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Mary Cashion

Utah economy

Even before the assassination of Jovenel Moïse, Haiti was in crisis

The assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse at his home threatens to exacerbate Haiti’s already endemic problems.

“Anything that could go wrong seems to go wrong,” said Robert fatton, an expert on Haitian politics at the University of Virginia, and originally from Haiti itself.

The western part of the island of Hispaniola, Haiti is perched in the Caribbean just 600 miles southeast of Florida. He overthrew French rule with a successful revolt, becoming the first republic ruled by blacks in 1804.

The United States has a long history of intervention there: it occupied Haiti from 1915 to 1934. The United States sent the Marines twice in the past three decades to restore order under President Bill Clinton , then again under President George W. Bush.

Even before Moïse’s assassination on Wednesday morning, Haiti was in crisis: political instability, the lasting effects of a devastating earthquake and cholera epidemic, foreign political interference and gang violence all pervaded wreaks havoc.

“You have this situation where the institutions are not functioning, where the economy is stagnating (…) politics has been extremely volatile. The current government has been challenged by the population. There have been massive accusations of corruption,” Fatton said. “So you name it, in terms of instability and institutional decay, you have it right now in Haiti.”

The country faces a constitutional crisis

Francois Pierre Louis, an expert on Haitian politics at Queens College at the City University of New York, said he was not very surprised to learn of Moses’ murder.

Moses had stripped rival political parties, businessmen and great families of power. “He made a lot of enemies. [The attack] could come from anywhere. And he has alienated too many people, “Pierre-Louis, from Haiti, told NPR.

Moses took office in 2017 after a protracted and contested election. He had never held political office before; he was a businessman who had enriched himself as a fruit exporter.

The opposition said his term should have ended in February, but Moïse said since it took him a year to officially take office, his term should be extended until 2022.

The 53-year-old president had ruled by decree for over a year when he was assassinated, after dissolving parliament and failing to hold legislative elections.

On July 1, the United Nations Security Council issued a declaration expressing “its deep concern regarding the deterioration of political, security and humanitarian conditions in Haiti”.

Moïse also proposed a referendum on changes to Haiti’s constitution.

Among others, the UN Explain, the constitutional changes desired by Moses would allow the president to run for two consecutive five-year terms without a currently stipulated break. It would also effectively abolish the Haitian Senate and establish a vice president who would report to the president, instead of a prime minister. He called for free and fair elections in 2021, when they are scheduled.

But not everyone thinks it’s even possible right now. “Many civil society organizations in Haiti – and I think rightly – claim that you cannot have elections in the current climate, which is one of very high instability and insecurity,” he said. said Fatton.

He still struggles to recover from a crippling earthquake

In 2010, Haiti was devastated by an earthquake, the main shock of which shook the ground for nearly 30 seconds. At least 220,000 people are estimated to have died and some 1.5 million people have been displaced. “About 300,000 were injured and much of the country was buried under tons of twisted metal and concrete,” according to NPR. reported.

The earthquake destroyed Haiti’s infrastructure. And this infrastructure has not yet been really rebuilt.

“People are still traumatized by the earthquake. They have lost members of their family, ”says Pierre-Louis. “They couldn’t rebuild because they don’t have an income. And then you have generations of people who are gone.”

A devastating cholera epidemic

This earthquake was followed by another deadly force: cholera.

As Jason Beaubien of NPR reported in 2016, “UN peacekeepers inadvertently brought cholera to Haiti in 2010 just after the devastating earthquake. The epidemic, which is still ongoing, sickened nearly 800,000 people and killed nearly 9,000. Before 2010, cholera had not been reported in Haiti for decades. “

The UN apologized for its role in the cholera epidemic in 2016. Yet, as Pierre-Louis notes: “People were not compensated for the loss of family members who were supporting family.

Gangs are multiplying

Gangs have become a scourge in the capital Port-au-Prince. A recent UN report mentionned 5,000 people had been displaced by gang violence in the first 10 days of June alone.

