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January 2022

Salt lake city

Despite struggles on beam, Red Rocks roll to win Arizona State

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4 Sports) — The top beam team in the nation didn’t look like it Friday night at the Huntsman Center.

But Utah’s gymnastics team is so deep and so talented that they had more than enough to pull off another win, posting season-high scores on bars and floor.

The No. 2-ranked Red Rocks easily beat No. 13 Arizona State at the Huntsman Center, 197,400 to 196,100.

Maile O’Keefe clocked 9.90 on beam and floor. Jillian Hoffman (floor) and Cristal Isa (beam) tied for the highest score in all events at 9.975.

“The ultimate conclusion tonight is that we have to run all four events,” said head coach Tom Farden. “Coming into the warm-ups I saw the vibe from the start and as coaches we need to help them prepare a bit more and be more intentional from the start. I know when they’re on and it’s was last weekend. I know when they have some quirks and it was this weekend.

Utah started the night with a solid vault production, led by Alexia Burch and Lucy Stanhope, who went on to claim a share of the event title. Utah combined for a 49.275 on vault to lead Arizona State, which posted a 49.225 on bars, in the first event.

The Utes appeared to have some momentum in the bar rotation after posting a season-high 49.425 as a team. Amelie Morgan set the tone early on posting a season high of 9.875. In her first barre routine of the season, Burch battled her way to a career-high 9.90 to keep the start going. Sage Thompson followed with a 9.85 before McCallum collected a season-high 9.925 that would earn him the first uneven bars title of his career.

Working with a slim 98.700-98.400 lead over the Sun Devils, Utah opened the beam with a 9.775 from Morgan but struggled to find any kind of consistency throughout the next three gymnasts. After a fall from Grace McCallum and a pair of scores in the 9.6 range, Isa had a huge rebound routine and got the crowd on their feet as she rolled in a career-high 9.975. The routine seemed like the momentum-changer the Red Rocks needed as O’Keefe stepped in next and worked his way to a 9.95 to wrap up an otherwise sub-par rotation for Utah .

Utah held a .250 lead going into the final rotation after 49.025 on beam. Continuing the momentum, Hoffman led the team on floor with a career-high 9.975 in his first-floor routine of the year. Hoffman’s routine, which became the first win of his career, sparked the rest of the roster as the Utes finished with four floor scores of 9.90 or better, combining for a 49.675.

Stanhope posted a 9.875 in second place, while Rucker hit a 9.925. With the game seemingly under control after Arizona State had their own problems on the beam, O’Keefe and Sydney Soloski closed the night in style with a pair of 9.95s.

Utah will be back in action next Saturday, Jan. 29, to host Stanford.

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Utah economy

Creating a Healthy Work Culture Requires Empathy and Vulnerability, Says Utah Executive Coach

(ABC4) – In case you haven’t heard, the Great Resignation is a real thing in America and can have reverberating effects in the modern workplace.

The latest data from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics from November 2021 shows that of the 6.3 terminations this month, 4.5 million were voluntary employee decisions.

They stopped, and they continue to stop now more than ever.

According to Dean Baker, who co-founded the Center for Economic Policy and Research at the University of Utah, one of the main reasons for the mass exodus of employees is the confidence that they will find better jobs elsewhere.

“The unemployment rate has come down much faster than most people expected,” he says, referring to the rebound in the US economy after the pandemic hit. So that means people have a choice.

Rich Baron, workplace expert and executive coach at the Kaysville office of Intelligent Leadership Executive Coaching (ILEC), thinks this could be a defining time for American workers. Not only can they now feel the freedom to leave for a better paying job, but they can also choose the kind of culture that will make them stay.

The latter, he says, is much more important.

“Everyone is paying higher salaries,” Baron tells ABC4.com. Now, the top salary is relatively easy to find. What’s not easy to find is a company that truly has a culture of inclusion and a culture of engagement, where everyone in the organization is set up to succeed.

One of his observations, particularly regarding a younger workforce, is that those with strong leadership and empathy skills will have the opportunity to move up quickly in an organization. For a generation of tech-savvy, wide-eyed people who may be at the start of their careers, learning how to be an effective leader will be in high demand.

