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June 2021

Salt lake city

5 local options for your Seltzer summer – SLUG Magazine



As the summer heats up and our evenings lengthen, we seek a refreshing comfort that will refresh us as we navigate a post-pandemic world. Many have made connections with seltzer such as White Claw and Press during their rise in popularity over the past two years, but there is also a healthy pool of locally made seltzer to choose from Рlocal breweries. Epic, Nuances, Uinta, Squatters and Grid city can provide fodder for your scorching seltzer summer. With flavors such as Cherry Lime, Pineapple & Mint, Raspberry, Peach and a fruity Ros̩, your sparkling summer companions are plentiful.


Photo: @ slc-bites

Epic Brewing Company
Pakkā Cherry Lime

In the refreshing world of hard seltzer, Epic‘s Pakkā the offerings are particularly crisp and fresh. The flavors here – our choice was Cherry Lime – are found on the reserved end, more a subtle increase in carbonated sparkle than an explosive intestinal punch. Straight out of the fridge, the lime flavor dominated the first sip. As the seltzer water quickly approached room temperature, as is often the case during a Utah summer, especially when drinking outdoors, the citrus bite mellowed and the richer cherry flavor came to the fore for a pleasantly sweet finish. Epic‘s Pakkā Selts are a safe bet if you really, really want to convince yourself that you are * not * drinking alcohol while you tidy up a dozen bakers by the pool. –AL

pakkāhard.com

Bubble Works Rose by Grid City Beer Works
Photo: @ slc-bites

Grid City Beer Works
Bubble Works Rosé Hard Seltzer

Grid City Beer WorksThe Bubble Works collection is home to a biting troupe of four hard seltts, including the Aperitif, Cucumber Lime, Hoppy Hard and Rosé. While super hot at 8.2% blood alcohol content, this rosé seltzer is the perfect sipping experience to cool off in the sun. Pouring this portion was electric, as the light carbonation projected sparkling bubbles from the top of my mug above the ruby ​​red body of the rosé. The first sip introduces a refreshing, traditional taste of Rosé with a crisp landing on my tongue. Not as sweet as initially expected, the juices of dried raspberry, freeze-dried tangy cherry, prickly pear, and muscat canelli showed up – in that order – as the drink settled down to a warmer temperature. Be warned: at this particular ABV, this little number might be a little TOO easy to drink. Everything will be fine, won’t it? –BV

gridcitybeerworks.com

Livli Pineapple Mint Seltzer, Shades Brewing
Photo: @ slc-bites

Stirring nuances
Livli Pineapple & Mint

Among the local seltzers we sampled, Nuances‘The Livli brand has one of the biggest personalities – a hard seltzer for connoisseurs of flavor. Following Nuances‘penchant for brewing experimentation – their favorite sour Pina Colada, their “Slurry” beer concoctions – the fruit and herbal blend of pineapple and seltzer mint strives to be unique at first. Interestingly enough, the individual notes of pineapple and mint didn’t really speak up during my tasting. Instead, the combination of the two resulted in a creamy fruit flavor not unlike that of classic summer Creamsicles. While the rich flavors and textures of this seltzer make it an unlikely candidate for multiple-can consumption, the Livli’s sturdy body offers a valid choice if your desires incline to sit back and ‘cure one for the flavor’. –AL
shadesbrewing.beer

Grandeur Peak Peach Sparkling Water, Squatters Brewing Co.
Photo: @ slc-bites

Squatters Brewing Co.
Grandeur Peak Peach Sparkling Water

Call me Princess Peach, cause this Grandeur Peak Sparkling peach water made me feel like royalty saved from the grip of danger! If anything could deconstruct a peach and rebuild it into a light, watered version of itself, it’s squatters’ Peak of Grandeur. The fuzzy sensation that greets your mouth from the first sip comfortably rolls out the red carpet for the star of the show, the nicely rounded peach flavor. Crunchy, fruity and almost creamy, this low carbon and very refreshing sparkling drink offers a lighter option than Wild basin‘s Cucumber Peach, without the consequent bloating and lingering malt liquor taste of seltzer water. Arriving at a safe 4.5% ABV, you can easily push a few off before you need to be put in a
turn for a little princess break. –BV

squatters.com

Raspberry Westwater, Uinta Brewing
Photo: @ slc-bites

Uinta Brewery
Westwater Raspberry

Uinta Brewery‘s Westwater Seltzer range does not achieve the same eye-catching novelty as other local brands; instead, the brewery strives to perfect the basics and offers the tried and true trio of lime, mango and raspberry. That said, our raspberry flavor taste test found that simplicity doesn’t equate to blandness. Of the group, Westwater Raspberry has some of the most naturalistic tasting notes, eschewing candy-like artificiality and leaning into the true taste of a fruity drink. While some traditional seltzers lean so crispy they border on tonic and some come across more as high falutin concoctions, Westwater falls in that golden mean – far from bland, but even further from to be an exercise at a sip of experimental perfection. She’s the resident cutie who doesn’t bite but can still give you a great time. –AL

uintabrewing.com


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Utah economy

Beehive Archive — Pleasure Cruising: The Galloway-Stone Expedition

In September 1909, Julius Stone, an Ohio financier, hired Utah adventurer Nathaniel Galloway to take him on a boat trip on the Green and Colorado rivers. It was a time when navigating the rugged and isolated canyons of western rivers was an arduous necessity for scientists and geographers. But Stone and Galloway’s river voyage was the first for the sheer pleasure of boating, and signaled an emerging interest in the idea of ​​discovering remote landscapes just for the fun of it.

Inspired by John Wesley Powell’s travels on these same rivers, Stone was passionate about the wild outdoors. Galloway was a prospector and trapper from Vernal, Utah, known for his experience on the Yampa and Green rivers. Galloway guided the journey and Stone funded it, including building boats built to Galloway’s new design. These flat-bottomed boats were facing forward, so the rower had better control of the vessel and could see – and maneuver through – potential obstacles. Previous boat designs had rowers rowing the backs downstream, resulting in frequent flips.

Galloway, Stone, and a small group of men set off on four boats from Green River, Wyoming. Although the trip was made for fun, it was not without hardships. The men were relatively inexperienced and had to carry their boats and cargo around unmanageable rapids. Only Galloway sailed efficiently through the rough waters, rowing in the current rather than trying to overpower it. Yet the men marveled at their awe-inspiring surroundings and devoted themselves to enjoying the beauty and magnificence of the river. Crossing canyons, catching fish, and exploring distant landscapes left a lasting impression on the group.

The Galloway-Stone expedition ended five weeks later in Needles, California. Pleasure travel foreshadowed the popularity that river racing would enjoy in the 20th century and the impact it would have on the Utah economy. Tourists paid to appreciate the natural beauty of rivers. By the late 1920s, shopping tours were organized from Vernal – and Galloway’s boat design was the preferred choice of river guides until the 1950s.

The Beehive Archive is a project of Utah Humanities, produced in partnership with Utah Public Radio and KCPW Radio with funding from the Lawrence T. and Janet T. Dee Foundation. Find sources and past episodes on Utah Stories from the Beehive Archives.

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Salt lake city government

Owens slams Olympic athlete for protesting flag


Good Wednesday morning Utah! Thanks for reading “The Rundown”.

I want to hear from you! Let me know how to make this newsletter more useful. Email me or find me on Twitter @SchottHappens.

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Owens criticizes Olympic athlete for turning away from American flag

Representative Burgess Owens tore hammer thrower Gwen Berry, who turned away from the American flag during the national anthem during the track and field trials in the United States over the weekend, accusing her of trying to return “His small community of other happy leftists” while disrespecting America.

“She’s going to be a footnote,” Owens said during an appearance on Newsmax. “The only reason to go to the Olympics is to wear red, white and blue and represent your country.”

“If you are ashamed of America, don’t represent America on the international stage,” Owens added.

Berry says playing the national anthem was a “setup.” She claims organizers told her they would play “The Star-Spangled Banner” before she stepped onto the podium with the other qualifiers. Berry turned away from the flag and draped a t-shirt that read “Activist Athlete” over his head as the anthem played.

“The anthem does not speak for me. It never was. Berry told the AP.

Berry, who competed in the 2016 Olympics in Brazil, was sanctioned by the U.S. Olympic Committee after throwing her fist on the podium after winning the hammer throw at the 2019 Pan Am Games. The committee has since apologized to Berry.

Here’s what you need to know for Wednesday

Local News

  • Utah’s coffers are overflowing as state tax revenues exceed forecasts by billions of dollars. This usually means that officials will look to cut taxes, but that might not happen. [Tribune]

  • Utah Representatives Burgess Owens and John Curtis voted against a bill to remove Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol, while Representatives Blake Moore and Chris Stewart voted in favor of the measure. The bill was adopted by 285-120 votes. [WSJ]

  • The Dixie State University Board of Trustees has decided not to change the school’s name to Utah Polytechnic State University. Instead, they recommended Utah Tech University. [Tribune]

  • Second Gentleman Doug Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, will travel to southern Utah this week. [Tribune]

  • Governor Spencer Cox has appointed Marlo M. Oaks as the next state treasurer, replacing David Damschen, who resigned earlier this year. [Tribune]

  • Heavy rains cause flash floods in southern Utah. [Tribune]

National News

  • The Supreme Court rejected a request to lift the national moratorium on evictions due to the pandemic on a restricted vote. [WSJ]

  • Gasoline prices hit a 7-year high due to shortages ahead of the July 4th weekend. [ABC News]

  • The New York mayoral race was plunged into chaos when election officials mistakenly included test results in the latest vote count update. [Politico]

  • Arizona Representative Paul Gosar denied attending a fundraising event with a white nationalist group despite an online invitation promoting their presence. [WaPo]

  • South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem sends 50 National Guard soldiers to the US border with Mexico. A private donation pays for the deployment of a GOP megadonator. [AP]

  • The record-breaking heat wave in the Pacific Northwest sent hundreds of people to hospital. The roads are also deformed in the intense heat. [BuzzFeed]

  • Iranian-backed militias in Syria fired rockets at US troops. US forces responded by firing artillery at the rocket firing positions. [WSJ]

  • Dr Anthony Fauci warns that the COVID-19 Delta variant will create “two Americas” as the gap between vaccinated and unvaccinated areas widens. [CNN]

  • The US real estate market continues to be hot. The average price of homes in major metropolitan areas has increased almost 15% in the past year. [WSJ]

  • Walmart is launching a cheaper version of insulin that will cost around $ 73 per vial. [CNBC]

  • Fox News host Tucker Carlson claimed the National Security Agency was spying on him. The agency basically called Carlson a liar. [Twitter]

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has berated senior officials in that country for failing to prevent a COVID-19 outbreak. [AP]

  • Video of the day: 87-year-old Senator Chuck Grassley pulled off 22 push-ups in a contest against much younger Senator Tom Cotton. [Twitter]

Wednesday Morning Utah News Roundup

Utah

  • A blood shortage could force Utah hospitals to delay procedures. [Tribune]

  • The “unofficial” LGBTQ pride march at BYU draws hundreds of people. [Tribune]

  • Utah is named the most independent state before July 4. [FOX13]

  • What will a gondola look like through Little Cottonwood Canyon? [KSL]

  • Investigators are examining the similarities between several apartment fires. [ABC4]

  • The Summit County Sheriff’s newest patrol sergeant is the first woman on duty. [Park Record]

COVID-19[feminine

  • Près de 1,4 million d’Utahns sont entièrement vaccinés contre le COVID-19. [Tribune]

  • COVID-19 is jeopardizing progress in children’s well-being, according to the KIDS Count report. [DNews]

  • UTA is extending its free rate for COVID-19 vaccinations by 3 months. [Standard Examiner]

Local government

Environment

Education

  • New SLC Schools Superintendent says students need someone like him. [KUTV]

  • Parents of children with disabilities struggle to find inclusive classrooms. [KUTV]

On opinion pages

  • Rachel Rueckert: Accept the bans. Fireworks kill you. [Tribune]

  • I found an apartment, but it certainly wasn’t easy, says the newly arrived Salt Lake Tribune reporter. [Tribune]

🎂 You say it’s your birthday? !!

Happy Birthday to Former State Representative Carl Wimmer and Former State Representative Sheryl Allen.

Do you have a birthday that you would like us to recognize in this space? Send us an e-mail.

– Tribune reporter Connor Sanders contributed to this story.



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Salt lake city

Salt Lake carpet company owner charged with rape, human trafficking


The Matheson Courthouse in Salt Lake City. A Salt Lake businessman who owns two carpet companies was charged Monday with seven felonies accusing him of sexually assaulting a 16-year-old woman and girl after meeting them on a Sugar Daddy dating site. (Spenser Heaps, Deseret News)

SALT LAKE CITY – A longtime Salt Lake businessman faces criminal charges accusing him of sexually assaulting two people, including a teenage girl, whom he met on a Sugar Daddy website.

Raffi J. Daghlian, 77, until recently continued to be active on the website and there could potentially be other victims, investigators said while uploading documents to the 3rd District Court.

Daghlian was charged Monday by the Utah attorney general‘s office with rape, human trafficking and aggravated exploitation of child prostitution, all first degree felonies. He was also charged with three counts of forced sexual abuse, a second degree felony and trafficking in material injurious to a minor, a third degree felony.

Daghlian is the owner of Daghlian Rugs on Main and Daghlian Oriental Rugs and has also been involved in the restaurant industry in Salt Lake City.

He is accused of sexually abusing two people, a woman and a girl who was 16 at the time. Daghlian met the two victims on the Seeking Arrangements dating site, the attorney general’s office confirmed. The website promotes itself as a place “where beautiful, successful people nurture mutually beneficial relationships.”

“The purpose of the dating site was to match men who were willing to pay women money or spend money on women in exchange for dating,” the indictment documents say.

In July 2020, a 16-year-old girl told police she registered on the website and claimed she was 18. She began speaking with Daghlian and the two arranged to have a date “with the understanding that the accused would pay (her) a sum of money to go to dinner with him”, according to the charges.

At dinner, Daghlian made sexual advances to the girl, who responded by telling her “that she was not there to have sex, but rather to get money to pay her rent.” for having dinner with (Daghlian) ”, according to the charges.

After dinner, Daghlian took the girl to a carpet store he owned at 2364 S. Main. At the store, he forced her to undress and engage in sexual acts, according to the charges. The teenager said Daghlian would get “angry” if she didn’t comply, so she did as he asked because she was “afraid of what (Daghlian) would do.”

At the end of the “date,” the girl was paid $ 170, according to the charges.

Another woman told investigators that she met Daghlian on the same dating site in 2013. During their date, Daghlian “repeatedly tried to get (the woman) to drink alcohol. and made several references to sex and sexual relations, “according to the charges.

He took the woman to his carpet store at 1053 E. 2100 South and insisted she have another drink, then raped the woman inside the business, the prosecution documents show.

The woman immediately reported the assault to law enforcement in 2013. A DNA sample of her alleged attacker was taken from her dress. But according to court documents, “Daghlian’s DNA profile was never obtained or compared to the profile on the dress, and the investigation was never presented to a prosecution for screening criminal charges.”

After learning that charges had never been laid and that the case had never even been considered for potential charges in 2013, investigators from the attorney general’s office obtained a DNA sample from Daghlian’s son.

“By comparing the obtained male DNA believed to be (Daghlian’s) son to the DNA on the dress, it is indicated a 99.9999% probability that the DNA on the dress is from a person. having a family relationship with the son (ie the accused), ”investigators wrote in the charges.

An arrest warrant without bail was issued against Daghlian on Monday. Prosecutors say they will obtain a DNA sample from him when he is taken into custody and compare it with the DNA profile taken from the robe.

In each incident, Daghlian “is accused of using a social media dating site designed to match men who were willing to pay women money or spend money on women in return. dating, to lure women into his carpet business for sexual activity. When these women did not consent, he sexually assaulted them to satisfy his sexual desires, “the prosecution documents say.

“Two alleged independent victims reporting very similar sexual assaults suggest that the likelihood of a certain event occurring, such as wrongdoing in error or accusations against an innocent person, is unlikely,” the investigators wrote.

The attorney general’s office also noted in court documents that it was continuing “to investigate other allegations of sexual assault by the accused committed in a similar manner.” Prosecutors say Daghlian continues to be active on the dating site and “over a 90-day period in the fall of 2020, exchanged more than 6,000 messages.”

More stories that might interest you


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Utah economy

Overcoming Michigan regulatory barriers – InsideSources

With the Michigan government lifting all COVID-19 orders on public gatherings and mask requirements, the state economy is poised to recover from public health restrictions imposed by the government. It comes after Governor Gretchen Whitmer unilaterally issued nearly 200 Executive orders suspend, review and modify the main public policies having a direct impact on the behavior of the 10 million citizens and state enterprises. However, this is only the beginning of the regulatory challenge for Michigan small and medium business owners and entrepreneurs planning to fully reopen or start a new business.