“The violence has left several people dead or injured, as rival gangs fight to exert control over populated areas like Martissant, Cité-Soleil and Bel Air. Hundreds of homes and small businesses have also been set on fire,” said UN police stations were also attacked by armed assailants.

Some areas of Port-au-Prince are not even accessible because gangs control them, Fatton says, reflecting the government’s inability to govern. “And these areas are very close, in fact, to the seats of power, to the presidential palace, to the Legislative Assembly,” he said.

Haiti has yet to deliver vaccine doses as COVID rises

Haiti is the poorest country in Latin America and the Caribbean, and is one of the poorest countries in the world, according to at the World Bank.

Almost half of the population needs immediate food aid, according to to the United Nations World Food Program.

Hurricane Matthew hit the country in 2016, further damaging the country’s economy. More than 90 percent of the Haitian population is extremely vulnerable to natural disasters, according to the World Bank.

The country has seen a recent resurgence of COVID-19. It is also one of the few countries that has yet to administer a dose of the vaccine, Reuters reports.

“It’s a climate of insecurity,” says Fatton.

There is a power struggle

It is not yet clear who is responsible for the murder of Moses. But Pierre-Louis believes that a possible narrative in his murder is the fight between the incoming elite of Moses and the old elite.

“He was trying to dispossess several people in Haiti who have long been well known as businessmen in Haiti,” he said. “You always have that in Haiti, where when a person becomes president, that’s how the person tries to accumulate wealth: by using the resources of the state, by using other means to dispossess others. who already have wealth and power.

Yet Fatton says an assassination is a new phenomenon in modern Haitian politics. While Haiti’s first independent ruler was assassinated in 1806, such violence has not been typical in the country’s modern era.

“It was a very brutal and shocking event,” says Fatton.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.
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Salt lake city government

There is a light that sometimes goes out: the Olympic torch protests | Olympic torch

AAre you sort of, sort of, not really into the fact that the Olympics will still be held later this month in Tokyo despite the coronavirus pandemic and the vast majority of the 7.8 billion inhabitants of our planet are not vaccinated, with alarming epidemics all over the world?

If so, you have a friend in Kayoko Takahashi.

According to Tokyo reporterHitachi’s 53-year-old woman attempted to extinguish the Olympic torch flame as she passed through Mito on her way to the Japanese capital on Sunday by shooting him with a water pistol.

“We are opposed to the Olympics! she can be heard screaming in a video that has since gone viral on social media as she aims for the torch. “Stop the Games! “

Apparently, Takahashi’s opposition stems due to the fact that only 14% of the Japanese population has been fully vaccinated against Covid-19.

Her efforts to extinguish the flame were ultimately unsuccessful, although she was arrested for “deliberately targeting the runner. [carrying the torch] and interfere with the relay, ”Mito deputy police chief Noriaki Nagatsuka told Vice News.

In Takahashi’s defense, it’s actually difficult to put out an Olympic torch. (Unless you’re a real rainstorm, like the one at the 1976 Montreal Games that managed to extinguish the entire stadium’s gigantic flame.) However, many have tried to do so! And often for political reasons. Others took advantage of the torch’s high media visibility to organize other types of events while leaving the flame itself alone. Here are some notable examples from the last decades.

Rio de Janeiro

As the Olympic Torch Relay entered its home stretch towards Rio de Janeiro for the 2016 Games, a young man threw a bucket of water in an ultimately unsuccessful attempt to shut it down.

Angra dos Reis, Brazil

The man was not the only one who tried to put out the torch ahead of the 2016 Games in Brazil. As the flame passed through Angra dos Reis, a group of striking teachers – enraged at the Rio state government for funding the Olympics without paying for them for two months – successfully seized it. turn it off as part of their protest.

Voronezh, Russia

Two years earlier on the torch relay in Sochi, a gay rights activist tried to wave a rainbow flag as the flame passed through Voronezh, presumably to draw attention to the Russian state’s oppression of LGBTQ + people. He was attacked and detained by the police for doing so.

London

As the Olympic torch passed through London en route to the 2008 Beijing Games, a protester tried in vain to turn it off using a literal fire extinguisher.