“What they’re looking for are the soft skills: accountability, leadership, creativity, problem-solving skills. And when we talk about those skills, those are actually the hardest skills to find,” says Baron. “But those are the skills that people want to develop. They want to develop these skills in order to not only advance themselves, but also help the organization. »

The old days of a dictatorial leadership attitude are dead and gone, says Baron. The idea of ​​a leader who rules his kingdom of work with an iron fist, repressing with a hard and rigid approach is neither realistic nor effective these days. What really matters now, not only for employees, but also for employers, is to be flexible, supportive and understanding.

It’s a lesson that Apple founder Steve Jobs learned towards the end of his life, mindful of his personal legacy and the legacy he would leave for his company. One of the key takeaways that ILEC founder John Mattone left Jobs with was the power of vulnerability.

This can be a difficult thing for many to master, Baron says.

“You have to step out of your own comfort zone and be able to be vulnerable to learn not only what your strengths and weaknesses are, but also how to retrieve that information from the people around you,” he says. “And I’m not talking about being so vulnerable that you lose your confidence – to be vulnerable is to be open to change.”

This, along with changing the mindset from a sense of entitlement to duty, can be essential to creating a culture where people would want to work in the modern era.

To borrow a phrase from one of Apple’s best-known marketing campaigns under Jobs, you have to think differently, Baron says.

“When you talk about thinking differently and thinking big, Steve’s philosophy was to get out of your comfort zone and disrupt yourself, change yourself and not be in that comfort zone, which is really a killer. jobs and it’s a career killer.”

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Salt lake city government

Why Salt Lake City’s mayor says she’s ready to give herself an A for 2021

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall reviews her annual report card, a public accountability document examining the goals she has set in 2021, Thursday outside the mayor’s office in the Salt Lake City County Building. (Carter Williams, KSL.com)

Estimated reading time: 6-7 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Erin Mendenhall’s second year as mayor of Salt Lake City may not have been as intense as her first year in office, 2020, but she found there were many moments that made 2021 feel like an extension of that.

This is especially true given that 2021 ended with an increase in COVID-19 cases in the city and across the state due to the omicron variant. The year also presented new challenges, such as staff shortages and increased drought.

Despite all of this, Mendenhall believes the city has been able to not just survive, but thrive amid these challenges in 2021. So, as she revealed an update on the goals she set for 2021 last January, she’s ready to give herself a high mark on her Salt Lake City 2021 review.

“I think this is the first time I’d give us an A,” she said Thursday outside her office in the Salt Lake City-County Building.

The report offers an assessment of the progress of the projects and goals outlined by Mendenhall in his 2021 State of the City address.

There were 141 defined goals across all aspects of city government, including housing, crime, infrastructure, and the environment. About two-thirds of these goals are marked as completed, while most of the remaining goals are marked as “in progress.” Only about 16 were marked as incomplete.

Mendenhall said, of course, there are items the city may not have liked, but she argues that dozens of items on her list were things the city had never done before.

“It’s remarkable what we’ve done,” she said. “I’m incredibly proud of the employees of Salt Lake City Corporation for having the vision to put this plan together with me in the first place, but really for pulling it off as well as they did.”

So what was she most proud of?

  • Citywide crime is down 5.4% from 2020 and 1.3% from the five-year average. Robberies are down 18% from 2020 and 25% from the five-year average, according to Salt Lake City police data. However, it should be noted that these statistics show that the total number of violent crimes has increased by 4.8% compared to 2020 and by 13.8% compared to the five-year average, due to the increase in aggravated assault and criminal homicide, which the mayor had sought to reduce.
  • The city invested in 300 affordable housing units in 2021, the most in the city’s history.
  • It has made “great strides” in connecting residents of West Salt Lake City by partnering with the Utah Transit Authority to launch a new microtransit program for residents of those areas. Mendenhall said she hopes to expand it to other parts of the city in the future.
  • The city has supported small businesses by providing access to a $4 million community grant pool. It has also provided grants and loans to 38 companies close to construction projects, such as the 300 West project.
  • The city’s Tech Lake City and BioHive initiatives continued with partnerships with the life sciences industry.
  • City officials have completed a Foothills Trail Master Plan. However, plans to build more trails were put on hold in September due to growing erosion concerns. The mayor said Thursday that an independent review of the project was underway and provided no update on that pause.
  • The city updated its overall sustainability policy and its redevelopment agency launched a new policy to only fund projects that meet certain sustainability goals.
  • City officials planted another 1,000 trees on the west side of town.
  • The city has increased its municipal index from the Commission on Human Rights, becoming the first city in Utah to reach 100. The score is based on “the laws, policies and municipal services that are inclusive of the LGBTQ people who live there and work on it,” according to the Human Rights Campaign. Salt Lake City was rated at 75 in 2020.