Michigan is only one of eight states to report economic status decline above 5 percent in 2020. In addition, the state’s economic output declined 5.4 percent, from $ 471.6 billion in 2019 to $ 446.2 billion in 2020. unemployment rate for May 2021 remained 27% higher than before the February 2020 pandemic, and total employment is down 5.6% over the same period.

Although there is evidence, the Biden administration plans to increase regulation and raising taxes on U.S. businesses, that doesn’t mean state and local governments are powerless to ease potentially negative federal regulatory barriers to entrepreneurship and economic growth at the state level. And for Michigan, a recent study undertaken by Chris Edwards, director of tax policy studies at the Cato Libertarian Institute, offers insight into what state entrepreneurs face when it comes to overcoming state and local government regulatory hurdles when starting a new business.

A useful output of this study is the Entrepreneur Regulatory Barriers Index, an empirical calculation based on 17 variables in four general categories of regulatory restrictions. The variables (converted to a standardized score using a formula) measure the restrictions and costs imposed on new businesses in each state, while the four categories consist of small business views (three variables), professional licenses (two variables), other entry barriers (five variables) and costs created by regulation (seven variables).

So how does Michigan stack up against other states in this index? Unfortunately, not well. Michigan ranks 36th out of 50 states, at the bottom of the third quartile. What stands out are the results of the first category – small business views on regulation. While the Michigan government scores relatively high (on a choice scale of “F to A +”) (“B” among respondents on the “ease of starting a business” variable, the state has a lot of leeway. of progression for two variables, “labor and hiring laws” (“D +”) and “licensing laws” (“C-”). Regarding the category “other barriers to entry”, Michigan requires a “certificate of need” for the healthcare industry and is a liquor license quota and alcohol control state. “Whatever happens in Washington, state and local governments can do a lot to improve the business climate by repealing low-value and harmful regulations,” says Cato’s Edwards.

A starting point for the Michigan state government could be Analyzing state professional licensing laws to assess which professions need public regulation, and if so, what type (or “level”) of public regulation is necessary and effective. Such regulatory review of licensing requirements could reduce the cost of entry (a “barrier to entry”) into a trade, and potentially increase competition and lower the cost of service to the consumer.

A second initiative would be to consider the creation of a “regulatory sandbox” at the state level. In March 2021, Utah became the first state adopt bipartite legislation creating an “all-inclusive” or all-industry regulatory sandbox. A regulatory sandbox is a defined environment where innovative companies can safely experiment under the oversight and guidance of regulatory bodies. By reducing the initial regulatory costs for entering entrepreneurs, these early stage companies have the opportunity to become competitors capable of handling normal compliance costs, after which they “step out” of the regulatory sandbox. After the pandemic, this all-inclusive regulatory sandbox initiative would be a proposal that deserves serious consideration by the Michigan legislature.

In September 2020, Yelp Economic impact report estimated that 60% of businesses closed due to COVID-19 state and local government regulatory requirements would be closed permanently. There is no reason to believe that Michigan has not experienced similar business closure rates as the rest of the country. Now is the time for the Michigan Legislature and Governor Whitmer to come up with innovative bipartisan public policy initiatives to help the small and medium-sized businesses and entrepreneurs in the state who have been the businesses hardest hit by the effects of COVID- 19. Over the longer term, Michigan needs to develop its reputation as a destination state for entrepreneurs, and a more supportive regulatory environment will go a long way in achieving this.

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Salt lake city government

Olympian’s company received $ 10 million in pandemic bailout despite conflicting figures


PARK CITY, Utah – Allison Baver had a dream come true when she won an Olympic medal in short track speed skating.

In October 2019, she set her sights on the film and television industry by incorporating her own production company. When the pandemic arrived months later, Baver was among the business owners who sought help from the Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP.

The Small Business Administration reports that the average PPP loan was $ 206,000. Allison Baver Entertainment received the maximum amount of the program – $ 10 million.

Why Baver Entertainment needed so much is unclear. By email, Baver declined to answer FOX 13 questions and said she was not available until the end of July. Neither Baver nor anyone associated with his company has been charged with any crimes.

On social media, Baver recently posted articles saying she was visiting film festivals and filming locations.

According to data released by the Small Business Administration, which administers the PPP, Baver Entertainment said $ 8.6 million in aid was for payroll. The company said it has 430 employees.

But Baver Entertainment was telling the Utah Department of Workforce Services that it has between one and four employees.

The lower numbers would be more typical of a production company, says Marshall Moore, vice president of operations at Utah Film Studios in Park City. Production companies will hire more workers — actors, crew and support staff — when they shoot.

“You’ll get small budgets under a million dollars and sometimes they’ll work with 30 to 50 people,” Moore said. “And then you can go further. “

“Over a million dollars, 5 million to 10 million dollars, sometimes these teams are about 120 people and that includes the producers, the cameramen, the handles, the electricity,” he added.

What would it take to employ more than 400?

“I mean, for me it would be ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’,” Moore said. “It would be Marvel.”

The P3 is often described as a loan, but the loan can be canceled if the recipient maintains their payroll and only uses the money for other approved expenses, including utilities and rent or mortgage. Candidates were supposed to describe the expenses they had in February 2020.

“The purpose of the Paycheque Protection Program was to reduce unemployment,” said Richard Gordon, professor of law at Case Western Reserve University and director of its financial integrity unit.

He says the PPP did not require banks processing applications to verify that the borrower was telling the truth about their employees and their needs.

With the PPP, “the US government is actually the co-signer,” Gordon said. “So if the borrower doesn’t pay the US government back, that is, we, the taxpayer, will eventually pay off the loan.”

Baver is a native of Pennsylvania who moved to Utah to train. She made three Olympic teams. Baver won a bronze medal with a relay team at the 2010 Games.

For the PPP loan, Baver Entertainment turned to Pennsylvania-based Meridian Bank to process its request. The bank’s CEO declined to discuss the app with FOX 13.

Baver Entertainment has production credit this year for a drama starring actor Elijah Wood titled “No Man of God”. IMDB says Baver Entertainment provided funding.

Gordon, who hasn’t researched Baver Entertainment and only talks in general, said PPP can’t be used as capital to grow. He also doesn’t think funding for a film would be allowed under the PPP unless everyone on set is on the recipient’s payroll in February 2020.

“I think Congress could have made this pretty close to the absence of fraud if it was handled by the Internal Revenue Service,” Gordon said.

The IRS “knows our employees. They know exactly how much they are paid because they know how much they are being withheld. Only three other Utah companies have received $ 10 million, according to a Salt Lake Tribune analysis of PPP data. These three were all in business long before Baver Entertainment.

Some more established production companies have received much less from the PPP. The Jim Henson Co. asked for $ 2.3 million and said it has 110 employees.

New Regency Productions, the film company behind films such as “The Revenant,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” and the latest release of “Little Women,” received $ 1 million and reported 50 employees.

In December, Variety attributed to Baver that his upcoming productions included a horror comedy now called “Monsters.” When FOX 13 reached out to the writer-director named in the article, his rep responded by saying that the project had been put on hold when the pandemic arrived and they had heard nothing more.

Baver also told the news site that his company was working on a horror film called “Dead Princess”. Production was halted by the pandemic and is expected to resume this year.

Baver Entertainment’s listed address is the former Olympian’s townhouse in Taylorsville. According to documents filed with the Salt Lake County Recorder, the Baver Homeowners Association filed a notice in January 2020 that the townhouse was behind on its fees; the HOA was planning to sell the property to settle the debt.

In July 2020, about three months after Baver Entertainment received the $ 10 million, the HOA filed a new notice stating that the debt had been paid. The sale was canceled.


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Salt lake city

Five-alarm apartment fire in Salt Lake City


SALT LAKE CITY – Salt Lake City fire crews responded to a five-alarm fire at the Incline Terrace apartments near 1000 East and 425 South after it was reported just after 2 a.m. Monday morning.

Fire captain Anthony Burton said as soon as the first engines left their posts to intervene they could see flames and smoke from a distance and called for reinforcements. Upon arrival, he said firefighters encountered several people in the six-story building trying to evacuate windows and balconies.

With a fire of this magnitude, Burton said crews would be at the site for some time. “We have several agencies here, a five-alarm structure fire is helping each other,” Burton said.

“Unfortunately, we have a fire to put out, we have water damage and we have an investigation to do, which means it will take some time for these people to be displaced for a while before they can come back to recover. their business and try to reoccupy yourself.

“The most important thing is that no one is left behind, and they are humans in beds, which is why we are here.”

The good news, Burton said, is that everyone has been found and no residents or firefighters have been injured.

The fire department is asking people to avoid the area between 900 and 1300 east on 400 and 500 south as they continue to work throughout the morning.


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Utah economy

Boise teams face off in the final of the Wild West region youth football tournament

BOISE, Idaho – The Regional Far West The youth soccer tournament features seven boys and girls divisions, 190 teams, and on Sunday two teams from Boise made it to the final.

Boise has hosted teams from 14 different states in the west, tournament officials tell us the tournament brings together around 10,000 people and generates between $ 8 million and $ 10 million for the local economy.

“The excitement this generates is just amazing, just go talk to one of the local restaurants or hotels or one of the local businesses that have received a huge hit and after what we have been facing the month last one is fantastic, ”said Craig Warner of Idaho Youth. Football. “The crowd that we just had, I guess some of them don’t even have kids in football, but they just came to support the home team.”

In the U-14 boys’ final, the Boise Boise faced Los Angeles Total Football Academy as the Boise boys attempted to become the first boys’ team to win this tournament.

The Timbers scored first on a nice goal from Grayson Clark, but LA would respond with two goals to take a 2-1 lead before halftime.

In the second half, the Timbers tied, but three consecutive LA goals were too hard to overcome and LA beat Boise 5-3, but the Timbers still had a great run in this tournament.

“For these guys to go through a full regional roster like they’ve done winning every group game, quarterfinal and semi-final against some powerful states is a statement in itself,” coach Eric Simmonsen said. . You haven’t had one last year as a U-13, they haven’t had such an impressive Cup of State.

The tournament also showcased the talent of football here in the Treasure Valley as the U-19/20 Boise Thorns women’s team and Boise Timbers U-18 advanced to the semi-finals before losing.

“Because you have the best teams from 14 states here, you have a lot of college coaches from different divisions and they can watch these teams,” Warner said. “They can be identified right here in their local town without having to travel halfway across the country.”

Even though the loss to the U-14 Boys hurt, coach Simmonsen believes this group has a good chance of becoming the first boys’ team to win the regional championship, but he also feels they might have to face off against it. the LA club. in the years to come.

“They had 5 or 6 more chances to win the very first men’s regional championship, I think that is a testament to them and what they faced during those times,” said Simmonsen. “I think it’s a good message to people on the whole that unusual times create things that are pretty rare and sometimes it’s okay to be rare.”

The Boise Thorns U-16 girls were beaten by Utah’s La Roca 2-1 in the championship game as the team nearly became the second women’s team to win this tournament.

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Salt lakes real estate

The Iconic Manasquan Inlet Favorite in the Market for Lots of Money


It’s not just the picturesque views of the Manasquan River and Manasquan Inlet or the food or dishes that make this establishment so special. It’s the memories. Countless families have walked through after a day at Manasquan Beach or Seawatch Beach and ended the night nearby watching fireworks. Countless employees have spent their summers serving food, drinks, and desserts while bringing smiles to their customers. Countless memories have been created by, dare I say it, millions of locals and tourists over the past 80 years. Now this great business is for sale and the price is just as memorable.

Listen to JB Afternoon on 92.7 WOBM and download our free 92.7 WOBM app.

Credit: Via Carlson’s Corner

Is that Carlson’s Corner that you remember? It is now on sale and the price surprised me. More on that below.

Credit: Via Carlson’s Corner

A look at some of their employees at the time. I don’t have the year the photo above was taken, but it looks to me like the mid 50’s. I’m not a car / truck expert, but it looks like it was. taken during this decade depending on the appearance and style of individual clothing.

Credit: Via Carlson’s Corner

This is another throwback from the Carlson’s Corner website. The value of the company would have been only a fraction of what it is today. According to Weebly, the average price of an ice cream cone in the 1950s was around 10 cents. Today it’s $ 4. Wow.

Credit: Via Carlson’s Corner

Today it looks like this. Located at 432 First Avenue in Manasquan, Carlson’s Corner offers beautiful views, great food and a great pitch:

You are on the Jersey Shore. We know how it is. it’s hot. The weather is nice. The weather is absolutely beautiful, but you are hungry, thirsty and need to cool off. Carlson’s Corner has the cure! Go downstairs and put an end to your hunger with a delicious burger, chicken sandwich or wrap from Original Carlson. Quench your thirst with ice water or a variety of soft drinks. Top it off with the best ice cream ever. Enjoy it all while taking in picturesque views of the Manasquan Inlet and River. Come see us today! – The Carlson’s Corner site

So what is the price charged by Carlson’s Corner?

According to the list, they are asking for $ 1.7 million. While that sounds like a lot, keep all of the factors I described above (location, views, customers, etc.) in mind. Listing agent shares: “The iconic Carlson’s Corner is a thriving seasonal establishment frequented by surfers, fishermen, beachgoers and creek watchers. On Thursday nights in the summer, the queue for ice cream will spread along the sidewalk with people gathering to see weekly fireworks displays on the beaches of Point Pleasant. ” Hope the new owners carry on the tradition and satisfy customers with great service, friendly faces and fantastic food!

WATCH: Here are the 25 Best Places to Live in New Jersey

Stacker has compiled a list of the best places to live in New Jersey using data from Niche. Niche ranks places to live based on a variety of factors including cost of living, schools, healthcare, recreation, and weather. Cities, suburbs and villages have been included. Ads and images are from realtor.com.

On the list, there is a solid mix of offerings ranging from large schools and nightlife to public and pedestrian parks. Some regions have experienced rapid growth thanks to the installation of new businesses in the region, while others offer a glimpse into the history of the region with well-preserved architecture and museums. Read on to see if your hometown makes the list.

WATCH: This is the richest city in every state

Just saying the names of these towns immediately conjures up images of grand mansions, fancy cars, and fancy restaurants. Read on to see which city in your home state received the title of richest place and which place had the highest median income in the country. Who knows, your hometown might even be on this list.


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Salt lake city government

Drought issues in dry western US raise fears of July 4th fireworks


SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – Many Americans seeking normalcy as pandemic restrictions end are anxiously awaiting the traditional July 4 fireworks display. But with a historic drought in the western United States and fears of another devastating wildfire season, authorities are canceling exhibits, banning setting off fireworks, or calling for caution.

Fireworks have already caused a few small wildfires, including one started by a child in northern Utah and another in central California. Last year, a pyrotechnic device designed to celebrate a baby’s gender reveal sparked a fire in California that killed a firefighter during a season of wildfires in the United States that burned the second largest land area in nearly 40 years.

Parts of the American West are experiencing their worst drought conditions in more than a century this year, said Jennifer Balch, director of the Earth Lab at the University of Colorado. People setting off fireworks in the home are of concern due to both the powder magazine conditions conducive to wildfire outbreaks and the threat of injury. Last year, injuries hit their highest level in 15 years after the pandemic canceled large gatherings, federal data showed.

“As a fire specialist, I am preparing for this fire season due to the drought and heat already present,” Balch said. “I think the fireworks right now is a terrible idea.”

Fireworks industry professionals, who have also stressed caution in drought-prone areas, expect strong sales despite a shortage caused by pandemic-related manufacturing downturns and disruptions commercial.

“We think we’re going to have a great year,” said James Fuller, a fireworks safety expert at Alabama-based TNT Fireworks.

While fireworks are an integral part of the nation’s Independence Day celebrations, they light thousands of fires a year, including one that burned down Bobbie Uno’s home in Clearfield, Utah, l ‘last year. She had to jump out of the way before it hit the side of her house.

“In five seconds my house, from the bushes to the roof, was on fire,” Uno said. The fire caused $ 60,000 in damage and forced her family out of their home for weeks.

“I want everyone to be aware of the danger because it’s scary even in a little cul-de-sac,” Uno said.

Several Utah cities are banning people from setting off their own fireworks this year during the record drought, but many Republicans are against a statewide ban. Salt Lake County Councilor Aimee Winder Newton supports the restrictions but thinks this year is a bad time for a blanket ban.

“We’re just coming out of this pandemic where people already felt like the government was restraining them in so many ways,” she said. “When you pronounce bans arbitrarily, we might have a situation where people who weren’t going to light fireworks will voluntarily buy fireworks just to send a message to the government.”

State fireworks laws vary widely across the United States, but local bans on personal fireworks are appearing from Montana to Oregon, which has been hit by massive wildfires the last year.

In Arizona, already ravaged by more than a dozen wildfires, many cities have called off their public fireworks displays. The Yavapai-Apache Nation typically holds an exhibit outside of their casino near Camp Verde in central Arizona.