Paris

French protesters success where this fire extinguisher fan failed, however, managing to extinguish the flame at least three times in an attempt to draw attention to the Chinese government’s record of human rights violations in occupied Tibet.

Juneau, Alaska

And finally, we have … bong tubes for Jesus? Yeah! Bong knocks for Jesus. In 2002, an Alaskan high school student held up a “BONG HITS 4 JESUS” banner beside the Olympic Torch Relay as he passed through Juneau on his way to Salt Lake City. His 10-day suspension gave way to a First Amendment legal battle, culminating in a 2007 Supreme Court ruling in favor of school administrators.



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Salt lake city

Dentist takes action when car catches fire outside SLC office

SALT LAKE CITY – A Salt Lake City dentist jumped into action when he saw smoke and flames rising from a family’s suburb outside their office.

“An average first day back from a long weekend and I finish a patient, I just do normal fillings,” said Ric Sherman.

When working in a dental office, the only thing you expect to be out of place is in someone’s mouth. But on Tuesday, it was what was going on outside Sherman’s office that caught his attention.

“I was just in the zone and I look up and that was a new thing,” Sherman said.

But even after seeing the smoke coming out of the windows, he didn’t think much about it and instead said to himself, “They’re probably vaping like crazy in there.”

Moments later he was outside and saw that smoke was now coming out of the windows and fire was coming out of the vents. So Sherman did what he had been doing for two years as a dentist and ran inside to grab the right tool: a fire extinguisher.

Luckily, he said the couple from the suburbs had already pulled their baby and toddler out of the car.

Sherman blew the hood, assuming the battery was the cause, but the fire was coming from inside.

“The flames had gone up and melted through the dashboard, then I could see where the source was coming from and I just put the fire extinguisher there,” he said.

Witnesses said the fire started after someone put coins in the cigarette lighter.

“It’s kind of crazy to think… you know, because you leave your kids in there,” Sherman said. “Children will be children.”

The suburb will need a lot more than a refill after today’s visit. But no one was injured, and the interior of the vehicle did the extent of the damage, thanks to a dentist.

“I think it’s every kid’s dream to use a fire extinguisher, so all of my dreams have come true today,” he said.


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Utah economy

Does the media create sexism against women in politics? – News from Saint-Georges

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File photo courtesy of USU Extension, St. George News

ST. GEORGE – Research over the past decades indicates that female politicians continue to be disadvantaged in the way they are covered by the media, and that women are often discouraged from entering politics due to sexist media reporting.

File photo by Unsplash, St. George News

To determine how female political candidates were represented in the Utah media, researchers at the Utah State University Utah Women and Leadership Project assessed media coverage from 1995 to 2020. News articles were collected from The Salt Lake Tribune and Deseret News, Weber’s Standard-Examiner. County and The Daily Herald in Utah County. For analysis, 383 articles were reviewed.

According to Susan Madsen, founding director of the Leadership Project and one of the study’s five authors, the research did not include a benchmarking of media focused on Utah’s men running for office, but each section of the study provides a comparison with other studies. which focused on men.

“Our research may help Utah residents and the media become more aware of gendered language that could negatively impact female applicants, as most people still view ‘leadership’ as a male trait or activity.” , she said.

The study’s research was divided into 12 areas, in order of frequency of mention: candidate background, viability, general tone, mention of gender, leadership traits, male versus female issues, family life, male versus female traits. , physical appearance, personality traits, sexist comments and level of government. Highlights of the research follow.

File photo by Unsplash, St. George News

More than men, women benefited from coverage focused on their background, family life and personality. The media tended to emphasize the lack of viability of the candidates, focusing more on “horse racing” or the predictive aspects of the results of their campaigns.

One politician said: “When a woman is in a leadership position, we expect her to be tough. However, if she is too harsh, she looks “witchy.” But it cannot be too soft, because then it is labeled as “not strong enough for the job.” This is consistent with research indicating that the perceived characteristics of women conflict with the demands of political leadership.