The report card shows the mayor struggled the most with certain sustainability and homelessness goals.

For example, four of his eight reuse goals were marked as incomplete. The city did not continue its wood reuse program in 2021 after 13 tons of wood was provided to artists and community organizations after the 2020 windstorm toppled more than a thousand trees in the city. city.

The city also hasn’t completed plans to prioritize the use of compost from the city landfill, strengthen its waste recycling ordinances, or explore ways to “promote the voluntary reuse of materials to help low-income homeowners to improve their housing and reduce the cost of home ownership”. .”

Mendenhall outlined a plan to support a homeless winter shelter supported by other cities, the county and the state. That didn’t happen last year, and the city opened an emergency homeless shelter in a former motel last week. The city also fell short of the goal of creating a representative homeless council, as the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness already has a similar group and the bulletin says the city “will support these efforts instead of duplicate them”.

The mayor has marked his role in a small home project for the homeless in Utah. Mendenhall said Thursday the project is now in the hands of the city council; she hopes that the housing development will take place as soon as possible.


I couldn’t think of being in office at any other time in my life that would be better. This is an incredible moment in our city.

–Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall


The full bulletin of all 2021 goals and their current status can be found on the city’s website. It essentially wraps up the first half of Mendenhall’s term as mayor of Utah’s largest city.

She describes the first half as “resilient” as the city absorbed the punches thrown by natural disasters – a major earthquake, destructive storm and major drought – and a seemingly endless pandemic during her tenure, and continued.

“We keep picking ourselves up and we’re stronger than two years ago,” Mendenhall said. “I mean that as a community too. Our character has been exposed – it was already there. Crises don’t create character, they can expose it – and what I’ve seen of our people is remarkable.

“They’re so strong, creative, community-driven and they’re innovating and inventing all the time. … It’s incredibly inspiring,” she continued. “I couldn’t think of being in office at any other time in my life that would be better. It’s an incredible time in our city.”

This year marks the start of the second half of his current term as mayor. She is expected to provide her 2022 goals next week during her annual State of the City address scheduled for Tuesday.

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Salt lake city

A storm is brewing. How much snow will Utah get?

Most of the snow will be in the mountains, but the storm should help clear the air.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Poor air quality clouds the Salt Lake Valley on Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022.

The big news of a storm that will continue through Friday morning in Utah is not what it will bring, but what it will take away.

According to the national weather service, the winter storm will drop maybe a few inches of snow – maybe more in some areas. But the great news is that it should stir up the air and eliminate the inversion and at least some of the smog plaguing the valleys of northern Utah.

A trace of 2 inches of snow is forecast for the northern Utah valleys and 3 to 7 inches in the mountain passes.

The storm is not expected to make the air crystal clear at lower elevations, but it is expected to improve air quality. According to the Utah Air Quality Division, Salt Lake, Cache, Davis, Tooele, Utah and Weber/Box Elder counties are expected to move to yellow/moderate air on Friday.

In Salt Lake City, the National Weather Service predicts a 70 percent chance of snow Friday, mostly before 8 a.m., with 1 to 3 inches of accumulation possible. Daytime temperatures will be in the low to mid 30s, with nighttime lows in the 20s.

Once the storm leaves Utah, there won’t be another in the forecast until the middle of next week. Expect mostly sunny skies, daytime highs in the low to mid 30s and overnight lows in the low 20s – and reversals should occur.

Southern Utah is in even more of a weather rut. The Thursday-Friday storm will not reach St. George, where the forecast is for sunny skies with highs in the mid-50s and overnight lows in the 30s through Wednesday.

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Utah economy

Michigan business leaders say state lags in economic growth

Michigan leaders must set aside political differences to create a cohesive economic development strategy because the state is expected to fall further behind the others in economic growth, according to Business Leaders for Michigan.