“This year, with worse conditions than last year, we decided in May that we would not have fireworks,” said James Perry, spokesperson for the tribe’s Cliff Castle Casino Hotel. “Based on the large fires currently burning in and around our community, we are happy with our decision. “

It’s a similar story in Colorado, where dozens of shows have been scuttled, most notably in Steamboat Springs, a ski town where firefighters are already scattered around.

“The grass always catches fire… why are we doing something that causes fire when fire is our biggest problem?” Said Winnie DelliQuadri, the city’s special projects manager.

But in neighboring Wyoming, business is booming in fireworks shops, including sales of banned items elsewhere. Parking lots fill up on weekends and many cars have foreign license plates.

“It’s not just Colorado,” said Ben Laws, director of Pyro City. “We see people from Nebraska, we see people from Montana, we see people from all over come and buy.”

Other cities, including Boise, Idaho and Santa Fe, New Mexico, are working to ban personal fireworks while keeping their exhibits public, where safety precautions are often stricter and firefighters are in alert.

In North Dakota, where more than two-thirds of the state experiences extreme or exceptional drought – the two worst categories – some areas are passing local bans. In South Dakota, where conditions are a little less difficult, the governor is fighting the federal government to organize a fireworks display at Mount Rushmore.

A show that draws tens of thousands of people to Lake Tahoe, Nevada, near the California state border, was initially canceled for the second year in a row, but organizers subsequently decided to host an “experience of smaller and safer fireworks “. Holding fireworks over the water is one of the safest ways to celebrate, said Professor Balch.

The industry is urging people who light their own fireworks to follow local restrictions, choose a flat location a safe distance from homes, have a source of water on hand to extinguish used products and dispose of with care.

Some security officials would prefer people to avoid lighting their own fireworks all together. Michele Steinberg of the National Fire Protection Association pointed to federal data showing 15,600 Americans attended emergency rooms with fireworks-related injuries last year, thousands more than the year before.

“I love watching fireworks, but honestly they’re not safe in the hands of consumers,” she said. “Even a sparkler can reach up to 1,200 degrees, which is actually the heat of a forest fire.”

___

Associated Press editors Felicia Fonseca in Flagstaff, Arizona; Mead Gruver in Cheyenne, Wyoming; Cedar Attanasio in Santa Fe, New Mexico; Scott Sonner in Reno, Nevada; and Associated Press / Report for America, Corps member Patty Nieberg in Denver, contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2021. All rights reserved. This website is not intended for users located in the European Economic Area.


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Salt lake city

Drought brings more snakes to Utah yards – what are you doing?


As a scorching drought sweeps through Utah, more critters are entering public parks and backyards.

This is nothing new to the Utahns, but an increased frequency of snakes in the Salt Lake Valley and elsewhere for the summer means caution and preparation are needed, according to reptile experts.

“We’re getting calls earlier this year than ever,” said Terry Messmer, Utah State University Extension’s wildlife specialist. “All of them occurred in early June, while other instances of snake sightings and bites occurred in late June of previous years. A fatal incident last year was with a person recreating themselves on trails, and these are all sightings in parks. “

Among the calls Messmer received, most of the non-poisonous snakes got lost in the valley. Although most poisonous snakes remain in mountainous areas or in sagebrush, two types of poisonous snakes have been sighted in areas around St. George: the Great Basin rattlesnake and the Mojave sidewinder.

Other snake sightings are typical of the summer season and during times of high drought, according to Wild Aware Utah, an information website in partnership with the USU Extension, the Salt Lake City Hogle Zoo, and the Department of Resources. natural areas of Utah. Snakes don’t need as much water as humans, but still need a little moisture and often seek it out in areas that are actively watered. Farmers may see more of it in irrigation areas, and homeowners should watch out for snakes in wood and garbage piles, which can act as shelters from the sun.

A western rattlesnake used by Haley Bechard of the Utah Rattlesnake Avoidance is pictured in Salt Lake City on Thursday, June 24, 2021. In response to the drought, many snakes search for food and water, and some have recently been spotted in the wetlands of city parks and courtyards. Of the 31 species of snakes found in Utah, seven are poisonous.
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

Food is a major concern for crawling reptiles as well, and they often seek out rodents that scavenge in garbage or compost piles left in backyards.

Drought conditions also exacerbate other problems. As wildfires continue to burn in Utah due to parched grass and high temperatures, snakes are displaced from their natural habitat and may seek refuge elsewhere. According to the Utah Department of Wildlife, all snakes, non-poisonous and poisonous, may move more through backyards and fields this year in search of water.

One of Messmer’s main concerns is that people who have never encountered snakes before now see them crawling on their back porches. When it comes to preparing snakes, knowledge and caution are key to enjoying their presence without encroaching on their space.

Of the 31 snake species found in Utah, seven are poisonous. These are known as pit vipers because of the pit between their nostrils and eyes. Poisonous snakes have shorter nostrils, triangular heads, and slit pupils. Most poisonous snakes are found in sagebrush, juniper pine forests, sand dunes, rocky hills, meadows and mountain forests. Wild Aware Utah advises that if you can’t tell if the snake is poisonous from a distance, leave it alone and treat it as if it were. Even if a snake is not poisonous, it can still react to agitation by biting, which can cause lasting damage to skin and tissue.

Although only about six people die each year from snakebites nationwide, about 6,000 to 8,000 people are bitten by poisonous snakes each year, according to the United States Centers for Disease Control. Many of them are the result of an attempt to illegally handle or kill the snake, according to the Utah Department of Wildlife. Leaving the reptile alone is usually sufficient to avoid a bite and make sure children and pets follow suit.

Hannah Hausman and Ethan Watts walk the Living Room Trail in <a class=Salt Lake City on Thursday, June 24, 2021. In response to the drought, many snakes are searching for food and water, and some have recently been spotted in wetlands from the city. parks and courtyards. Of the 31 snake species found in Utah, seven are poisonous.” data-upload-width=”3000″ src=”https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/jxY9LTbD4hPQzgiMmRBxkJNu-2U=/0x0:3000×1985/1200×0/filters:focal(0x0:3000×1985):no_upscale()/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/22682244/merlin_2875318.jpg”/>

Hannah Hausman and Ethan Watts walk the Living Room Trail in Salt Lake City on Thursday, June 24, 2021. In response to the drought, many snakes are searching for food and water, and some have recently been spotted in wetlands from the city. parks and courtyards. Of the 31 snake species found in Utah, seven are poisonous.
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

When hiking, avoid sticking any part of the body in a crevice, as these are areas that snakes tend to frequent. Always travel with a friend or tell someone where you will be and how long you will stay there, and dress in shoes that cover the entire foot, as most unprovoked snakebites are inflicted on the extremities that end wrong. place at the wrong time.

If you are at a sufficient distance, you can pull out your phone to document the snake using the iNaturalist app. This app allows you to submit photos, find data on the location of species and identify species that are crawling in front of you.

“It’s really beneficial for us to collect data on different sightings,” said Faith Heaton Jolley, public information officer for the Utah Department of Wildlife. “We don’t have an exact number of snakes reported recently, but a database like this helps us get a better idea.”

In the event of a bite from a poisonous animal, the Department of Wildlife Resources, Utah’s Division of Wildlife, and Wild Alert Utah all advocate that the bitten person remain calm, avoid running or lifting the bitten area overhead. heart and contact emergency services. as quickly as possible. Attempting an emergency solution, such as tying a tourniquet to the affected area, can actually do more harm than good.

“Emergency services can give you the best up-to-date advice,” Jolley said. “Some information online is out of date, so call your nearest emergency department and get professional help.”

Haley Bechard of Utah Rattlesnake Avoidance holds a Western Rattlesnake which she uses during training in Salt Lake City on Thursday, June 24, 2021. In response to the drought, many snakes are in search of food and water, and some have recently been spotted in wetlands in city parks and courtyards.  Of the 31 species of snakes found in Utah, seven are poisonous.

Haley Bechard of the Utah Rattlesnake Avoidance holds a Western Diamondback Rattlesnake which she uses during her training in Salt Lake City on Thursday, June 24, 2021. In response to the drought, many snakes are looking for foraging for food and water, and some have recently been spotted in the wetlands of city parks and courtyards. Of the 31 snake species found in Utah, seven are poisonous.
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News


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Utah economy

How low socioeconomic status influences disparities in diabetes care

Various socio-demographic characteristics fuel the disparities observed in pediatric diabetes care. At the 81st American Diabetes Association Virtual Science Session, Ananta Addala, DO, MPH, Pediatric Endocrinologist and Medical Scientist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., Addressed the role of socioeconomic status in these disparities. .

Addala noted that previous research has shown that minority patients often receive poorer quality health care than their peers. The reasons for the differences in care include environmental factors and discrimination. Clinical judgment on the appropriateness of care as well as patient preferences have also been seen as contributing to the difference in the quality of care, but have long been noted as not contributing to the disparities, but Addala believes both do. Along with the management of diabetes, one of the main places where disparities are seen is access to diabetes technologies such as insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors. Diabetes technology has been shown to improve hemoglobin A1c levels, especially in pediatric cases. Children with low family income as well as public or uninsured insurance have higher hemoglobin A1c levels, indicating less access to diabetes technology.

She then discusses the results of a study comparing insulin pump use and continuous glucose monitoring by socioeconomic status in 2 cohorts: 1 in the United States and Germany, at 2 different times, 2010 -2012 and 2016-2018. The German cohort was selected because it represented an economy similar to that of the United States. In both cohorts, the researchers found an increase in the use of insulin pumps between the 2 periods. However, the American cohort showed that significantly fewer patients from the lowest socioeconomic group used pumps than those from the highest economic group, while in the German cohort, negligible differences were noted between socioeconomic groups. economic. Ongoing blood glucose monitoring saw a significant increase in use for both cohorts, but as with insulin pumps, the US cohort showed significant disparities in use by socioeconomic status. In Germany there was very little difference between them. Therefore, hemoglobin A1c levels are significantly higher in the lowest socioeconomic status level in the United States. Children at the lowest socioeconomic level in Germany also had higher hemoglobin A1c levels than their wealthier peers, but the difference was much less significant.

Insurance may be at the root of these disparities, Addala noted. She discussed a recent comment that showed the variability in the requirements for a child in a Medicaid program to get continuous blood sugar monitoring. Some states like Ohio and Wisconsin do not offer specific requirements for the technology. Others, like Utah and New York State, will only cover the technology for patients with type 1 diabetes who also perform self-administered finger-prick blood sugar tests at least 4 times a day. A final factor of disparities is the prejudices that some providers may have towards patients with lower socioeconomic status. A meta-analysis found that providers often had less empathy for patients from lower socioeconomic groups.

Reference

1. Addala A. The state of disparities in the management of pediatric diabetes: the role of socio-economic status. American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions 2021; June 26, 2021; virtual. Accessed June 26, 2021.

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Salt lake city government

PM Newsletter: Asylum Discrimination, Pioneer Park Map and Trauma at Boarding School


Friday evening June 25, 2021

state

US Department of Justice rules on behalf of asylum in discrimination case

The US Department of Justice settled a discrimination claim with a Utah company. Easterseals-Goodwill is based in Montana but has offices throughout the region, including Utah. A woman filed a complaint against the office here, claiming that her proof of work documents were illegally rejected. She said she was asked to provide additional documents to verify her eligibility to work due to her immigration status. She was asking for asylum in the country. Other non-US citizens have been urged to do the same. As part of the settlement, ESGW was ordered to pay approximately $ 6,200 in civil penalties. They also need to review their policies and train their employees on anti-discrimination laws. – Ross Terrell

SCOTUS rules on exemption from the Air Quality Act

More small refineries can apply for exemptions from certain renewable fuels requirements that are part of the Clean Air Act. That’s from a 6-3 U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Friday. The court ruled that a small refinery that had already been granted a hardship exemption can get an extension. This is even if the refinery allowed a previous exemption to expire. The Biden administration argued that in order to get an extension, a refinery had to maintain a continuous exemption since 2011. Refineries in Wyoming, Utah and Oklahoma have argued that siding with the Biden administration would eliminate the exemption for most small refineries in the United States. – Associated press

Northern Utah

Little Cottonwood Canyon Traffic Plan Update

The Utah Department of Transportation has accepted two proposals to reduce traffic in Little Cottonwood Canyon, the often congested road from the Salt Lake Valley to Alta and Snowbird ski resorts. The two finalists increased the bus service while widening the route or a gondola above the canyon. Josh Van Jura of U-DOT said each proposal serves a different purpose: speed or reliability. The bus is the fastest option, while the gondola offers more regular travel times. The decision comes after three years and 124 initial proposals. The public now has 45 days to weigh in on their preferred option. Read the full story. Jon reed

Salt Lake Valley fire chiefs ask people not to use personal fireworks

Salt Lake Valley fire chiefs are asking people not to use personal fireworks this year. They are just the latest group to call for restraint due to Utah’s extreme drought and dry conditions. The governor and other elected officials have done it too. In a video released on Friday, chiefs across the valley said responding to fireworks incidents prevented them from being able to respond to medical emergencies. Last year alone, they were needed for over 650 fireworks-related calls. People are encouraged to view public postings only. If you are caught lighting fireworks illegally, you can be fined up to $ 1,000. You may also be held responsible for the cost of fighting fires and any damage that occurs. – Ross Terrell

Salt Lake City Seeking Pioneer Park Reviews

Salt Lake City is seeking public input on the revitalization of Pioneer Park. The city launched a poll on Friday to gauge what the public expects from the downtown park. He also organizes a field day and a movie night on Saturdays. The park is home to the city’s weekly farmer’s market. It is also traditionally a gathering place for people experiencing homelessness in the city. Earlier this month, a woman was stabbed in the park. Police arrived and shot the man after charging the officers with a knife. The investigation will be open until July 21. – Caroline ballard

Region / Nation

Supporters of worried history of boarding schools can lead to trauma

News of another unmarked mass grave discovered at a residential school has had an emotional impact on residential school survivors and their loved ones in the United States. But mental health care resources for survivors and their loved ones are limited due to severe underfunding of the Indian Federal Health Service. Advocates call on the Home Office to increase funding before asking survivors to share their stories. Crisis counseling services are available to those dealing with the news on the Residential School Survivors’ website and hotline. – Savannah Maher, Mountain West Press Office

Navajo President Jonathan Nez comments on anonymous graves

The US Department of the Interior announced this week that it would investigate the residential schools it ran for Native American children in the 19th and 20th centuries. It follows the discovery of hundreds of anonymous graves at a residential school for Indigenous students in Canada. Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez told KUER he was happy the United States was paying attention to a dark period in its history. “Put these types of stories in the textbooks of every school across the country so people know what indigenous people went through,” Nez said. The US government operated a residential school for native children in Brigham City, Utah, from 1950 to 1984. Children from several tribes, including the Navajo nation, were sent there. Listen to the full interview with Nez here. – Kate Groetzinger, Bluff


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Salt lake city

The University of Utah: Building More Inclusive Systems


June 25, 2021

“These are two important changes as we work to create more inclusive systems at U,” said Clare Lemke, director of the LGBT Resource Center. “It’s now easier for individuals to use whatever name they choose in more academic systems and communications. We hope that many students will choose to update their CIS page with data on gender and sexual identities so that we can better serve everyone. “

Gender and gender identity information

Lemke said giving students a way to share information about their identity will help the university better understand how to recruit, retain and graduate students of diverse identities. The goal is to use this data to improve the resources, programs and policies that support a diverse campus.

Name chosen / preferred

Previously, U employees and students had the option to update their chosen / preferred first names in HR and CIS systems. Now, chosen / preferred names will be automatically updated in multiple systems across campus so students and employees no longer have to ask each department to replace their legal first name in HR systems or the campus directory.

“As we celebrate Pride Month, it is significant that we, as an institution, are making university-wide system changes that more include LGBTQIA + people who live, work and learn here. Making it easier to navigate our institution and making sure we know who the students are is important, ”said Lemke. “At the same time, we know there is still work to be done and we are motivated to continue to make meaningful structural changes with real impacts.”


This press release was produced by the University of Utah. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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Salt lakes real estate

New Jersey girl’s hilarious gas pump failure goes viral on TikTok


You will always remember the first time you had to pump gas outside of New Jersey. And now you will also remember the unfortunate experience of this Jersey Girl.

The other night I was browsing Instagram, and the gem of a page New Jersey Memes shared this User TikTok @nessybabyyy fill its tank for the first time. The results were unfortunate, but hilarious.

Listen to Diana Tyler’s Nights on 92.7 WOBM and download our free 92.7 WOBM app.

As you watch, keep these questions in mind. First, how did she not realize she was using diesel? The pump is clearly distinct from gasoline ones – and it’s so much more expensive! Second, when did she realize she had done something wrong? Was it when she first started pumping or did she notice something was wrong when she tried to turn on her car? And third, did the gas station charge him for the diesel?