Published research suggests that male candidates are much less likely than women to be referenced by their gender, as men are accepted as the norm in politics, while women are viewed as historical figures at best – or at worst. as abnormal. Repeatedly emphasizing gender underscores the perceived scarcity of female politicians in Utah.

“Compassion issues” are called female issues which focus on people-related topics such as poverty, education, health care, child care, environment, social issues (including LGBTQ) and issues related to women’s experiences (e.g. abortion, violence against women / domestic violence, gender quotas).

Conversely, men’s issues focus on “hard issues”, such as foreign policy, foreign affairs, natural resources, armed forces / military, budget and finance, taxes and the economy. In addition, the media more frequently reported the candidates’ personal information, including marital and parental coverage. In contrast, male applicants are more likely to be described based on their occupation, experience or achievement.

File photo by Unsplash, St. George News

When a candidate got emotional, the Utah media called him out, often in a way that suggested women need to bottle their emotions and bury themselves in their jobs to be tough enough. One candidate was described as “disastrously tearful” and “involuntary”.

Physical appearance was identified in 52 articles, with women’s clothing, age and race being mentioned most frequently. There were also references to her shoes, hair, makeup, height, weight, fitness, beauty or physical attractiveness, and appearance of tired, stressed, or energized. Focusing on a candidate’s personal style and attributes, but not providing comparable ratings for men, diminishes the way women are viewed, ignoring their substance and leadership abilities.

Media coverage has shown subtle forms of sexist language, including things like ambitious, fiery, or compassionate, which only reinforce gender stereotypes. Women tend to be seen as ice queens, grandmothers, mothers or “steel in a velvet glove”. Such comments reduce a candidate’s credibility, respectability and sympathy.

Sheryl Allen, former Davis County state lawmaker, said women have a different perspective and if we are to have good government we need a diversity of opinions and expertise.

Madsen said it was in Utah’s best interests to prepare and support more women in political leadership positions and to provide them with more equitable and representative media coverage.

“The research clearly shows that by doing this, we can uplift our residents and strengthen our businesses, communities and the state as a whole,” she said.

Written by JULENE REESE, USU Extension.

The other authors of the study are Rebecca B. West, Lindsey Phillips, Trish Hatch and April Townsend. The full study is available online. You can find more information about the UWLP here.

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.

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Salt lake city government

1,149 weekend COVID-19 cases, 7 deaths, over 13,000 vaccinations reported as Utah hits 70% vaccine target

Jamie Bone, a nurse with the Davis County Department of Health, prepares a syringe of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the Legacy Center Indoor Arena in Farmington on Tuesday, January 12, 2021. Seventy percent of all adults in Utah now have at least a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, Governor Spencer Cox’s office confirmed on Tuesday. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah Department of Health reported the following update on COVID-19 in the state from Saturday to Tuesday:

  • 1,149 new cases
  • 7 deaths
  • 13,878 vaccines administered

The seven-day moving average for positive cases in the state is now 386 per day.

Seventy percent of all adults in Utah now have at least a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, Governor Spencer Cox’s office has confirmed Tuesday, although the state appears to be using outdated demographics to calculate that vaccination rate.

The governor’s office had set a goal of seeing 70% of Utahns aged 18 and over receive at least their first shot of the vaccine by July 4. The state achieved that target on Tuesday.

“This is really a milestone that deserves to be celebrated,” Cox’s office said on Twitter. “Most of all, we are grateful to all the nurses, doctors, healthcare workers, hospitals and volunteers… who continue to work tirelessly to get us all vaccinated!

Since July 4, the Utah Department of Health reported that 65.2% of adults in Utah had received at least their first dose, Cox’s office said. However, that percentage does not include 114,908 doses of the vaccine that were administered in Utah by federal government agencies such as the Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, and Indian Health Services.

With those additional doses, 1,596,999 Utahns received their first dose of vaccine, Cox’s office said. The governor’s office reported that Utah’s adult population was 2,274,774, so about 70.2% of the adult population now has at least their first dose.