The State Affairs Roundtable on Thursday shared its annual benchmarking, which placed Michigan 29th in economic growth of the 50 states after some revamped measures that now include more measures ranging from education level to perception of the business climate through poverty.

The ranking is an improvement from the Great Recession, but that ranking could worsen in coming years if the organization’s projections are true. The gap between Michigan’s economy and the nation’s, when pegged to 2008 levels, has widened 22% during the pandemic since 2019. The difference could increase another 73% by 2030. , leaving the Great Lakes state even further behind.

“There needs to be certainty and consistency in our approach to economic development,” Roundtable CEO Jeff Donofrio told the Detroit News. “Often, not just in economic development, but particularly in economic development, our strategy seems to pivot every time an office holder changes hands, so a new governor comes in or a new legislature comes in.

“Sometimes we put things in place, and there’s a big ribbon cutting or a press release or a sensational event, and then a few years later we pull the funding for it.”

The goal is to be in the top 10 states. This group currently includes Utah, Washington, Colorado, Texas, Massachusetts, Virginia, California, Oregon, Florida and Arizona. All show strong results in terms of economic growth, education and talent.

The forecast comes at a critical time, especially for the state’s auto industry which is undergoing a historic transformation toward electric vehicles with billions of dollars in investment and thousands of jobs at stake. Michigan is underserved. strong for battery factories with just two of the 12 announced in North America and six more with locations on hold, according to the roundtable. The state has about a quarter of internal combustion engine jobs in the United States, and electric vehicles have fewer parts.

By 2025, 43% of Michigan’s 14 assembly plants, or six plants in total, will produce electric vehicles, compared to 37% nationally, according to the analysis. Nearly 170,000 of the 290,000 automotive jobs are potentially affected by the passage of the ICEs, including 46,110 directly affected in 310 companies.

General Motors Co. is looking to manufacture batteries on its Lansing Delta Township plant property, and LG Energy Solution plans to invest in its battery plant in Holland. Meanwhile, Ford Motor Co. last year announced an $11.4 billion investment to manufacture electric vehicles and batteries in Tennessee and Kentucky, sparking a public spat with the governor. Gretchen Whitmer. But the State of Tennessee worked for 20 years to prepare the huge site chosen by Ford for investment.

“Let’s look at Tennessee,” Donofrio said, noting that the state has fallen from 34th to 16th place in the benchmark analysis over the past five years. “They’ve been persistent, but they’ve also had single-party control of the governor and legislature, which makes it a little easier, doesn’t it? They’re not constantly fighting each other every two-year cycle.

“We need to put aside our political differences and do more of what we saw in December,” Donofrio said, referring to the state’s bipartisan effort to spend $1.5 billion on economic development.

The “Michigan talent crunch,” according to the roundtable, also contributes to the potential economic loss. Michigan is aging and could lose nearly 120,000 working-age people between 2020 and 2030. The state has also lost a higher percentage of labor force participation than the country amid the pandemic — nearly erasing the gains it had made since the Great Recession.

“We’re 41st in the country when it comes to labor force participation,” Donofrio said. “Our growth rate is 44th, so that means we’re going to struggle to maintain our position, not just grow.”

Innovation has also been a headwind for Michigan in terms of the number of entrepreneurs and startups here and their survival rate.

More positive was educational attainment, whose growth kept pace with the top 10 states. Michigan’s ranking for the percentage of residents with a college degree or certification is expected to rise from 35th to 20th place over the next year; state programs like Reconnect or Going Pro are meant to get the one million residents who don’t have a degree to get one for free at community college or update worker skills and certifications.

K-12 test scores, however, fell 8% year-over-year, and that’s likely with inflated results because not all districts were required to take the exams during the year. pandemic-hit 2020-21 school year, according to Business Leaders for Michigan.

Wolverine State has the opportunity to invest to improve long-term results, Donofrio said. The top 10 states spend about $2,000 more per student than Michigan. With COVID-19 relief funds available, Michigan has an opportunity to use this money to consolidate administrative services and duplicate school departments, install air conditioning in buildings to offer after-school and summer programs, and train teachers. .

“If we come together, if we do more things like we did in December around economic development, that we did around setting up places to reconnect and the Going Pro program, if we double those things, if we persist with a strategy to help us become a top 10 state, those investments that the legislature can make in the coming months,” Donofrio said, “will help put us on that path that will help us leapfrog other states and really accelerate our growth.