@nessybabyyythank god I’m from jersey ♬ original sound – nessybabyyy

If you were also wondering why an entire tow truck had to save it from this situation, JD Power says:

Since diesel fuel is thicker and denser than gasoline, the fuel pump will have a hard time moving the diesel / gasoline mixture through the system. In addition, diesel will not be able to pass easily through the fuel filter. Instead, it will clog the fuel filter. And no matter how much diesel then goes to the engine, the fuel injectors will be clogged, rendering them unusable.

It sounds awful. But don’t worry, @nessybabyyy. I’ve also had my share of embarrassing gas pumping moments. I was in Texas once and spent maybe 10 minutes trying to pump my gasoline until I asked for help from a man next to me (who was from New Jersey! ) was under the fuel pump when you removed the nozzle.

Do you have a mind-boggling horror story? I would like you to tell me about using the chat function on our WOBM 92.7 app!

H / T: New Jersey Memes, Instagram

WATCH: Here are the 25 Best Places to Live in New Jersey

Stacker has compiled a list of the best places to live in New Jersey using data from Niche. Niche ranks places to live based on a variety of factors including cost of living, schools, healthcare, recreation, and weather. Cities, suburbs and villages have been included. Ads and images are from realtor.com.

On the list, there is a robust mix of offerings ranging from large schools and nightlife to public and pedestrian parks. Some regions have experienced rapid growth thanks to the establishment of new businesses in the region, while others offer a glimpse into the history of the region with well-preserved architecture and museums. Read on to see if your hometown makes the list.

The 100 Best Places to Live on the East Coast



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Utah economy

Report: Nevada’s children among the worst affected by pandemic

A new report reveals that children in Nevada suffered more during the pandemic than those in many other states, and that small child welfare gains made before the pandemic may have been reversed.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation’s 2021 Kids Count report found that many Latin and black families in particular were going through a difficult time even before the COVID-19 closures resulted in so many job losses.

Tara Raines, Director of Kids Count Initiatives for the Alliance for the Defense of Children, said Nevada needs to tackle some big issues.

“The report released after the pandemic showed that we were suffering more than the national average on the four key points,” she said, “and it was health insurance, parents with feelings of hopelessness and despair. depression, housing insecurity and food insecurity. “

Using data from 2019, the report ranks Nevada 41st in the United States for child economic well-being and 46th for education. It found that 60% of fourth graders read below grade level and 74% of eighth graders do not have proficiency in math. But those statistics represent a gradual improvement over the 2010 figures. Nevada’s teenage birth rate and the number of adolescents in school have also improved.

The report also contained good news, finding that the US economy had started to recover in March. Leslie Boissiere, vice president of external affairs for the Casey Foundation, said child poverty is set to drop significantly in July – once the money begins to flow from the expanded child tax credit under the plan. American rescue.

“For families with children under the age of 6, it is $ 300 per month that these families will receive,” she said. “So at a time when families are worried about being able to pay their mortgage, or paying their rent or providing food for their families, this is a significant amount.”

The child tax credit expires in December; President Joe Biden has asked for his five-year extension. The report recommended that Congress make income supports permanent for low-income families.

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Salt lake city government

Can Utah – and its residents – survive the cut in federal COVID-19 unemployment assistance?


Is Utah’s economy and tens of thousands of workers still out of work ready for a change on Saturday that comes with a $ 50 million prize?

Utah Gov. Spencer Cox said his decision to end pandemic-related federal unemployment benefits to some 24,000 Utahns two months ahead of the deadline was the right call amid rising employment from state and robust recovery from the impacts of COVID-19.

But some say they face constant challenges finding work even as the state’s unemployment rate drops to 2.7% and employers advertise 70,000 current job openings. A southern Utah resident recently wrote to the governor describing the hardships he and his wife face as she struggles to find work after losing her job during the pandemic.

“It affects us personally,” said Barry Brumfield of St. George.

The governor gives the reason for the cut

“This is the next natural step in getting the condition and people’s lives back to normal,” Cox said in May when the decision was announced. “I believe in the value of hard work. With the lowest unemployment rate in the country … and many well-paying jobs available today, it makes sense to step away from those added benefits that were never meant to be permanent.

“The market should not be competing with the government for workers. “

He also noted that other “safety net programs” such as assistance with rent, utilities, food and medical bills will still be available.

Stephen Cashon, employment counselor with the Utah Department of Workforce Services, helps Juan Rodriguez apply for a new piece of ID so he can apply for jobs at the department's offices in <a class=Salt Lake City on Tuesday, June 22, 2021.” data-upload-width=”3000″ src=”https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/OhJ–bMQQvUxFVfEX8PQyD_b84M=/0x0:3000×2071/1200×0/filters:focal(0x0:3000×2071):no_upscale()/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/22675676/merlin_2875060.jpg”/>

Stephen Cashon, employment counselor with the Utah Department of Workforce Services, helps Juan Rodriguez apply for a new piece of ID so he can apply for jobs at the department’s offices in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, June 22, 2021.
Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

Cox is one of some two dozen Republican state governors across the United States who have made similar decisions regarding the early end of federal pandemic benefits, saying the added benefit keeps people from wanting to work.

Labor experts say the shortage isn’t just about the $ 300 payment. Some unemployed people have also been reluctant to look for work because of fear of catching the virus. Others have found new occupations rather than returning to their old jobs. And many women, especially working mothers, have had to leave the workforce to care for children.

Following Cox’s announcement, Utah House Minority Leader Brian King, D-Salt Lake City, highlighted these factors while expressing frustration with the governor’s decision to end the benefits. in Utah.

“I mean, it’s the perfect example of a disconnect between people in normal life and people who are struggling to get back on their feet,” King said. “There are many, many people who are worried – afraid – of going back to work. “

What “frustrates me the most,” King said, is that Cox’s decision “reflects this thinking from many across the aisle that people don’t want to work. This is fundamentally wrong.

In early June, the Utah Department of Workforce Services reported that just over 24,700 residents were on some type of unemployment benefit, of which about 12,000 were on traditional benefits plus the federally funded pandemic allowance of $ 300 per week. About 11,000 others were still receiving unemployment insurance benefits under federal extensions also created to mitigate the economic impacts of COVID-19 on American workers. And about 1,200 Utah gig workers – people employed by companies like Uber, Lyft, GrubHub, and others who are classified as contractors who are exempt from typical unemployment benefits – have also received benefits under federal emergency warrants. While federal deadlines for most pandemic-related benefits for the unemployed are due to expire in early September, Cox’s order suspends them 10 weeks ahead of schedule.

And it’s a decision that worries Barry and Stacey Brumfield.

An IT position is available for a job seeker at the Utah Department of Workforce Services in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, June 22, 2021.
Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

The experience of a family

In an interview with Deseret News, Barry Brumfield said he was a longtime Republican who also voted for Cox in the 2020 Utah gubernatorial election, but felt that the governor’s decision to reduce early federal pandemic benefits was a bad call.

“We are very unhappy with this decision,” said Brumfield. “We truly believe in the individual rights and benefits of your own hard labor, but we have come to the point where we feel our hard work has been lost.

“We support the other things that (Cox) does, but that’s our only argument because it affects us personally.”

Brumfield, who is retired, said his wife lost her 13-year job at SkyWest last year as the air travel industry was nearly at a standstill by the pandemic. As Stacey Brumfield continues to look for work, Barry Brumfield said the only offers she had had so far were for minimum wage jobs and at 63 she was unable to start a new job. new career.

In a letter to Cox, Barry Brumfield wrote that his wife’s job search experiences have led her to believe that employers in their area are looking for younger prospects.

“Governor, you may think you are doing what is best for your constituents, but my wife and I are among those who will be greatly affected and hurt by your decision,” Brumfield wrote. “My wife’s job is ‘essential’ so that we can pay the bills and stay out of poverty.

“However, my wife, who worked in the airline industry for 13 years, lost her job due to the pandemic and the drastic decline in airline operations. Now she is unemployed by the state and the federal government, which is vital for us. She is 63 years old and has been looking for a job since the start of the pandemic. His attempts to find a job were unsuccessful due to his age !!! Businesses want someone younger !! said the letter.

The Brumfields aren’t the only Utahns who find themselves both nearing the end of their career and currently looking for a job. As of June 17, the Department of Workforce Services reports 13% of those currently unemployed are 60 years or older.

But the majority – 68% – of those who will be affected by the suspension of federal pandemic benefits are in the “peak working age” category of 25 to 54.

And that’s a statistic that some economists say bodes well for Utah’s overall economy, which continues to outperform the rest of the country.

Utah can absorb lost federal aid

Phil Dean, former director of the state budget and current senior public finance researcher at the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute at the University of Utah, said Utah’s economy is well positioned to absorb the $ 50 million that will be lost in the suspension of federal benefits in the event of a pandemic.

“I just think we’re at a point in the economic recovery where it really makes sense to do it,” Dean said. “Overall, the elimination of the benefits will have a negligible impact on the economy … although some pockets will recover more slowly than others and some households will feel these changes.”

Dean said it’s important to remember that standard UI benefit programs will remain in place and those who fail to find employment will still have access to the standard claims process.

He said that while the programs launched by the federal government to mitigate the worst economic impacts of COVID-19 on individuals and families were the right answer at the time, current circumstances no longer demand the additional benefits.

“The scale of the challenge we had in the midst of the pandemic along with the government’s involvement in restricting the private sector made the initial response entirely appropriate,” Dean said. “And it’s entirely appropriate now to take those enhanced benefits and go back to the traditional programs and system.”

At a virtual Facebook event on June 15, Cox reiterated his belief that his decision to end the pandemic-related benefit and allowance extensions was the right economic call and highlighted efforts to channel additional funds towards worker retraining programs.

Cox said the state has spent $ 16.5 million to help more than 5,700 people get training and find better employment opportunities through the Learn and Work program. He also noted in a press release that the state has committed an additional $ 15 million that will go to Utah training institutions to help those who want to upgrade their skills improve their employment opportunities.

You can find more information on the possibilities for retraining at jobs.utah.gov/jobseeker/career/index.html and uselessah.org/learn-work.


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Salt lakes real estate

Camp under the stars, near the waterfalls at these sites at WI


Every summer my family spends a lot of time in Wisconsin. That being said, I’m always on the lookout for new things to see and do, new adventures to experience when we’re up North. I came across an idea on voyagewisconsin.com it even had me, the total non-camper, wanting to buy a tent and spend a few nights under the stars.

If you’re a camping enthusiast, you might already be familiar with these “waterfall camping” sites in Wisconsin, and I’d love to hear your reviews, but if your idea of ​​camping comes close to “glamping” like me, all of you. these campsites offer options that we will love too.

Where to find Wisconsin waterfalls

Wisconsin is actually home to many different waterfalls, but here are a few campsites that will get you hopping, jumping, and a short hike away from the perfect vacation selfie opportunity.

  • Pattison State Park in Superior, WI – Travel Wisconsin says this park is home to the state’s largest waterfall, Big Manitou Falls, which is just a 5-minute walk from the main (and modern) campground. If you’re up for a longer hike, you can also visit Little Manitou Falls for more spectacular views.
  • Governor Dodge State Park in Dodgeville, WI – Besides beautiful views of the waterfalls, Travel Wisconsin says Governor Dodge is also home to 2 lakes with swimming areas and 40 miles of hiking trails. The park also has 2 different campgrounds where you can stay.
  • Amnicon Falls State Park in South Range, WI – Travel Wisconsin says this park has a “series of delightful waterfalls and rapids along the Amnicon RiverThe park has a “rustic” camping option to stay.
  • Falls Lake in Mercer, WI – Travel Wisconsin says there are three camping options in the park, but “the Quiet Side sites are arguably the best with rustic sites right by the water ”.
  • Marinette County Waterfalls in Marinette, WI – If you want some quality time with a bunch of waterfalls, Travel Wisconsin says this “Waterfall Capital of Wisconsin” has 14, plus several different campgrounds / styles to choose from.
  • Copper Falls State Park in Mellen, WI – Travel Wisconsin says that a 1.5 mile hike from the campsite will take you past 2 beautiful waterfalls.

Looks like a lot of beauty awaits us in Wisconsin this summer!

WATCH: Here are America’s 50 Best Beach Towns

Each beach town has its own set of pros and cons, which got us thinking about what makes a beach town the best to live in. To find out, Stacker took a look at WalletHub data, released on June 17, 2020, which compares US beach towns. Ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. The towns had a population of 10,000 to 150,000, but they had to have at least one local beach listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. From these rankings, we have selected the top 50. Readers who live in California and Florida will not be surprised to learn that many of the cities featured here are in one of these two states.

Read on to see if your favorite beach town has made the cut.

10 Wisconsin Roadside Stops You Must See This Summer


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Salt lake city

Obsession led man to set fire to Salt Lake City office building


SALT LAKE CITY – The man accused of set fire to a Salt Lake City apartment building earlier this month was “obsessed” with a woman who owned a business there.

WATCH: Tense bodycam video shows police shooting Pioneer Park suspect

Alexander Kentish Tuita, 37, has been charged with multiple counts of stalking, as well as aggravated arson for his alleged role in the June 13 fire that destroyed the three-story building at 1104 E Ashton Avenue.

According to the probable cause statement, a woman told the Unified Police Department that Tuita had been a client of her massage business and had “called and texted her inappropriately outside of office hours.” The woman said Tuita even created a fake Instagram profile of her and, when confronted with the owner of the business, admitted to doing it because he was obsessed with her.

Tuita allegedly called the woman and challenged her fiancé to fight. Even after the woman informed the police, Tuita tried to make an appointment online and was refused, according to the police.

READ: Worker used master key to enter woman’s bedroom before assaulting her, police say

Another woman who owns another massage business in the same building already obtained a civil harassment injunction against Tuita in 2018, which remains active until December 10, 2021.

When approached by fire investigators, Tuita “admitted that the fire on Ashton Avenue was his fault and that it started the blaze.” He told authorities he poured a full pot of gas on the building and started a fire with a lighter.

“Then I got back to my car without looking back,” Tuita said.

Investigators say the fire caused about $ 1.75 million in damage to the building itself, with damage to nearly 25 businesses unknown.


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Utah economy

Red state takeover fuels GOP fight against Biden spending plans

Businesses, economists and policymakers are divided over whether the policies of conservative governors on unemployment benefits and Covid-19 restrictions – many of them have chosen not to issue any at all. Stay-at-home orders – are actually helping their savings or so industries in their states simply haven’t fallen as far behind during the pandemic.

Yet the patchy recovery and poor job growth reported in April and May gave Republicans ammunition to repudiate Biden’s costly aid plans. They also stoked Conservative concerns that federal aid, particularly the $ 1.9 trillion American rescue plan which passed without GOP support in March – should have focused more on those most in need.

“Overall, the funds could have been used much better by being more focused,” said Rachel Greszler, economist at the Heritage Foundation. Congress should have tied UI to workers’ incomes or allowed states to use federal aid to distribute their own benefits based on labor market needs “in whatever way they thought best suited them.” , she said.

The seven states that chose not to issue a stay-at-home order last year – Arkansas, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming and Utah – were all led by GOP governors.

Republican-led states were also very early to relax trade restrictions in the event of a pandemic and hide mandates: Missouri, Montana, Iowa, and Alaska were among the first states to reduce their trade needs by January and February. Texas, Arizona, Arkansas, New Hampshire and Wyoming followed in March.

Of those states, Montana, New Hampshire, Arkansas, South Dakota, Utah, Missouri and Nebraska returned to pre-pandemic economic activity levels in April and reported lower unemployment. at the national rate of 5.8% in May.

By comparison, states that still have some restrictions on coronaviruses, including California, Connecticut and Hawaii, had the highest unemployment rates in the country in May and were still producing less in April than before the pandemic.

Washington lawmakers sent direct checks to millions of middle- and low-income Americans and supplemented state unemployment benefits with additional weekly payments and coverage for workers traditionally ineligible for unemployment assistance . They also distributed $ 1,000 billion in government guaranteed repayable loans to small businesses under the Paycheck Protection Program, initially on a first come, first served basis.

Other economists wonder if Congress could have maneuvered as precisely as Greszler suggested to save the economy early on, amid a flood of business closures and tens of millions of layoffs caused by health restrictions. pandemic.

“There aren’t a lot of nuances you can use in politics when trying to get the money out as quickly as possible and adapt to local situations for every worker in the state,” said Daniel Zhao. , senior economist. at Glassdoor. “It is very difficult to bring help to all those who need it at the same time, and in a way that is actually targeted at individual situations.

The uneven nature of the recovery partly reflects the diversity of state economies. States like New York, California, Hawaii and Nevada that rely heavily on tourism, as well as food and accommodation, are among the deepest of the economic hole and have the longest way to go, according to the The Federal Reserve’s April State Coincidence Index, which estimates economic conditions based on local employment and wage data corresponding to state GDP trends.