“And that number will only increase,” Cox’s office tweeted.

But that’s an older figure for the population of Utah. The United States Census Bureau most recent data estimates the total population of Utah at approximately 3,271,616, of which approximately 948,769, or 29%, are under the age of 18. Using this data, the percentage of Utah adults who receive at least a first dose is closer to 68.75%.

However, Utah executives, including Cox, said the 70% target was somewhat arbitrary. They will continue to work to vaccinate as many people and exceed the statewide target of 70%, the governor’s office added in a statement on Tuesday. Press release.

“Even if we hit 70%, that doesn’t mean it’s the end of the game,” Cox said at a press conference last week.

Cox’s office thanked those who got vaccinated, as well as the Utah Department of Health and local state health departments for their efforts to get as many people vaccinated as possible.

“They have been striving to take the initiative to set up mass vaccination sites statewide and continue to provide vaccines in their communities,” the press release said.

Cox’s office also thanked the Salt Lake Chamber for launching the “Bring it Home” campaign, which encourages companies to support employees who want to get vaccinated.

Cox’s office added that the pandemic is not over and the state is not out of the woods just yet. Utah has seen a small increase in the number of new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, which is believed to be mainly due to the spread of the delta variant among unvaccinated people.

“We are still very concerned about the recent increase in cases and hospitalizations,” the statement said. “And parts of the state, including many of our rural areas and communities of color, remain under 70% immunized.”

This story will be updated.

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Salt lakes real estate

Tropical storm Elsa heads for Florida

Heavy rains from the storm hit Cuba and the Cayman Islands, which the National Hurricane Center said could cause major mudslides in Cuba.

Two deaths were reported in the Dominican Republic and one in Saint Lucia from the storm, which was a Category 1 hurricane, and Cuba had evacuated 180,000 people on Sunday, the Associated Press reported. However, the worst of the tropical storm missed Havana and it mainly affected rural areas with sustained winds of 50 mph.

The storm is now moving from central and western Cuba to the Florida Keys and the Gulf Coast of Florida on Tuesday and Wednesday.

The National Weather Service (NWS) issued a tropical storm warning to the Ochlockonee River and a warming storm surge from Bonita Beach to the Aucilla River.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis warned in a Tweeter Sunday that “All Floridians should be prepared for the possibility of heavy rains, flooding and potential power outages.”

“Now is the time to restock your supplies and review your hurricane plan,” he added.

NWS meteorologists predicted Elsa would head east over northern Florida, and they indicated that parts of the coast along Georgia and the Carolinas could also face severe conditions. tropical storm Wednesday and Thursday.

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Salt lake city

Why are Utah rents so expensive? The latest Utah housing news

Federal officials recently extended the moratorium on evictions by one month – and they warned it would be the last time.

Housing advocates fear wave of evictions will follow moratorium expiration, and urge tenants in Utah affected by COVID-19 pandemic to get help now before it gets too much late.

But for tenants in Utah, the stress of the rental market is nothing new. For almost every year over the past decade, Utah rental prices have kept going up, up, up.

As Utah tenants continue to be in a hurry, when will they hit breaking point?

After a deep dive into Utah’s scorching real estate market, the Deseret News also delved into what’s going on with the state’s rental market – and why rates are likely to continue to climb.

Learn more about what the data shows, the struggles of Utah tenants, and how housing advocates say they can get help here.

Here are five takeaways from the Deseret News report:

The COVID-19 pandemic may have temporarily slowed rental rates, but now they continue to rise.

In the Salt Lake metropolitan area, the median cost of rent rose from $ 1,384 per month in March 2020, when the pandemic first struck here, to $ 1,451 per month a year later, an increase by 4.8%, according to a new report from Stessa .com. The site ranked the Salt Lake City metropolitan area No. 64 out of 105 U.S. cities where rents have changed the most since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The increases drive down the price of tenants who could otherwise have afforded the same rental just a few years ago.

Almost every year for the past decade, Utah rental prices have climbed 5% to 7% per year along the Wasatch Front, a startling reality that means the average Salt Lake County apartment that cost $ 793 in 2008 now costs about $ 1,145. .