[email protected]

Twitter: @BreanaCNoble

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Salt lake city government

January 13 Feedback and Beyond | Letters | Salt Lake City

Click to enlarge

Bar owners in crisis
We are Utah business owners in crisis. We are Utahns, we are voters and we need your help. Over the past few years, we have invested our time, money and entrepreneurial spirit in the dream of opening our own businesses, businesses that provide jobs and services to our local community.

And yet, we risk failing before we can even open our doors due to outdated and unfair state laws that prevent us from obtaining the basic licenses we need to open. As you well know, Utah arbitrarily limits the number of bar licenses available for distribution.

As the state experiences unprecedented growth, there are now more budding bar operators than available bar licenses. At the current rate of licensing, most of us won’t be able to open for at least a year, even though the vast majority of our operations are set to open within the next six months, or sooner. Instead of focusing our attention on the tireless work of opening a new business, we are stuck in limbo, unable to open our doors and unsure if or when we will be able to do so.

It’s time for you to take a deep look at the benefits the state of Utah and its people derive from the artificial restriction of liquor licensing. The Guardians will list “social interest” as the main justification for restricting bar licenses, but there is no evidence that the existing law discourages overall alcohol consumption.

More importantly, the current law is inconsistent with our state’s self-proclaimed, pro-business, pro-small government principles. Consider negative economic effects downstream. Not only will fewer hospitality businesses find financial support – reducing available jobs, consumer spending, and household incomes – but any business or institute considering an investment in Utah will think twice before coming here, as long as the state proactively interferes in free. – development of the culture and entertainment market.

Even with these important considerations in mind, none of this speaks to the human and emotional toll. We encourage all elected officials to attend a [Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control] meet and witness firsthand as Utah contractors are forced to make their case and the commission finds itself in the unenviable position of choosing who will succeed and who will fail. The meetings are trying and frustrating for everyone involved, including the DABC Commission, which has strongly and publicly called on the Legislative Assembly to address the issue by increasing the number of bar licenses available for distribution.

We implore you to view our position with compassion, to put yourselves in our shoes as business owners who have risked everything to pursue our dream, only to have obscure laws put our careers and families at risk down the line. ‘arrival.

As current and potential business owners in Utah, we call on the Legislature to heed the call of the people of our state and the DABC itself and immediately introduce and pass legislation that increases the bar licenses available and paves the way for local businesses to open now and in the future.

JESSE WILKERSON, JEFF POLYCHRONIS, PETER COLE, GREG SCHIRF, KATY WILLIS, MICHAEL ECCLESTON, TIM RYAN, GEORGE CARDON-BYSTRY, CHARLIE CARDON, JEFF CARDON, JEFF BERNARD, SCOTT EVANS, JASON LECATES, ALEXANDRA ORTIZ, JAMEEL GASKINS, JAMES SOARES, KATIE MCKEON, BRITT JURSIK, NICK MARUCCI, LESLIE CORBETT, BUZZ WILLEY, MAXWELL CHRISTEN, GARRETT CLEMENTS, MIKE ASKERLUND

Do you want to talk about a feature of our pages or a local issue? Write to [email protected] or post your thoughts on our social media. We want to hear from you!

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Salt lake city

Utah adds more than 39,000 new COVID-19 cases and 28 deaths

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – The Utah Department of Health is reporting 39,882 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday, Jan. 18, and 28 new deaths since Friday.

Case

With 39,882 new cases of COVID-19 reported, the total number of cases in Utah reached 790,216.

Of today’s new cases, 8,490 are school-aged children. The UDOH reports 2,556 cases in children aged 5 to 10, 1,875 cases in children aged 11 to 13, and 4,059 cases in children aged 14 to 17.

Vaccines

A total of 4,723,232 doses of vaccine have been administered in Utah.

This is an increase of 27,470 doses since Friday.

Vaccinated vs. unvaccinated risk ratio

Over the past 28 days, unvaccinated people are 13.3 times more likely to die from COVID-19, 6.1 times more likely to be hospitalized due to COVID-19, and 2.3 times more risks of testing positive for COVID-19 than vaccinated people.