Hawaii’s economic activity in April was 13% lower than it was in January 2020, according to the index. Activity in Nevada and New York is also still down nearly 10% from before the pandemic. Florida, down just 1%, is doing better.

But states like Utah, Idaho, South Dakota, and Nebraska that rely heavily on food processing and manufacturing – industries deemed critical and required to stay open during the pandemic – are falling back to the forefront. normal much faster.

“What we are seeing is the states that were the most down at the start are still the most down, and it’s basically the states that depend the most on travel,” said Michael Ettlinger, founding principal of the Carsey School. of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. “There’s just more destruction, if you will, in these states, and it’s just going to take longer to come back. “

The advantage that GOP-led states such as Georgia, Mississippi, Arizona and Missouri enjoy in rebounding from the pandemic has fueled Republican attacks on Biden’s policies.

More than two dozen GOP governors have decided to end federally-funded extra unemployment benefits, citing labor shortages they say are triggered by generosity. In Congress, Republican lawmakers use a similar argument against Biden’s plans to spend $ 4 trillion to shore up the nation’s infrastructure and expand social programs.

“Our goal should be to rebuild the economy as quickly as possible, not to subsidize it,” said Sen. Mike Rounds (RS.D.), who cited the extension of unemployment benefits. as a reason to vote against an aid plan put in place by the Democrats in March.

Some economists say it is not clear whether generous unemployment benefits are a factor preventing jobs from being filled.

A June analysis of the United States Chamber of Commerce itself has found that the ratio of available workers to job openings is what it was before the pandemic. Before Covid, “companies struggled to fill openings because available workers lacked the skills companies needed,” wrote senior economist Curtis Dubay. “This problem persists now.”

And an analysis of May from the hiring website Indeed’s chief economist, Jed Kolko, found that job search activity in states ending federal benefits saw a brief temporary jump on the platform shortly after. time after the governors announced they would.

Economists, as well as the Biden administration, also say issues such as lingering hardships for parents at daycare, lingering fear of contracting the virus, and an economy that appears to have gone from zero to 60 in a matter of weeks have likely the strongest effect.

“We have this kind of race to the bottom, state after state, with Republican governors… ending the benefits and, frankly, misleading people,” said Senate Finance Chairman Ron Wyden (D-Ore .). “They tried to make a big deal by saying we were cutting the extra $ 300. This is simply not true. They cut an extra week, they cut the concert workers, if someone has exhausted state benefits.

With about 4 million Americans – disproportionately workers of color and women – faced “virtually zero income … which makes the need for federal reform much more serious,” he said.

“This crazy quilt of state systems that offer different levels of data, unemployment benefits and approaches to reopening highlights to me the need, the urgency for fundamental reform,” Wyden said.

He campaigns for an overhaul of the unemployment system that would unite all states under a single benefit infrastructure and create automatic triggers that tie benefits to economic conditions, among other things.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Wyden proposed last year to extend the unemployment benefits program until a state’s unemployment rate falls below 6%, but Republicans were hesitant to support a long-term extension of unemployment assistance financed by taxpayers.

Had Congress passed the proposal last July, 27 states would currently have unemployment rates low enough to phase out the extra $ 300 in additional benefits under the program.

“Hopefully this will spark a conversation after the pandemic ends on how to improve our safety net,” Zhao said, “not just in terms of expanding it, but also making sure it actually reaches the people it needs and reaches them quickly when help is needed.

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Salt lake city government

Salt Lake City workers could get pay raise


SALT LAKE CITY – Police, firefighters and other employees in the city of Salt Lake City could benefit from a pay rise. Salt Lake City Council has approved a measure that sets aside millions of dollars to negotiate the salaries of hundreds of people.

City officials have three different unions they work with. They include the Salt Lake Police Association, the IAFF of Salt Lake City Firefighters, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME).

In total, these unions have over 1,800 members. Currently, negotiations are still ongoing with two of them.

Meaning. no one wanted to divulge specific details of a potential pay raise for Salt Lake City employees.

However, in a special working session, Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall told city council his police department was dealing with 70 pending vacancies, and that a police shortage in the ‘Utah makes it very difficult to find new ones.

District 1 representative James Rogers told council he should not seek to create new departments within city government while dealing with this issue.

He said, “We have a board moving forward with a new department when we shouldn’t be, in my opinion, when we should be looking first and foremost on public safety.”

In the end, the council decided to take $ 9 million from the balance of the city fund, which is their rainy day fund, and set it aside so that it could eventually be used during their negotiations.

District 3 Representative Chris Wharton said the police department had a much higher turnover rate in 2020, and that wasn’t just due to violent protests and calls for police department funding. .

“Salt Lake City was lagging behind in agent compensation compared to other cities in Utah and other comparable cities in the region,” Wharton said. “Salt Lake City has asked officers to do more than any other police department in the state.”

Wharton said they still wanted to create a system that had less funding for police services and more funding for other forms of crisis response. However, he said they just weren’t ready for it yet.

“We don’t have a system in place where we just can’t send the police and send something else. We have to build this system as we move forward, ”he confirmed.

The City will finalize its agreements with these unions at a tax truth hearing scheduled for August 17, and the public will be able to comment.


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Salt lake city

Yummy’s Coming to Salt Lake | Food News | Salt lake city


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Yummy’s comes to Salt Lake City
Orem-based Korean BBQ Yummy’s recently opened a second location in West Valley (2946 W. 4700 South, 801-769-6614, yummysutah.com). While in Orem, Yummy’s made a name for itself with its Korean menu and all-you-can-eat meat buffet, featuring a wide range of grilled meats that diners can cook at their own tables. While browsing the Yummy website, we recently discovered all kinds of new plans for the future: They plan to offer subscription meal delivery kits in the near future, and they’ve embraced the keto-friendly nature of cooking. Korean. In addition to this, Yummy’s plans to open new locations in St. George and Eagle Mountain. Long live the Yummy Empire!

Mr. Charlie is growing
The Mr. Charlie’s Chicken Fingers team (554 W. 4500 South, 801-803-9486, mrcharlies.com) recently opened their second location in Draper (592 E. 12300 South). I couldn’t be happier with this news, as it brings Mr. Charlie’s delicious grilled and fried chicken fingers list one step closer to my neighborhood. For those who haven’t yet enjoyed the fried splendor of Mr. Charlie’s chicken fingers, this is a place that only serves chicken fingers, although they also appear on po ‘boys, sandwiches. and wraps. I know fried chicken is a minefield of hot catches right now, but Mr. Charlie’s was making chicken fingers long before this comfort food classic infiltrated social media memedom.

The best Sunday openings
Brunch has always been a polarizing meal, but since it was mostly limited to Sundays, the fabric of food criticism has remained largely intact. Now that chef Tyler Stokes and local restaurateur Michael McHenry, the team behind Ginger Street in Salt Lake, have created a brunch concept only known as Sunday’s Best (10672 S. State Street, 801-441-3331, brunchmehard.com). In addition to brunch classics like monkey bread, homemade cookies and smoked salmon, Sunday’s Best will offer a wide range of meats, vegetables and house cocktails suitable for brunch. If brunch is your thing but you hate to wait until Sunday, this restaurant is for you.

Quote of the week: “Breakfast is a meal, but brunch is a culture.” –Matt Basil


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Utah economy

NM does not have a real strategic plan to make R&D profitable ”Albuquerque Journal

The Albuquerque Journal recently published: “Census Wakeup Call: State’s low growth shows the need for tough conversations and big political improvements.” This column shows where New Mexico’s rank lags behind that of neighboring states. The question is how to solve this problem. New Mexico needs to have a vision for its economic future and a strategy to implement that vision, but where are we now? Let’s take a look at the data comparing Bernalillo County to high tech, Utah County, Utah where Provo is located.

Between 1998 and 2014, Utah County had a median household income that was $ 15,000 higher than that of Bernalillo County. In 2015, Utah County’s median household income was $ 19,000 higher than that of Bernalillo County. By 2019, this difference had grown to $ 23,000. For most states, their largest city leads the economic development of that state.

Cities with high tech and private sector economies eg Austin, Denver, Salt Lake City, Chandler, Provo, etc. In general, high-tech cities have median household incomes of $ 80,000 or more; large cities in the interior of the United States with no private sector, high-tech economy have median household incomes of $ 55,000 to $ 60,000; and rural areas and small towns have median household incomes of $ 40,000 and less.

In 2017, according to a Brookings study, Albuquerque had a per capita investment of $ 259 in academic research and development (R&D) in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), compared to just $ 60 for Provo. More than $ 3,000 per person is spent on R&D in New Mexico – the nation’s fifth largest – while Utah spends $ 1,200. New Mexico is unlikely to prosper from more investment in R&D unless it learns how to get more out of its R&D funds.

Many believe that high-tech jobs like those created in Utah are only available to masters of science and doctorates. STEM graduates. However, the American Association for the Advancement of Science has determined that even though STEM employment supports 69% of U.S. GDP, 60% of STEM professionals hold less than a bachelor’s degree.

………………………………………….. ……………. …………..

The congressional bill, The Endless Frontiers Act, lists key technological areas that the United States must address to be economically and militarily competitive with China: artificial intelligence and machine learning; high performance computing, semiconductors and advanced computer hardware; quantum computing and information systems; advanced robotics, automation and manufacturing; prevention of natural or man-made disasters; advanced communication technology; biotechnology, genomics and synthetic biology; cybersecurity, data storage and management technologies; advanced energy; and materials science, engineering and exploration relevant to other key technologies.

These are the technologies that New Mexico’s defense labs will focus on in the future. At 25% of the state’s GDP, these defense laboratories are our most important economic asset; during their boom, oil and natural gas accounted for 10%.

New Mexico has contracted SRI to lead our state’s strategic planning effort. The state targets the “industries” of outdoor recreation, value-added agriculture, global trade, advanced manufacturing, biosciences, film and television, cybersecurity, aerospace and renewable energies. Four of them are listed in the Endless Frontiers Act. It is imperative that our state does its strategic planning well and does not focus on building industries with low median household income. As the data shows, we went and we did.

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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City Continues Olympic Bid Discussions With LA 2028; IOC President minimizes urgency to organize 2030 Winter Games


Salt Lake City’s increased efforts to host a second Olympic Winter Games include ongoing discussions with organizers of the Los Angeles 2028 Summer Games, Susanne Lyons, president of the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee confirmed on Monday. (USOPC), from its headquarters in Colorado Springs.

Rice-Eccles Stadium and the 2002 Olympic Cauldron in Salt Lake City. SLC 2002 generated an operating surplus of over US $ 50 million.

The talks show the Utah capital is keen to run for the previous Games in 2030, even as organizers say they may have to wait until 2034.

Holding the Games just 18 months apart in the United States could be financially inefficient for both events and the USOPC, as the exclusive sponsorship windows will overlap and there is a risk that some disposable income will be split. Organizers in Los Angeles, who won the Games in 2017, are expected to sign the Salt Lake City 2030 Games and may ask for concessions in return.

Other insiders have suggested that the double blow of the back-to-back Summer and Winter Games could be a marketing boon for sponsors and provide efficiencies that reduce the costs of hosting both events.

“We are very much aware that there are interlocking threads,” Lyons said. GamesBids.com by conference call referring to conversations between the Salt Lake City-Utah Games Committee (SLC-UTAH), the LA 2028 Organizing Committee and the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

Last week, SLC-UTAH took it up a notch by appointing Olympian Catherine Raney Norman as the new bid chair and adding top athletes to the board including Lindsey Vonn, Apolo Ohno and Monte Meier.

SLC-UTAH President Fraser Bullock was frank with The sports examiner when he indicated a clear preference to host in 2030 over 2034. He said that “our sites are well supported by the [2002] endowment, but the endowment is decreasing, and over time it’s going to get smaller and smaller, and can we keep our sites active? It was never intended to last this long, so there are going to be financial hardships to keep everything alive until 2034. Frankly, the numbers don’t add up.

“I think the other thing is – very important – back to the athletes. “34 is a long wait for the Games to come back here, and if we’re going to re-energize the USA team in winter sports, I think ’30 would be a lot stronger for us. “

But Lyons stressed that no decision has been made and that opportunities exist either year “if and when we bring the Winter Games back to the United States.”

Lyons also pointed out that there would be little movement with the bid ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, which is slated to open on July 23.

Earlier this month, IOC President Thomas Bach downplayed the urgency of awarding the next available Winter Games slated for 2030 despite news that Brisbane is set to sign the host city contract to host the Summer Games two years later in 2032, when members meet to vote on plans in Tokyo next month.

Bach said GamesBids.com “We’re in no rush, you know we’re still nine years ahead of these Winter Games, so it’s a work in progress. Let’s see when when [the IOC Future Host Commission] will find something [to report to Executive Board].

He added: “The organization of the Winter Games is somewhat more complex than the organization of the Summer Games because Olympic size swimming pools are available almost everywhere in the world, but there are not so many of mountains where you can organize a descent. Some of them therefore require further study.

The Winter Games are usually awarded seven years in advance, but in 2019 new reforms eliminated the deadlines and now allow the IOC Executive Board to nominate a candidate for election at any time. Interested cities engage in an ongoing dialogue with future IOC Host Commissions until a preferred candidate is recognized. With Salt Lake City, 2030 bidders emerged from Vancouver in Canada, Sapporo in Japan and Pyrenees-Barcelona. Quebec in Canada has also expressed interest and other jurisdictions may be involved, but the IOC has said it will keep the names of interested bidders confidential.

Beijing is expected to host the 2022 Winter Games in February and Milan-Cortina is preparing to host the event in 2026.


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Utah economy

Home improvement could be a first step towards climate justice

Workers stormed Flora Dillard’s home east of Cleveland. There is plastic on everything and no place to sit, but Dillard doesn’t seem to care. “A few days of inconvenience is nothing compared to the results you get,” she says.

It will benefit, and the climate too. Workers patched cracks around the foundation and diverted a vent to reduce the risk of mold growth. They isolate the upstairs bedroom where the drafts are so cold that Dillard used several electric heaters last winter. They also discovered and repaired a gas leak. “I could have exploded,” said Dillard. “Me and my grandchildren and my brother who is here visiting.”

She didn’t pay anything for it. She can’t afford it. But thanks to government and help with utilities, her house should soon be more comfortable, safer and cheaper to heat. It will burn less fuel, thus reducing the amount of greenhouse gases it releases into the air.

The repairs to Dillard’s house are an example of what is sometimes called “climate equity” – efforts to tackle climate change in a way that also attacks the country’s social and racial inequalities. Millions of homes in American cities are in urgent need of rehabilitation. These homes are often concentrated in predominantly African-American neighborhoods, which have suffered from discrimination and redlining. Many contain health threats like mold, lead contamination, and indoor air pollution.

The same homes are often the least energy efficient, requiring more fuel to cool and heat. Residential housing accounts for about one-fifth of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions.

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Under his sweep infrastructure plan, the Biden administration wants to replicate Flora Dillard’s reparations in millions of homes across the country. The Biden plan would allocate $ 200 billion to renovate and build green homes, especially in what the White House calls “underserved communities.” The goal is to improve people’s homes and create jobs while fighting climate change.

The infrastructure plan, part of which the Biden administration included in its 2022 budget proposal, must be approved by Congress, which is uncertain. The Republican version of an infrastructure package does not include green housing initiatives.

“I feel like this is our lowest fruit and also the means to have the greatest impact, especially in disinvested communities, struggling communities,” said Tony reames, former director of the Urban Energy Justice Lab at the University of Michigan. Reames has just taken a new job as a Senior Advisor at the US Department of Energy.

Cleveland offers a case study on the need and opportunity for home renovation. According to Kevin Nowak, executive director of CHN housing partners, who organized the work at Dillard’s home, tens of thousands of homes have similar problems only in Cuyahoga County, which includes Cleveland. Most Cleveland homes are at least 40 years old. Almost a third of local households earn less than the poverty line, and many homeowners lack money for renovations.

Cleveland drafted its first climate action plan in 2013. But in 2018, the city tore it up and started again, this time with a new focus on fairness. City officials met with hundreds of people in Cleveland neighborhoods to hear their concerns, and in the end they were given the top spot on the city’s to-do list to make more homes “affordable,” comfortable, healthy and energy efficient ”.

Cleveland’s population has more than halved since 1950, decimating the tax base. It would take $ 781 million to fix every house in the Cleveland metro area that needs repairs, according to to researchers at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. This is way beyond what the city government can afford. This is about double what the city pays each year to operate its public school system.

Some private funds for renovations have conditions attached. The local gas utility, Dominion Energy, helped pay for Flora Dillard’s new, more efficient gas-fired furnace. Under the Dominion program, funding must go for a new gas furnace, rather than an electric heat pump that could significantly reduce greenhouse gas pollution.

Nowak says he would rather maximize the number of homes his organization can reach, rather than using limited funds on more expensive equipment needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in a smaller number of homes.