Prices climbed at the highest rate in Utah County, home of the Silicon Slopes tech industry.

From 2000 to 2018, rents in Utah County increased 83%, the largest increase in Wasatch Frontal counties.

Salt Lake County rental rates increased 78%. Davis and Weber counties grew 64% and 59%, according to a June 2019 report from the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute.

In Utah County, an average apartment that cost $ 719 per month in 2008 now costs around $ 1,200.

Rents exceed wages and inflation. Low vacancy rates are stimulating the market.

From 2000 to 2018, the average rent in Salt Lake County was more than double the rate of inflation. For example: In 2000, the average rent for an apartment was $ 647. If rent were to keep pace with inflation, the average rent for an apartment in Salt Lake County would be around $ 850 in 2018, almost $ 300 less than the actual 2018 average, according to the June 2019 report from the political institute.

Meanwhile, vacancy rates remain low. In Salt Lake County, vacancy rates fell nearly 9% in 2009 and are hovering around 4.5%, according to a 2020 CBRE Multifamily Market report. Vacancy rates are similar in Utah and Weber counties, and even lower in Davis County, at around 3.5%.

The impact? Thousands of Utahns are in danger. And the housing gap is widening.

An astonishing 1 in 5 Utah renters are considered “severely overcharged,” meaning they pay more than 50% of their income in rent, according to state and federal data.

Utah has approximately 284,935 renters statewide. Of those, 115,875 – about 40% or 2 in 5 Utah renters – are considered “overcharged” or pay more than 30% of their income in rent. According to the 2020 Utah Affordable Housing Report, about 52,890 Utah residents – about 20% or 1 in 5 Utah renters – are considered “severely” overcharged, which means that they pay more than 50% of their income in rent.

A gap in affordable and available rental units for renters earning less than 50% of the region’s median income in Utah has widened over the past decade, from 41,052 in 2010 to 49,545 in 2018, according to the November 2020 report of the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute. .

The waiting lists for housing are enormous. But there is always help.

In Salt Lake City alone, the wait list for the most common help, Section 8 vouchers, is estimated to be five years or less. Currently, there are over 7,000 Salt Lake families on this list, according to the Salt Lake City Housing Authority.

But while those waiting lists are long and daunting, housing advocates want Utah renters to know there is always help for them. Utah has approximately $ 180 million in government funding for tenants affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Learn more about the resources available to tenants here.


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Utah economy

Farmers’ markets strengthen the local economy, a sense of community; Double Up program helps SNAP beneficiaries – St George News

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Farmers’ Market in St George, Utah, date unspecified | Photo courtesy of Kat Puzey, St George News / Cedar City News

FUNCTIONALITY – Have you shopped at your local farmer’s market? Otherwise, you are missing out! There is nothing like the taste of fresh, locally grown produce.

Juicy tomatoes, perfectly ripe peaches, and fragrant fresh herbs aren’t the only perk of shopping at farmers’ markets. Your family and community reap even more benefits, including:

  • Supporting local producers helps strengthen the local economy by preserving farms and small ranches and creating jobs.
  • Locally produced foods are often of better quality and freshness because they don’t travel long distances before reaching your table.
  • There is a sense of community at your farmers market! Get to know your local producers and their business. Find out what products they offer and what motivates them.
  • Farmers’ markets are just plain fun! Many offer a variety of local produce beyond produce, such as flowers, handmade crafts, herbs, and body care products.

In addition to the benefits listed above, many farmers markets also accept SNAP EBT Advantages. Here is how it works:

Step 1 – Bring your SNAP EBT Horizon card to an information booth at a participating farmers market or farm stand before shopping.

Step 2 – Decide how much money you want to spend. The stand attendant will swipe your card for the requested amount and give you wooden tokens worth $ 1 each which you can use to purchase food from vendors in the market. You can use the tokens immediately or keep them for another day.