As of February 1, 2021, unvaccinated people have a 6.8 times greater risk of dying from COVID-19, a 4.9 times greater risk of being hospitalized due to COVID-19, and a 1.6 times higher of testing positive for COVID-19 than vaccinated people.

Laboratory tests

Utah Department of Health lab reports show 4,611,947 people have been tested. This is an increase of 78,112 since Friday.

The UDOH reports a total of 8,484,276 total tests, an increase of 151,176 tests since Friday.

Tendencies

The 7-day rolling average for positive tests is 10,652 per day.

The 7-day rolling average of “people over people” positivity percentage is 41.3%. The 7-day moving average of the percentage of positivity of “tests on tests” is 29%.

Hospitalizations

There are 681 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19. The total number of hospitalizations since the start of the epidemic is 29,496.

Death

There are 3,979 total deaths, 28 more than Friday.

  1. Male, over 85, resident of Salt Lake County, not hospitalized at time of death
  2. Male, 25-44, Salt Lake County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  3. Male, 45-64, Utah County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  4. Male, 45-64, Salt Lake County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  5. Male, 45-64, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  6. Female, age 85+, resident of Davis County, hospitalized at time of death
  7. Female, 45-64, resident of Weber County, hospitalized at time of death
  8. Male, 65-84, Utah County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  9. Male, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  10. Male, 65-84, resident of Salt Lake County, not hospitalized at time of death
  11. Male, 65-84, resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  12. Male, over 85, resident of Washington County, hospitalized at time of death
  13. Female, 65-84, resident of Weber County, resident of a long-term care facility
  14. Male, 85+, Cache County resident, not hospitalized at time of death
  15. Male, over 85, resident of Sevier County. not hospitalized at time of death
  16. Female, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  17. Female, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  18. Male, 45-64, Davis County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  19. Female, age 85+, resident of Washington County, hospitalized at time of death
  20. Male, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  21. Female, 65-84, resident of Uintah County, hospitalized at time of death
  22. Male, 65-84, Washington County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  23. Male, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County, not hospitalized at time of death
  24. Male, 65-84, Utah County resident, hospitalized at time of death
  25. Male, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County. hospitalized at time of death
  26. Male, between 45 and 64 years old. Resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death
  27. Male, 65-84, Utah County resident, not hospitalized at time of death
  28. Female, 65-84, resident of Salt Lake County, hospitalized at time of death

Today vs Wednesday

Today Friday
Total Utahns Testing Positive 790 216 750,334
Total number of people tested 4,611,947 4,533,835
Utah COVID-19 Deaths 3,979 3,951
Vaccines administered 4,723,232 4,695,762
Utahns currently hospitalized with COVID-19 681 672
Total hospitalizations 29,496 29,029
Courtesy of UDOH
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Salt lakes real estate

Data shows Massachusetts down from Omicron surge

Governor Charlie Baker announced good news about our current pandemic at a conference on Tuesday. Baker, citing the noticeable drop in COVID-19 levels in daily sewage, said the Bay State is “very far behind” the omicron-fueled surge in cases of COVID-19.

Baker had this to say at the press conference regarding the recently collected wastewater reading data:

Is it probably somewhere between 65-75% of what it was at the top a few weeks ago. It’s the exact same trajectory people have seen with Omicron in the UK, South Africa and other parts of the US.

Governor Baker describes the trajectory of omicron surges as “straight up then straight down.” Baker says that while many aspects of the pandemic are highly unpredictable, he is confident wastewater data will continue to improve.

New Years Day through the first two days of January was when COVID levels in sewage were at their peak, according to readings from the Deer Island treatment plant where sewage is tested three times per week.

The sewage test detects the coronavirus in people who have symptoms of COVID-19 and in people who do not have symptoms. According to the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, levels of COVID-19 have dropped 40% in the past week in and around Boston.

You can actually watch the press conference for more on the Mass.gov website here.

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Utah economy

LeBron James Stat Sheet with 25 PTS, 7 REB and 7 AST vs. Jazz 💪


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ESPN released this video article, titled “LeBron James stuffs stat sheet with 25 PTS, 7 REB & 7 AST vs. Jazz 💪” – their description is below.

LeBron James had 25 PTS, 7 REB and 7 AST for the Los Angeles Lakers in their win over the Utah Jazz.