The Biden administration’s plan to pump money into home improvement could dramatically change the situation. White House budget documents forecast a significant increase in funding for a program that pays for the weatherization of homes, from about $ 200 million and $ 300 million annually to $ 17 billion over the next five years. The administration also wants to pour $ 40 billion into the renovation of social housing and $ 27 billion into a “clean energy accelerator” that would act as a non-profit bank that can finance energy saving projects. all kinds.

Cecilia Martinez, senior director of environmental justice at the White House’s Council on Environmental Quality, says the administration’s plan must be ambitious as it tackles huge issues and rooted in a history of discrimination . “We have an opportunity now. This is our key opportunity to transform our economy as well as our infrastructure, ”she said.

Funding alone won’t do the job, even if Congress approves it. Renovating homes on such a large scale will require a rapid increase in hiring by private construction companies and new efforts to reach homeowners whose buildings are in need of work.

Reames, who was interviewed before taking on his new post at DOE, says it might require a new approach as well. Current government programs rely on homeowners to take the initiative and seek help. Flora Dillard, in Cleveland, was lucky: her niece told her about the programs, and when Dillard went to town offices to fill out the paperwork, a former classmate was working there and helped her do it right.

Reames would like cities to see housing as critical infrastructure that they assess regularly, rather than waiting for landlords to contact. “I used to work in local government,” Reames says, “and we would plan our waterline replacements, our streets, based on the age of that infrastructure. And the same goes for housing.

Houses in a particular neighborhood were often built around the same time and can have similar problems. He says cities could put entire neighborhoods on a schedule and go door-to-door, checking out what each needs.

Kimberly Foreman, Executive Director of Environmental health watch who has worked in Cleveland neighborhoods for decades, says these efforts require patience. “We always have to ask the community, what do they want? She said, “rather than saying, ‘We have the answer, you should do it.’ “

You can renovate homes and install new equipment, she says, but these upgrades will only work well if the people who live there understand the changes and actually see the value.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.
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Salt lake city government

PM News Brief: Wildfire Preparedness, Utah Transportation Authority Oversight, and Rise in COVID-19


Monday evening June 21, 2021

state

Utah sees increase in COVID-19 cases

Utah is seeing a slight increase in new COVID-19 cases and test positivity rates. This is according to data from the state Department of Health. The weekly average of daily new cases is currently 293. The positivity rate is now 5.5%. Both figures are up from a week ago. Over 60% of eligible Utahns have now received at least one dose of vaccine and just over half are now fully immunized. – Caroline ballard

Utah Transit Authority Ends Federal Government Oversight

The Utah Transit Authority will no longer be overseen by the federal government. In 2017, the transportation authority and the United States Attorney’s Office in Utah agreed to the surveillance. Prior to that, UTA had been investigated for such things as its service operations, the use of federal funds, and grant applications. As a result, an independent law firm took a look at how he was doing his business. In a letter on Monday, the prosecutor’s office said it was satisfied with the results of the surveillance and the UTA’s commitment to “do it right.” – Ross Terrell

Northern Utah

Plane crash in Tooele County kills two, forest fire

A small plane crash in Tooele County killed two people and started a forest fire. The accident happened Thursday evening. A small plane crashed southwest of Salt Lake City, near Rush Valley. The cause of the accident was not immediately clear. The identity of the deceased was not immediately disclosed. According to Utah Fire Info, the Morgan Canyon Fire burned 157 acres over mostly steep and rugged terrain. – Associated press

Responsibly Recreating in Utah Reservoirs

At least four people drowned in Utah tanks last week. Now state and local authorities are urging people to use caution when recreating themselves this summer. Three of those deaths have occurred at Deer Creek Reservoir since June 17. None of them wore life jackets. There was also a big blow to Jordanelle over the weekend. State law requires everyone to have a life jacket handy on the water. Devan Chavez, of the state’s Parks and Recreation Division, said they all appeared to be “unfortunate accidents.” He said it may sound simple, but wearing life jackets saves lives. Read the full story. – Lexi Peery, Saint-Georges

Region / Nation

People overestimate forest fire preparedness

New research from the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder shows how residents of mountain communities can underestimate wildfire risk and overestimate their preparedness. In the town of Bailey, Colorado, 22% of those surveyed rated their property as high risk, while professional wildfire appraisals showed a rate of 61%. – Maggie Mullen, Mountain West Press Office


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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City Intl Airport: New Artwork ‘The Canyon’ Awaiting Prize


The artwork lining the walls of the new Salt Lake City International Airport could win an international award, but it is up to the public to help the artwork achieve that goal.

See “The Canyon” at Salt Lake City International Airport

  • Gordon Huether’s “The Canyon” is one of 100 large-scale community works of art from around the world that have been nominated for a CODA Audience Award – an annual award given to “outstanding works that successfully integrate art. in interior, architectural and public spaces, “according to a press release sent to Deseret News.
  • Working on a budget of $ 5 million, Huether and architectural firm HOK sought to create an indoor canyon at the new airport, which opened in September 2020.
  • As the main artist, Huether brought the shapes and ridges of Utah’s canyons to life along the walls of the airport. “The main goal was to bring the outdoors in and give visitors to the state of Utah a sense of belonging,” according to codaworx.com.
  • “The Canyon” is “the central art installation at Salt Lake City International Airport,” the Deseret News reported. As part of the Salt Lake City airport redevelopment program, “Canyon 2.0” will be installed in a hall whose construction will be completed in 2024, according to codaworx.com.
  • “The Canyon” and “Canyon 2.0” won’t be Huether’s only jobs at the airport, however. The “River Tunnel,” another Utah-inspired piece with sound effects of blue light and water, reported the Deseret News. The planned installation date is 2024.

How to vote for ‘The Canyon’

  • Thirty countries submitted hundreds of commissioned art projects for review this year, accounting for $ 477 million in commission fees, according to the press release. The two projects that receive the most votes online will receive the CODA Audience Award.
  • Voting is open now and will run until June 30. People can vote for their favorite work on codaworx.com. The winners will be announced on August 30.
  • Other works of art in the running include painted windows from a redeveloped All Saints Church in Nuremberg, Germany; the “Animalia” exhibition at the Montclair Art Museum in New Jersey; and a 30 foot aluminum arch beacon that sits at the entrance to the Edmonton Police Center in Canada.
  • Toni Sikes, CEO of CODAworx, said in a statement that the People’s Choice contest can get “pretty hot,” with heavy traffic, even causing the website to crash every now and then.
  • “It’s an exciting race to the finish line, the equivalent of the Tour de France in the art world! Sikes said.


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Utah economy

Crowd solutions are needed for crowded Utah national parks

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah’s national parks saw a decline in visits last year due to the pandemic, but most are on course to break records this year.

FOX 13 spoke with a Texan couple who visited Zion and Bryce Canyon in early June. This was Layne and Misty Hill’s first time at both parks and they said they were shocked at the number of people on the trails with them.

“We’ve wanted to do this trip for a long time and we’ve been looking for it for a long time,” Layne said.

“The only thing I wasn’t prepared for when I got there was the number of people,” Misty added.

READ: Yosemite National Park to require reservations from May 21

They expected to spend “time alone” in nature with their children, only to find thousands of other people in Zion National Park as well.

“I thought it would just be more family,” Misty said. “Just us crossing the trails and things and not having to push our way through everyone.”

The hills have avoided some of Zion’s most famous hikes due to overcrowding at the trailhead.

“We were actually going to do Angel’s Landing, but because of the crowds we decided not to do it,” Layne said.

“Yeah, we thought it would be dangerous,” Misty added.

Long queues and waiting times to enter parks are more and more frequent. Zion and Arches are already seeing monthly visit rates exceeding their pre-pandemic levels.

If we had over 610,000 visitors in May of this year alone, compared to over 529,000 in May 2019. The latest data for Arches comes from April, with nearly 194,000 visitors this year compared to more than 168,000 in 2019.

READ: Zion National Park designated as International Dark Sky Park

Bryce Canyon, which has seen a steady increase in visits over the past decade, is still catching up to pre-pandemic rates. It welcomed nearly 299,000 visitors in May and nearly 328,000 people came to the park in May 2019.

High attendance figures have some in communities like Moab and Springdale calling for a reservation system, or scheduled entry, that would stagger entry into the park. Some argue it would help reduce overcrowding and give rangers the ability to maintain the trails.

“I think that would be a good idea. Especially for Angel’s Landing, it’s just too dangerous,” Layne said.

“Just for the security concerns, I think this would be a great option,” Misty added.

Others believe it would hurt local businesses. A 2018 study commissioned by the National Parks Service found that a reservation system would take $ 22 million out of Moab’s economy in its first year.

READ: Zion National Park warns of toxins in Virgin River

Supporters report a reservation program implemented by Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, where the neighboring town of Estes Park saw a sales tax increase as visitors shopped and dined in town in waiting to enter the park.

The Zion National Park information officer was not available for an on-camera interview for this story, but said over the phone that the park has been breaking monthly visitation records since September, and they don’t expect not to stop him at all times. soon.

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Salt lake city government

Talks continue around a possible expansion and renovation of the Civic Center


After voters raised their voices, rejecting the most recent link surrounding the renovation and expansion of the Amarillo Civic Center complex in November, Amarillo officials are looking for other ways to fund the project.

During Tuesday’s Amarillo city council meeting, the council is expected to take action on a pre-development contract with Garfield Public / Private LLC for professional services related to the Amarillo Civic Center complex. According to the agenda item, the costs for this pre-development period should not exceed $ 494,200 if the contract is approved.

History of Civic Center expansion plans

It comes after a committee was appointed earlier this year to examine the possibilities of a public / private partnership to fund improvements and potential expansion of the civic center complex. Amarillo voters have rejected a $ 275 million bond issue to help fund the $ 319 million civic center project proposed in November.

After:Potter County and Town make decision to repay Amarillo Potter venue district bonds

But 2020 was not the first time voters have raised their voices regarding the Civic Center complex. City manager Jared Miller said the first needs assessment for the facility was completed in 2012, with the first bond election not being passed by voters in 2016.

After the failed 2020 bond election, Miller said it was important for the city to understand possible next steps regarding improvements to the facility.

“What came out of that was the desire to understand where do we go from here, after the failed November 2020 election. What we heard in that election was, ‘Yes, we want to. totally do the project. We just don’t want to spend that much. We don’t want to have such a tax increase, ”Miller said.

At the last city council meeting, Amarillo Mayor Ginger Nelson said the city was looking for a way forward on the project.

“This is where we are as a board, just wanting to know how we go ahead and plan the project,” she said. “The existing facility has desperate needs and is not competitive. So you have to know. We listened to citizens and we heard what they were saying. We have appreciated this contribution, and now we must move forward with this contribution in mind. It is precisely this contribution that will guide us on how we move forward.

Committee conclusions

Andrew Freeman, director of city planning and development services and committee member, told council the committee had met with five potential public / private partners, with the committee recommending Garfield as the best option after many meetings.

“We think it makes sense to bring in a private partner to work with us on this business, to look at different opportunities, review our numbers, look at our revenue streams, maybe consider other ways to tap into the business. ‘installation that would save money and make this project viable,’ he said.

Jason Herrick, another committee member, said Garfield was the best match for Amarillo, helping the city shift the burdens and cost of a potential civic center complex project to the private market rather than d ” have an impact on taxpayers.

After:Amarillo City Council approves first step to explore potential City Hall relocation

“The vote that took place in November, for me, was very clear,” he said. “If we want to do a project that looks like this, it can’t look like what we did. We need to ease the burden on property tax owners, or it’s not something the citizens of Amarillo (are) going to want to do. ”

Garfield is a national developer who focuses on public and private partnerships, Greg Garfield, president of the company, told the board at its last meeting. The company has hosted projects ranging from performing arts centers to government office buildings in cities such as Salt Lake City, Abilene and Atlanta, as well as the Buddy Holly Hall of Performing Arts and Sciences in Lubbock.

Garfield told the board that his organization would be able to help identify potential private finance and funding options for the project, including private philanthropy and naming rights, as well as identify as much of the initial contribution as possible to reduce the amount of funding.

This pre-development strategic plan would serve as a “solid foundation,” Garfield said, giving council a plan for the potential of the project, how much it will cost, what its benefits might be for the community as well as public investment.

The process also includes conversations surrounding the scope of the project and identifying priorities, Garfield said. The organization would use the plans outlined during the many years of talks surrounding this project.

“We would like to see all the documents. I think the more up-to-date the document, the more relevant the information will be, ”he told the council. “But we want to get all of this information, and we want to capitalize on any good ideas that may have been produced by these other reports. But we think what’s generally different about the report we provide is that it’s a comprehensive plan. It’s not just a needs assessment, it’s not just a market student, it’s not just an architectural master plan. How is it financed? How do you prepare the case? Who is going to own it? … It really is a comprehensive plan; this is what we intend to provide.

After:City of Amarillo adds bike lanes to downtown, connecting to Rails to Trails

Miller said it would be the first time the city has considered a public / private partnership for a project. He stressed that the city would not consider this approach to the project unless it is of benefit to the community.

“We wouldn’t do a public / private partnership if it didn’t benefit our taxpayers,” he said. “That would be the only motive to do something like this, to make a project like this possible. It is a great generational project that does not come about easily.

This pre-development services agreement kicks off the process, Miller said, identifying what is needed regarding the Civic Center Complex project before creating a refined proposal. It would consist of a feasibility analysis and a general recommendation for the future of the project.

While there is no guarantee the project can come out of that deal with Garfield, Miller believes that investment should be made.

“Someone may ask, ‘Why would you spend over $ 400,000 on something that might not go to a project? “, Miller said. “We’re talking hundreds of millions of dollars… so it’s a prudent investment to explore all the opportunities we have to make this project a reality. It’s a project that I believe most people in our community want to see come to fruition. It’s just a project where we haven’t found the right price and scope to be able to give the community what they want.

And after?

If city council approves the deal with Garfield, Miller said the city expects the deal to be concluded by the end of the calendar year, which would also include two fiscal years for the city. Although this pre-development services agreement is the first phase, there could be later phases that will flow from the agreement down the road if it is successful.

“It’s still a significant amount of money. But it’s also an investment in identifying how we can move forward in one of the greatest opportunities or challenges, however you choose to view it, which we’ll have to decide. of how we are moving forward, ”Miller said. “The Civic Center is something that we just can’t (make a decision on). We need to figure out how to take care of this investment that we have had, made and nurtured for the past 50+ years.

The City Council meeting will be held Tuesday at 1 pm in the City Council Chamber, located on the third floor of City Hall, located at 601 S. Buchanan. For more information on the city of Amarillo, visit www.amarillo.gov.


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Salt lake city

‘RHOSLC’: Jen Shah reveals why couldn’t read Miranda’s rights waiver


“Real Housewives of Salt Lake City” star Jen Shah’s legal team suggested she couldn’t read her Miranda rights when she was arrested due to her “blurred vision” caused by contact lenses “dry,” reports People magazine.

Shah’s team said the “RHOSLC” star “was unable to read” the waiver to waive Miranda rights, which she allegedly signed upon her arrest in March, according to People magazine.

What are Miranda’s rights?

The Deseret News recently explained Miranda’s rights story, which reads: “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in court. You have the right to a lawyer. If you cannot afford a lawyer, you will be provided with one.

What happened to Jen Shah?

Shah was arrested in March “on charges of conspiracy to commit telemarketing wire fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering,” according to Deseret News.

What happened to the rights of Jen Shah and Miranda?

According to People magazine, Shah explained in a written statement that she was about to film an episode of “The Real Housewives of Salt Lake City” when she received a call about her husband. She decided to go home to find out what was going on. She said she was then told to stop and the police would meet her where she was. The police then came to arrest him.

  • “I was taken to the back of the car, handcuffed and told they had a warrant for my arrest,” Shah said in a statement, according to People magazine. “I was at this point very confused and emotionally unbalanced by the strange series of events, and I thought maybe I had been the victim of a misidentification.”

Next, Shah said she was taken to ICE headquarters, where she was handcuffed to a chair and given a printed copy of Miranda’s rights. She then said her eyesight made it difficult to sign, according to People magazine.

  • “Although I have heard the words Det. Bastos read clearly, my contact lenses, which were in my eyes, were dry and I didn’t have my reading glasses, so my vision was blurry and I was unable to read the paper in front of me, ”he said. she declared. “Even reading my rights, I didn’t fully understand what was going on and still thought that an explanation could be a potential misidentification.”

Shah said she heard all of Miranda’s rights but signed the page in the wrong places because of her blurry vision, according to People magazine. She was then handcuffed so that she could repair her contact lenses before being handcuffed again.

According to People magazine, his lawyers now claim that Shah, who signed the document on Miranda’s rights, “did not do it voluntarily, but rather as a direct result of the deception and cunning of the police. calculated to overcome his will “.