Not all markets accept SNAP EBT benefits, so it is important to check with the market before you go. You can find more information and a list of participating markets in by clicking here.

Another great benefit of shopping at farmers markets is the Double Up Food Bucks program. See the flyers below for more information.

Flyer courtesy of USU Extension Create Better Health Blog, St. George News | Click to enlarge
Flyer courtesy of USU Extension Create Better Health Blog, St. George News | Click to enlarge

With all of these fresh produce in your hands, you’ll need some delicious recipes. Click here to download our free Farmers Market cookbook.

One of my favorite recipes from the book is Lemon Roasted Asparagus. The full recipe can be found on this extension USU Create Better Health blog post.

Written by CANDI MERRITT, Certified Nutrition Education Ambassador.

This article was originally published on April 28, 2021 on the USU extension Create a blog for better health.

Copyright © CreateBetterHealth.org, all rights reserved.

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Salt lake city government

Here is the latest Idaho news from the Associated Press at 1:40 a.m. MDT.

PORTLAND, Oregon (AP) – The governor of Oregon has said a heat wave in the Pacific Northwest has killed at least 95 people in that state alone. Democratic Governor Kate Brown told CBS’s “Face the Nation” on Sunday that government officials had warned people of the heat, scattered water to vulnerable people and set up cooling stations. Even so, Brown calls the death toll “absolutely unacceptable.” Hundreds of people are believed to have died from the heat over the past week in the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. Record temperatures included 116 degrees in Portland and 108 in Seattle. Warm weather is heading east, with temperatures well above 100 predicted Sunday for parts of Idaho and Montana.

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – Wildlife officials say a rare animal spotted in a Utah neighborhood is likely on the move looking for a new place to live. The Salt Lake Tribune reports that a home doorbell camera captured the wolverine on video Thursday in West Layton about 15 miles west of Salt Lake City. Utah Wildlife Division officials believe it is the same animal seen on nearby Antelope Island in early May. Wolverines have only been seen six times in Utah. The last time before this year was in 2016. Wolverines look like a combination of skunk and bear and can reach 40 pounds.

KETCHUM, Idaho (AP) – The Nature Conservancy has closed its Silver Creek reserve in central Idaho to fishing due to low water levels and extreme heat. The Idaho Mountain Express reports that the group announced the closure Thursday night. The reserve is one of the most popular trout fishing destinations in the region. The Nature Conservancy says the water temperature recently hit 73 degrees. Warm water means less dissolved oxygen for the fish. The group says closing the reserve to fishing will reduce stress on fish when they experience prolonged stressful conditions. There is no estimate of when fishing might be re-authorized.

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) – Observers say the housing boom in metro Spokane, Wash., Is a problem of numbers. Far too many people are moving in, far too few homes are being built and prices have skyrocketed to unprecedented levels. In May, the Wall Street Journal / realtor.com Emerging Housing Markets Index ranked Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, which is part of that combined metropolitan statistical area, as having the fastest rising home prices in the country. Spokane County came in at No.5. The median price of homes in Spokane County in May was $ 375,000, up 29% from the median of $ 289,900 in May 2020.


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Salt lakes real estate

Tulare Co. crews fight multiple fires over the weekend of July 4

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Florida building collapse death toll rises to 22

More bodies were found in the rubble of a condominium collapse last week near Miami, Florida, as the search for survivors continues. collapsed in the town of Surfside. About two dozen people have been confirmed dead so far, including a 7-year-old girl, and more than 120 are still missing. Miami-Dade Mayor Danielle Levine Cava announced on Friday that she had authorized the demolition of the rest. of the building – for security reasons, the search and rescues were suspended the day before. “This afternoon, I signed an emergency order authorizing the demolition of the building in the interest of public health and safety, as soon as engineers approved the next steps in the demolition process. All residents Nearby Crestview Towers were also ordered to evacuate on Friday after engineers discovered serious concrete and electrical problems.The efforts of Hurricane Elsa could hit South Florida within days. Investigators have yet to determine what caused the 40-year-old condo complex to collapse in one of the deadliest building collapses in U.S. history.


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