ESPN YouTube channel

Do you have a comment ? Leave your thoughts in the comments section, below. Please note that comments are moderated before publication.

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In this story: LeBron James

LeBron Raymone James Sr. is an American professional basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He is widely regarded as one of the greatest basketball players in NBA history.

James’ teams have played in eight consecutive NBA Finals (2011-2018) and ten finals in total between the Miami Heat, Cleveland Cavaliers and Lakers. His accomplishments include three NBA championships, four NBA Most Valuable Player (MVP) awards, three Finals MVP awards, and two Olympic gold medals.

James holds the all-time record for playoff points, is third in all-time points and eighth in all-time assists. James was selected to the All-NBA First Team a record thirteen times, made the All-Defensive First Team five times, and played in sixteen All-Star Games, during which he was selected MVP All -Star.

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  • In this story: Utah

    Utah is a state in the western United States.

    The territory of modern Utah has been inhabited by various indigenous groups for thousands of years, including the ancient Puebloans, Navajo, and Ute. The Spaniards were the first Europeans to arrive in the mid-16th century, although the region’s harsh geography and climate made it a peripheral part of New Spain and later Mexico.

    Disputes between the dominant Mormon community and the federal government delayed Utah’s admission as a state; it was only after polygamy was banned that she was admitted as the 45th, in 1896.

    Just over half of all Utahns are Mormons, the vast majority of whom are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), with world headquarters in Salt Lake City. Utah is the only state where the majority of the population belongs to a single church. The LDS Church greatly influences Utahn’s culture, politics, and daily life, although since the 1990s the state has become more religiously and secularly diverse.

    The state has a very diverse economy, with major sectors such as transportation, education, information technology and research, government services and mining and a major tourist destination for outdoor recreation air.

    A 2012 national Gallup survey found Utah to be the overall “best state to live in the future” based on 13 forward-looking measures, including various measures of economic outlook, lifestyle, and health.

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  • Categories sport Keywords ESPN, Jazz, LeBron James, Los Angeles, Los Angeles Lakers, Utah, Utah Jazz
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    Salt lake city government

    Governor Cox, Utah Legislators Form Diversity and Inclusion Task Force for K-12 Education

    Rep. Sandra Hollins, D-Salt Lake City, is one of the lawmakers who helped launch a diversity and inclusion program at K-12 schools in Utah. (Shafkat Anowar, Deseret News)

    Estimated reading time: 2-3 minutes

    SALT LAKE CITY — Utah leaders announced Monday the creation of a new task force that will focus on diversity and inclusion in the classroom. The announcement took place at the southwest corner of the Utah State Capitol, near the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. plaque.

    “There is strength in our diversity,” Governor Spencer Cox said in a statement on the bipartisan task force. “I look forward to working with this group to find ways to make every child in every school feel valued and respected.”

    Several elected officials will create a task force to embed a diversity program in K-12 schools across the state, according to a press release from the Utah House of Representatives. The Utah Diversity and Inclusion Commission will be chaired by House Majority Leader Rep. Mike Schultz, Rep. Sandra Hollins, Sen. Kirk Cullimore and Sen. Luz Escamilla. The task force will include not only legislators, but also educators and community leaders.

    “In an effort to create a Utah we can all be proud of, we are embarking on a path to embed a diversity and inclusion curriculum into our K-12 education system,” Schultz said in a statement. “As a bipartisan group, we will take a balanced approach and work together to better understand and find ways to create a better future for our children and grandchildren.”

    The group will work closely with the Utah State Board of Education to develop an appropriate curriculum for children, according to the release.

    “I look forward to working with my colleagues to develop possible solutions to ensure that all of our young people feel safe and welcome in our schools,” Hollins said in the statement.

    Cullimore and Hollins worked on the legislation to make the task force a reality. The group will be formed during the 2022 legislative session in Utah.

    “As education continues to be a key equalizer for our state and our country, the opportunity to help shape a comprehensive and inclusive curriculum – encompassing the full history and diversity of our state – is essential,” said Escamilla said in the statement. “The opportunity to present a variety of perspectives, working towards this goal, makes this an exciting time.”

    The band’s announcement comes on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a celebration of the civil rights icon’s life and legacy. Many events in the state have commemorated King’s life, including marches in Ogden and Salt Lake City, as well as events hosted by local NAACP chapters.

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