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Salt lakes real estate

Idaho’s drought could be solved by borrowing the Great Lakes


Do you think it’s hot for June? You haven’t seen ‘nuthin’ yet! A forecast I looked at this morning suggested triple-digit highs should become a routine at the end of next weekend and into the next week. The forecast also indicates that it is not raining. Keep in mind that these same long term forecasts are frequently subject to change, but I would like to make another point. Once a summer model sets in, they often stay with us for a while.

The water going down a pipe is already running. It is also not usually an environmental threat if water is leaking.

This is the second year of our drought. Some are seeing indications that it started even earlier. Last week, one of our gun show hosts recounted a previous seven-year drought. During its lifetime.

An old friend recently retired from a post as director of a science museum. He told me that in the past some parts of the west have experienced droughts that have lasted 200 years. I’m not sure we’re headed there, but I also remember a conversation from my days on TV 25 years ago.

The demographics already showed the enormous displacement of the population towards the west. Las Vegas was growing like gangbusters, and Scottsdale, Ariz. Did the same in the 1980s. Some guy told me the water would be shipped west of the Great Lakes. How? ‘Or’ What? By pipeline.

When you consider the opposition we have seen in recent years to building pipelines, it might sound silly. Or maybe not. The water going down a pipe is already running. It is also not usually an environmental threat if water is leaking.

Popular will is the key. Millions of thirsty Western voters will have a lot of influence on politics. As the region grows, so does its power in the United States House of Representatives. By design, the Senate is already sympathetic to Western concerns.

Lake Michigan could arrive in Idaho.

WATCH: Here are America’s 50 Best Beach Towns

Each beach town has its own set of pros and cons, which got us thinking about what makes a beach town the best to live in. To find out, Stacker took a look at WalletHub data, released on June 17, 2020, which compares US beach towns. Ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. The towns had a population of 10,000 to 150,000, but they had to have at least one local beach listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. From these rankings, we have selected the top 50. Readers who live in California and Florida will not be surprised to learn that many of the cities featured here are in one of these two states.

Read on to see if your favorite beach town has made the cut.


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Utah economy

American Airlines cancels hundreds of flights through mid-July, in part due to labor shortage

(CNN) – American Airlines cancels hundreds of flights until at least mid-July as company strives to maintain service amid massively surging travel demand as coronavirus pandemic continues to recede in states United, according to an airline spokesperson.

“The first weeks of June brought unprecedented weather conditions to our largest hubs, severely affecting our operations and causing delays, canceled flights and disruption to crew member schedules and our customers’ plans,” airline spokeswoman Shannon Gilson told CNN. . “This, combined with the labor shortages some of our suppliers face and the incredibly rapid rise in customer demand, has resulted in us building the resilience and certainty of our operations by adjusting a fraction of our flights scheduled until mid-July. “

Yet the fraction of targeted cancellations amounts to hundreds of flights up to mid-July. American Airlines recorded 120 cancellations on Saturday and the company expects 50 to 80 flight cancellations per day going forward, according to Gibson.

Industries across the country have struggled to hire employees as the economy tries to return to pre-pandemic normal.

Customers who had been booked through July 15 will be notified or have already received notifications if their flights have been canceled so they can make travel adjustments in advance, Gibson said.

Gibson also said the cancellations will be spread across its system, to minimize the impact in a single area, although there is a larger effect at Dallas-Fort Worth, an American Airlines hub.

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Salt lake city government

USU Data Law Expert Appointed To State Privacy Commission – Cache Valley Daily


Chris Koopman, executive director of the Center for Growth and Opportunity at Utah State University, has been appointed by Governor Spencer Cox to the state’s new Privacy Oversight Commission.

SALT LAKE CITY – Governor Spencer Cox has appointed the executive director of Utah State University’s Center for Growth and Opportunity as part of a new state privacy watchdog group.

USU’s Chris Koopman will bring his expertise in data privacy law to Utah’s new Personal Data Privacy Oversight Commission.

Koopman was one of 12 legal and technology experts named to this panel Thursday in a joint announcement by Cox, Attorney General Sean Reyes and State Auditor John Dougall.

“Protecting the privacy of all Utahns has become even more important as technology has progressed,” Cox explained. “I am delighted to see this new Privacy Commission convening and look forward to developing policies that will hold the state accountable for the use of personal data and information of the Utahns.”

Spokeswoman Nicole Davis of the State Auditor’s Office explained that the Privacy Oversight Commission was created by the passage of Bill 243 during the 2021 general session of the Legislative Assembly.

The objective of this legislation is to provide guidelines for the use of emerging technologies for public officials, in particular law enforcement.

As Executive Director of the USU Center for Growth and Opportunity, Koopman specializes in technology regulation, competition and innovation.

His research and commentary have been published in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today, as well as on the Bloomberg Network and National Public Radio.

Prior to joining USU, Koopman was a senior researcher and director of the technology policy program at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University.

He is currently an Affiliate Principal Investigator at the Mercatus Center and a member of the Information Technology and Emerging Technologies Working Group of the Federalist Society Regulatory Transparency Project.

Other Utahns appointed to the Personal Data Privacy Oversight Commission by Cox include Quinn Fowers, a Weber County internet technologist; Aliahu “Alli” Bey, cybersecurity expert; Nayana Penmetsa, representing private companies; and Keith Squires, the acting security officer at the University of Utah.

Reyes’ panel appointments include Jeff Gray, representing the attorney general’s office, and Utah County Sheriff Mike Smith.

Dougall’s appointments include Matthew Weller, president of All West Communications; Amy Knapp, cybersecurity expert; Brandon Greenwood; representing the interests of private technology industries; Phillip J. Windley, an expert in data privacy law from Brigham Young University; and Marina Lowe, representing the American Civil Liberties Union of Utah.

Under state law, the Personal Privacy Oversight Commission is responsible for developing best practices for privacy protection that state agencies can adopt. The panel is also empowered to conduct reviews of government uses of technology to protect privacy and data security.






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Salt lake city

Jen Shah is a “Real Housewives of SLC” star, and her legal issues will take center stage in Season 2


For most TV stars, getting arrested for cheating on little old ladies with their savings would be the end of their careers. Even before the case goes to trial, it would, in all likelihood, force their shows to be canceled.

This is true even at a time when it has become common practice for politicians to tell us that what we saw happen on television did not actually happen.

But that is not true if you are one of the “Real Housewives of Salt Lake City“. Jen Shah’s arrest and impending trial is potentially the biggest thing that can happen for the Bravo series.

Are you kidding? “Real Housewives” is a TV set about a train wreck – we can’t help but watch the carnage – and it could turn out to be one of the biggest pile-ups in franchise history. And there have been almost 1,500 episodes of “Real Housewives” to date, with all the different players in all the different cities.

“Real Housewives” is all about the drama, and what better drama than when – in the middle of filming – your most controversial actor is handcuffed and arrested, facing allegations that she and her assistant “flaunted their lifestyle lavish to the public as a symbol of their success “as they carried out a fraudulent telemarketing scheme that took advantage of hundreds of” vulnerable, often elderly, working class people “?

(Photo courtesy of Fred Hayes / Bravo) The fallout from the brawl at the surprise birthday party two episodes ago continues to plague Whitney Rose, Meredith Marks, Jen Shah and Lisa Barlow in “The Real Housewives of Salt Lake City “.

Sounds like golden notes for Bravo! Don’t you see executive producer Andy Cohen and the Bravo executives jumping up and down and clapping wildly when they hear the news?

To be clear, neither the show’s producers nor Bravo executives have commented on all of this. (This is nothing new. Bravo has a long-standing policy of not releasing any information about the cable channel’s reality shows until a new batch of episodes air.) Officially, they don’t even have to. confirmed which Housewives will be featured in season 2 of “RHOSLC. Unofficially, the six cast from season one are all said to be back, along with at least one newcomer.

(I would have predicted that Lisa Barlow, Heather Gay, Meredith Marks, and Whitney Rose would be likely to return. But, while it’s true that Mary Cosby is back, I’m a little surprised after she’s all but gone by several. Season 1 episodes – and looked like a pretty terrible person when she appeared, most of the time.)

(Photo courtesy of Fred Hayes / Bravo) Jen Shah and Mary Cosby in “The Real Housewives of Salt Lake City”.

As for Shah, it’s an open secret that she resumed filming after her arrest in March.

The latest development in the court case is that Shah’s lawyers have requested that the case be dropped. This is not an unusual gesture, and it usually does not work. And it should be noted that Shah has pleaded not guilty.

Shah’s lawyers argue that the indictment “is not at all clear” about how a crime was committed, and the prosecution has mostly refused to clarify. And they’re not happy that prosecutors threw more than 1.3 million documents – along with hundreds of electronic devices – into the mix. “This information cannot be adequately examined over the course of a lifetime,” they argue.

I am not a lawyer, but that seems to be a valid point.

The 57-page dossier contains a lot of legal jargon that will not appear on the show. It boils down to this: Shah’s lawyers claim she hasn’t committed any crime – and they want the charges dropped.

But the case file may give us a glimpse of what we’ll see happen when “RHOSLC” returns for Season 2 – including that Shah wants his post-arrest statements deleted because detectives allegedly lied to him and that ‘she was’ in a very emotional state due to the combination of strange phone calls she received on the morning of her arrest and her history with a convicted felon who had victimized her in New York City.

And giving up her right to remain silent shouldn’t be taken into account, her lawyers say, as her contacts had dried up, her vision was blurry and she didn’t know what she was signing.

THIS IS THE Jen Shah we came to know and love (or hate) in Season 1!

Do not mistake yourself. This is serious stuff. If found guilty, Shah could be sentenced to decades in prison.

But, clearly, that will be the big news for season 2 of “RHOSLC”. Which is, like it or not, Bravo continues to transform into intelligently constructed entertainment. This is the really juicy stuff, and it happens to the most convincing housewife in Utah.

Jen Shah is a lot of things, but she’s not. Her often temperamental demeanor – followed by the inevitable excuses and explanations, sometimes accompanied by abject apologies – drove the series narrative more than any other woman in Season 1. She looks absolutely charming for a minute and angry, resentful. and vindictive the following.

In a recent edition of the “So Bad It’s Good With Ryan Bailey” podcast, compatriot Heather Gay, who has had a top-down relationship with Shah, said, “He’s a star. When you’re in the room with she is magnetic and charismatic.

For the record, my few contacts with Shah let me love him. And, more often than not, sympathize with her.

(Photo courtesy of Bravo) Sharrieff and Jen Shah in episode 10 of “Real Housewives of Salt Lake City“.

Jen has a lot to deal with, but watching her husband, University of Utah assistant football coach Sharrieff Shah, do just that was a surprisingly charming aspect of the series.

Again, I have no legal training and no idea how this is going to turn out. I have no way of knowing if Shah is guilty of anything. For the sake of her family, I hope she isn’t.

And, to complicate matters even further, what about the little old ladies (and men) she’s accused of making fun of?

It will be interesting to see how the producers play this out. They love to create suspense, but it won’t be a surprise when Shah is arrested. And, assuming it goes to mid-October, as planned, that’ll be well after Season 2 production ends. (And maybe even before it starts airing.)

We don’t know when it will be. Season 1 premiered in November 2020, but we’ll have to see if Season 2 follows the same timeline.

Whenever that happens, Season 2 will show us how other housewives are reacting to Shah’s arrest and its aftermath. Like Bravo, this will be their chance to rise above – or sink into – the gutter.

The highway could be a more noble choice for all concerned; getting deeper into the mud will be more entertaining.


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Salt lake city

Salt Lake City celebrates Juneteenth


SALT LAKE CITY – Cheers rang out in Salt Lake City, from Washington Square Park to Liberty Park, in honor of Juneteenth.

Saturday was the first time it had been recognized as a federal holiday – a day commemorating the emancipation of enslaved African Americans, dating back to 1865.

“We really wanted to take a step back from a rally or a protest and really celebrate what it’s like to be black in America,” said Abena Bakenra.

The day, recently declared a federal holiday, brought people of all ages together with music, food and vendors.

For some, walking and celebrating are a way for them to express themselves.

“Today, I hope my voice speaks and people understand what is happening with people of color,” said Rosette Balati.

Others say they appreciate the chance to come together as a community.

“Our goal is to make it look like you’re driving near a park and you’re like, ‘I would love to have this family. “We are that family,” said Alicea Arnold, co-founder of Strength in Shades.

The events held at both parks drew hundreds of people who showed their support and consulted with vendors throughout the day. Despite the nearly 100-degree weather, participants say it was well worth it to deal with those hot temperatures.

READ: Cox issues proclamation commemorating June 19 as Juneteenth in Utah

Some celebrants say that if they are thankful for the official holiday, this is just the beginning.

“There is definitely so much more for the black community to do, so this is definitely just the start,” said Rosine Nibishaka.


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Utah economy

Las Vegas pushes land swap to balance growth and conservation – St George News

This file photo, Feb. 9, 2005, shows the suburbs of Las Vegas from the top of the Stratosphere Tower looking west on Sahara Avenue towards the Spring Mountains. Despite the drought, cities in the American West expect their populations to increase dramatically over the next several decades. From Phoenix to Boise, officials are working to ensure they have the resources, infrastructure and housing supply needed to meet growth projections. In parts of the region, their efforts are limited by the fact that sprawling metropolitan areas are surrounded by federally owned land. US Senator Catherine Cortez Masto Wants To Fix Las Vegas Problem By Tightening Protections Of Some Public Land While Approving The Sale Of Others To Commercial And Residential Developers | Associated Press File Photo by Joe Cavaretta, St. George News

CARSON CITY, Nevada (AP) – The record heat and historic drought in the western United States does little to discourage cities from planning to welcome millions of new residents in the decades to come.

In this October 11, 2016 file photo, a gypsum mine owned by developer Jim Rhodes, who wants to develop housing on the site, is seen in the foreground while the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area is seen in the distance . Despite the drought, cities in the American West expect their populations to increase dramatically over the next several decades. | Photo courtesy of LE Baskow / Las Vegas Sun via AP, St. George News

From Phoenix to Boise, authorities are preparing for a future that is both more human and less water-intensive, seeking to balance growth and conservation. Development is constrained by the fact that 46% of the western region of 11 states is federal land, managed by agencies like the US Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management who are responsible for maintaining it for future generations.

This has led officials in states like Nevada and Utah to press the federal government to approve land transfers to allow developers to build homes and businesses on what was previously land. public. Supporters of both states have wowed environmentalists in the past with provisions that allocate revenue to conservation projects, preserve other federal lands, and prevent road construction, logging, or energy exploration.

A small group of opponents argue that the systematic endorsement of this type of “trade” to facilitate growth is not sustainable, especially in areas that depend on dwindling water supplies.

For the seven states that depend on the Colorado River – Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming – a regional drought is so severe that less water is flowing to Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the two artificial reservoirs where the river water is stored.

If the level of Lake Mead continues to decline throughout the summer as planned, the federal government will likely issue its very first official declaration of shortage, leading to reductions in the water share that Arizona and Nevada have. receive.

The situation is playing out in the Las Vegas area, where environmental groups, local officials and home builders have united behind a proposal from U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto that was heard in the Senate this week.

The Nevada Democrat is pushing what she calls the largest conservation bill in state history to designate more than 3,125 square miles of land for additional protections – roughly the size of Delaware and the United States. Rhode Island combined – and 48 square miles for commercial and residential development, which is about the size of San Francisco.

Some environmentalists support the proposal because it would add federal land to the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area for recreation and reclassify undeveloped parts of Clark County, where Las Vegas is located, and the Desert National Wildlife Refuge as Bureau of Land Management’s “wilderness areas”, which offer stronger protections than national parks.

Jocelyn Torres, field director for the Conservation Lands Foundation, said during the Senate hearing on Wednesday that the protections would restore the lands to capture carbon more effectively, which would help mitigate rising temperatures.

“Our public lands present our best chance to tackle climate change, our biodiversity crisis and invest in our local communities and economy,” she said.

FILE – In this August 13, 2020 file photo, a light mineral tub ring marks the high water mark of Lake Mead in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area near Boulder City, Nevada | Photo by John Locher / Associated Press, St. George News

The effort reflects land management efforts over the past decade in Washington and Emery counties in Utah to designate the wilderness and sell other plots to developers to meet growth projections. The US Census Bureau reported that St. George, in Washington County, was the fifth fastest growing metropolitan area in the country last year.

In both regions, affordable housing is one of the authorities’ main concerns. Soaring house prices in California have added to a flow of people leaving for neighboring states like Nevada, Arizona and Colorado, where open land, lower tax rates and jobs attract new residents.

The fast growing Las Vegas area lacks housing supply to meet projected population growth. A 2019 study from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, which found that references to Cortez Masto’s legislation predicted that the population of Clark County would increase by 35%, to 3.1 million, from by 2060. This peak will be difficult to manage without building in existing communities or public lands.

