lead to trauma

News of another unmarked mass grave discovered at a residential school has had an emotional impact on residential school survivors and their loved ones in the United States. But mental health care resources for survivors and their loved ones are limited due to severe underfunding of the Indian Federal Health Service. Advocates call on the Home Office to increase funding before asking survivors to share their stories. Crisis counseling services are available to those dealing with the news on the Residential School Survivors’ website and hotline. – Savannah Maher, Mountain West Press Office

Navajo President Jonathan Nez comments on anonymous graves

The US Department of the Interior announced this week that it would investigate the residential schools it ran for Native American children in the 19th and 20th centuries. It follows the discovery of hundreds of anonymous graves at a residential school for Indigenous students in Canada. Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez told KUER he was happy the United States was paying attention to a dark period in its history. “Put these types of stories in the textbooks of every school across the country so people know what indigenous people went through,” Nez said. The US government operated a residential school for native children in Brigham City, Utah, from 1950 to 1984. Children from several tribes, including the Navajo nation, were sent there. Listen to the full interview with Nez here. – Kate Groetzinger, Bluff


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