“As a result of this federal ownership, our planning and development options are very limited and require constant coordination with federal agencies,” said Marcie Henson, director of the Clark County Air Quality Department.

Growth can stretch an already limited water supply. Water officials back the proposal, which allocates funds for the maintenance of canals used to recycle sewage through Lake Mead. The region has adopted some of the most aggressive conservation measures in the American West, including an outright ban on decorative grass in some places, to prepare for growth.

Last year, water officials predicted a worst-case scenario in which consumption patterns and climate change could force them to find alternative supplies as early as 2056. Critics say the projections are concerning.

“This legislation has no sustainable water supply identified in 50 years,” said Kyle Roerink, executive director of the Nevada-based Great Basin Water Network conservation group. “When you combine that with everything we read about Lake Mead and the Colorado River, it is very precarious to introduce a bill that invites 825,000 more people into the Mojave Desert. “

Southern Nevada Water Authority chief executive John Entsminger said in a statement that the proposal “helps secure the water resources and facilities that SNWA needs to provide reliable and safe water to our customers for decades to come “.

When Cortez Masto’s proposal was brought forward, there was little question of how water accommodates future growth plans or whether the conservation elements of the bill might have an impact.

Roerink said the plan’s funding allocations for water infrastructure must be accompanied by additional “serious and realistic modeling” of the Colorado River.

“When an entity says, ‘Let’s go build houses in this area’, it implies that the water will be there in perpetuity,” he said.

Written by SAM METZ, Associated Press / Report for America.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Salt lake city government

Utah Senate Speaker Calls “Regarding” Tribune Report on Co-Diagnosis


Stuart Adams says the legislature has already authorized an audit, which is expected in the fall.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Senate Speaker Stuart Adams, R-Layton, during a special session at the State Capitol in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, May 19, 2021.

After a recent Salt Lake Tribune report that the Securities and Exchange Commission investigated how Salt Lake City Co-Diagnostics COVID-19 tests were used during Silicon Slopes’ TestUtah initiative, the Senate Speaker Stuart Adams, R-Layton, information as “relating to”.

The Tribune’s investigation found that a Silicon Slopes board member used his connections with Senator Mitt Romney’s office to seek help with FDA approval for the tests. Adams said in an email that the legislature authorized an audit of the Utah Department of Health by the legislative auditor general in October, and that he expects them to present their findings this fall when the audit will be completed.

According to legislative site, the legislative audit subcommittee decided to “prioritize an efficiency and effectiveness audit of the Utah Department of Health” on October 13, as well as “an audit of data and criteria that government entities use to make critical decisions related to COVID-19 ”. The motion was carried with a 5-0 vote.

“Last year we were in the middle of a pandemic and we were trying to save lives and livelihoods,” Adams wrote in an email. “We were informed that there was a charitable effort from these companies to help during this crisis. It is baffling to learn of the financial gains and the SEC investigation. We need more information to fully understand what happened.

Last year, state officials, including Adams, wanted to make the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine available to the Utahns as an off-label treatment for COVID-19.

Meds In Motion Pharmacy CEO and pharmacist Dan Richards, who admitted to mislabeling one of his imported drugs as a herbal supplement, contacted state officials in March to alert them that he had purchased approximately 1,760 pounds of crude hydroxychloroquine. His efforts to stock the drug have drawn support from officials like Adams, who was with the pharmacist at a March press conference at the State Capitol to promote the drugs.

Utah officials contacted by Richards insist they did not know Richards was mislabeling the drug until he was charged.


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Utah economy

Moderate Iranian candidate concedes victory for head of the judiciary Ebrahim Raisi

The only moderate in the Iranian presidential election conceded defeat on Saturday morning to the country’s head of radical justice. It signaled that Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei’s protégé won a vote he dominated after his stronger competitor was disqualified.

Former moderate head of the Central Bank Abdolnasser Hemmati and former Revolutionary Guard commander Mohsen Rezaei congratulated Ebrahim Raisi.

In the first results, Raisi won 17.8 million votes, compared to 3.3 million for Rezaei and 2.4 million for Hemmati, said Jamal Orf, head of the electoral headquarters of Iran’s interior ministry. The fourth candidate in the race, Amirhossein Ghazizadeh Hashemi, got around 1 million votes, Orf said.

The first results announced also appeared to show that the race had the lowest turnout in the country since the Islamic Revolution of 1979. However, the vote did not have international observers to monitor the election as in previous years.

This makes Raisi – who faces US sanctions for his role in the mass executions – the clear winner of the race. It was then that his candidacy sparked widespread apathy among eligible voters in the Islamic Republic, which has long retained participation as a sign of support for the theocracy since its 1979 Islamic revolution.

The swift concessions, while not unusual in previous Iranian elections, signaled what semi-official news agencies in Iran had hinted at for hours: that the carefully controlled vote had been a resounding victory for Raisi amid the calls from some for a boycott.

Hemmati offered his congratulations on Instagram to Raisi early on Saturday.

“I hope that your administration is a source of pride for the Islamic Republic of Iran, improves the economy and life with comfort and well-being for the great Iranian nation,” he wrote.

On Twitter, Rezaei congratulated Khamenei and the Iranian people for participating in the vote.

“God willing, the decisive election of my esteemed brother Ayatollah Dr Seyyed Ebrahim Raisi promises the establishment of a strong and popular government to solve the country’s problems,” Rezaei wrote.

As night fell on Friday, the turnout appeared to be much lower than in the last Iranian presidential election in 2017. At a polling station in a mosque in central Tehran, a Shiite cleric played football with a youth. boy while most of his employees were napping in a yard. In another, officials watched videos on their cellphones as state television screamed alongside them, offering only tight shots of locations across the country – as opposed to long election lines. past.

Voting ended at 2 a.m. on Saturday, after the government extended the vote to accommodate what it called “overcrowding” at several polling stations nationwide. The paper ballots, crammed into large plastic boxes, were to be counted by hand overnight, and authorities said they expected to have the first results and turnout numbers by Saturday morning at the most. early.

“My vote will not change anything in this election, the number of people voting for Raisi is huge and Hemmati does not have the skills to do this,” said Hediyeh, a 25-year-old woman who gave only her first name. . rushing to a taxi in Haft-e Tir Square after avoiding the ballot box. “I don’t have a candidate here.”

Iranian state television has sought to downplay participation, singling out the Arab sheikhs in the Gulf around it, led by hereditary rulers and low participation in Western democracies. After a day of escalating authorities’ attempts to get the vote out, state television overnight aired scenes from crowded voting booths in several provinces, seeking to portray a last-minute rush to the polls.

But since the 1979 revolution toppled the shah, the Iranian theocracy has cited voter turnout as a sign of its legitimacy, starting with its first referendum which won 98.2% support and which simply asked if people wanted or not an Islamic Republic.

The disqualifications affected reformists and supporters of Rouhani, whose administration both struck the 2015 nuclear deal with world powers and saw it disintegrate three years later with America’s unilateral withdrawal. of the deal by then-President Donald Trump. Former radical president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, also barred from running, said on social media that he would boycott the vote.

Voter apathy has also been fueled by the devastated state of the economy and a moderate campaign amid months of rising coronavirus cases. Poll workers wore gloves and masks, and some wiped the ballot boxes with disinfectants.

If elected, Raisi would be the first sitting Iranian president to be sanctioned by the US government even before taking office for his involvement in the mass execution of political prisoners in 1988, as well as for his tenure as head. of the internationally criticized Iranian justice system – one of the best executioners in the world.

It would also firmly put hard-line supporters in control across the government as negotiations in Vienna continue in an attempt to salvage a tattered deal meant to limit Iran’s nuclear program at a time when Tehran is enriching Iran. uranium at its highest level ever recorded, although it is still short. weapon quality levels. Tensions remain high with the United States and Israel, which reportedly carried out a series of attacks targeting Iranian nuclear sites and assassinated the scientist who created his military atomic program decades earlier.

Whoever wins will likely serve two four-year terms and therefore could lead what could be one of the most pivotal moments for the country in decades – the death of Khamenei, 82. Speculation has already started that Raisi could be a candidate for the post, along with Khamenei’s son, Mojtaba.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.
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Salt lake city

Why “Real Housewives of Salt Lake City” star Jen Shah wants her case closed


“Real Housewives of Salt Lake City” star Jen Shah has asked a judge to dismiss her telemarketing fraud case, NBC News reports.

Why was Shah arrested?

In March 2021, Shah and Stuart Smith, of Lehi, were arrested “on charges of conspiracy to commit telemarketing-related wire fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering,” according to Deseret News. .

What did Jen Shah ask the judge?

Shah’s legal team argued in court documents that the charges and indictment against her are “not at all clear,” NBC News reports.

Shah’s camp maintains that prosecutors used “vague language and sleight of hand” in their indictment.

  • “This information cannot be adequately investigated over the course of a lifetime and requires, as we argue below, that the government clarify the charges in a way that this relatively straightforward indictment does not. Shah’s lawyers wrote, according to NBC News.
  • “Nowhere does the indictment allege, as required, sufficient facts to establish that Ms. Shah joined in this alleged conspiracy willfully and with the specific intention of defrauding telemarketing buyers,” they said. writes, according to NBC News. “Thus, this indictment should be dismissed because the facts it alleges, even if considered to be true, are insufficient to substantiate the crimes charged. “

According to USA Today, Shah’s team argued that authorities also forced her to give up her rights to Miranda upon her arrest.

  • According to Findlaw.com, “To expressly waive Miranda’s rights, the suspect will state (or sign something indicating) that he is waiving the right to remain silent or the right to have a lawyer present.”

But his lawyers said Shah “did not do it on purpose, but rather as a direct result of the deception and cunning of the law enforcement agencies calculated to overcome his will.”

What’s next for Jen Shah?

It is not known what will happen next in the case. The New York Police Department and the Southern District of New York City attorney’s office did not respond to comments on the matter, according to USA Today. So we don’t know what the judge will do.


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Salt lake city

The University of Utah: Celebrate and Reflect on June


June 18, 2021

On the eve of June 17 of this year, we reflect on the significance of June 19, 1865, a day now commemorated as a federal holiday to mark the end of slavery in the United States. As leaders of the University of Utah, we echo the call to use this new national holiday as a day of reflection and action.

While we recognize this important national legislation as a critical step in our country’s work to address our history of racism, we recognize that there is still a lot of work to be done. Our efforts to dismantle systemic racism require continued attention and a strong commitment to fostering this work on our campus.

To that end, the university fully endorses the June resolution of the Utah higher education system which calls on higher education to continue its commitments and actions to advance fairness, justice and accountability. You can read the full resolution from USHE here.

As you reflect on Juneteenth, we ask that you take the time to learn about the ongoing work of our Equity, Diversity & Inclusion team, as well as what Juneteenth means to members of our University community. Both of these resources are available here:

We look forward to celebrating and commemorating this important day in the years to come with programming and events that mark the significance of this event. We encourage everyone at all levels of the university to do the same.

Truly,

Michael Bon | Acting President

Dan Reed | Senior Vice-President, Academic Affairs

Mary Ann Villarreal | Vice President for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion

Lori McDonald | Vice-President of Student Affairs

Jeff Herring | Human Resources Director


This press release was produced by the University of Utah. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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Salt lake city government

Utah Vietnam veteran receives replacement medals for those he lost 20 years ago


Utah Senator Mitt Romney presents Richard DeGooyer with replacement medals for his Vietnam service in Salt Lake City on June 18, 2021 (Derek Petersen, KSL TV)

SALT LAKE CITY – Richard DeGooyer said when he returned home from serving in the US Army in the Vietnam War, he was told not to wear his uniform, only Levi’s.

He wore jeans again on Friday, but was able to joke with Utah Senator Mitt Romney as they met in the downtown federal building. “We both wear Levi’s,” they laughed.

DeGooyer and his family reached out to Romney’s office recently, hoping for help securing replacement medals for those he lost 20 years ago.

“It’s beautiful, thank you, sir,” DeGooyer said.

“. , and the marksman badge and rifle bar.

“Very honored, very honored to meet the senator, and it is an honor for all veterans,” DeGooyer told KSL afterwards. He said he was grateful for the help and recognition he had received from the government and VA as well.

Romney said it was his privilege to make the presentation.

“I’m glad we were able to secure replacement medals for him to recognize his service to our country,” Romney said. “People like me have a special place in our hearts for those who served in Vietnam. They did not get the respect they deserved.”

Romney had spent the morning meeting recent high school graduates from Utah en route to various service academies in various branches of the military. They also stayed in the room to watch the presentation and applaud DeGooyer.

The 74-year-old vet said he was grateful to see the young people who would be the next generation to serve the country.

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Salt lake city government

Amos Guiora: Israel’s new eight-party coalition government


For the first time in 12 years, the Israeli parliament voted to overthrow Benjamin Netanyahu as prime minister in favor of a new coalition government made up of eight different political parties that range from right to left on the political spectrum . The coalition appointed Naftali Bennett, leader of the right-wing Yamina party, as prime minister for the first two years of the coalition’s four-year term. The last two years will be led by Yair Lapid of the centrist Yesh Atid party, which built the coalition.

AtTheU spoke with Amos Guiora, a law professor at SJ Quinney College of Law at the University of Utah. Guiora has published extensively on issues related to enabling factors in sexual assault, institutional complicity, bystanders, national security, interrogation limits and human rights. He served in the Israel Defense Forces as a colonial lieutenant for 19 years, including as legal advisor to the Gaza Strip.

Guiora divides his time between Salt Lake City and Jerusalem, Israel, where he has lived for two months.

You are in Israel right now. What do you think of the coming to power of the new coalition government?

Full disclosure: I participated in weekly rallies against Benjamin Netanyahu at the Prime Minister’s home. The reason is that I believe that a prime minister who has been charged with corruption, bribery and breach of trust cannot be prime minister, even if the law does not prohibit it. The law prohibits a minister from serving in the government if indicted, but not the prime minister.

For people of my political inclination, there is a sense that Netanyahu was destroying state intuitions – he was actively trying to cause significant harm to the Justice Department, courts, and other organs of the state. He is on trial as we speak and, those of my political ilk suggest that he is doing everything possible to ensure that the trial does not proceed.

This election has been described as historic. Why is this this?

The new government is called the government of “change”. It is a unique coalition made up of eight different parties ranging from the political left to the political right. In Israel, the words right and left have only one definition – that’s how you see the resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

What makes it unique are a number of things. We certainly haven’t had such a broad coalition government spanning the spectrum from left to right, but there are two other important reasons. One is that for the first time in Israel’s history, a member of an Israeli Arab party is part of the government. The second thing that makes him unique is that the new prime minister, Bennet, is what we in America would call modern orthodoxy and here we would call him religious nationalist. He is the first prime minister to wear a kippah, also known as a kippah, in the Israeli government. It is also the first time in at least 12 years that Orthodox Jewish parties have not been represented in government. Orthodox parties are seen as allies of Netanyahu’s Likud party.

In terms of the right-left make-up of the coalition, there is Meretz, which is the left-wing party and Labor, which is center-left, and they would be all in favor of a Palestinian state to resolve the issue. conflict. Bennet’s party is right-wing and opposes a Palestinian state; however, he is considered liberal on social issues. The other parties are centrist. But frankly, on Bennet’s to-do list, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is not a priority. All parties want to preserve-restore the country’s institutions and ensure the proper functioning of the government.

How will the management work?

It is a rotating government, Bennet will be prime minister for the first two years, Lapid thereafter for the next two years. Lapid’s party is the largest in the coalition, but Bennet’s party is the swing party. In order to get them into the coalition to defeat Netanyahu, Lapid had to offer Bennet the prime minister’s first rotation. It’s not just for votes – if this government lasts four years, Lapid will be prime minister for the last two years.

Why would these disparate parties come together?

I think the reason these eight parties got together is one, they’re against Netanyahu, and two, I think they’re going to seek to reestablish a sense of normalcy like in respect for norms, respect for democratic values. But – and there are buts here, because there will be challenges. We have violence in Gaza, there are obviously other tensions, especially in Iran. Bennet will have to face Hamas, he will have to establish relations with President Biden, especially concerning Iran, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, while trying to restore standards of democracy and a civil society.

Are you optimistic about the survival of this coalition?

Well, it’s too early. Am i happy Yes, absolutely because I am convinced that the eight of them understand the task at hand, I am convinced that they are not corrupt, I am convinced that they have no intention of destroying the institutions of the state. And I believe – I’m not naive, I’ve been around the block – that they will respect justice. The government ministers who have been appointed seem to me competent and will not engage in disorderly incitement unlike the Netanyahu government. Netanyahu incited against the left, incited against the media, incited against the Arabs, and that just won’t be how this government works. For me, this is a welcome relief.

I am also aware that they have enormous challenges. But I have a feeling that they will be guided by the interest of the state rather than by self-interest.


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Salt lakes real estate

7 beautiful lakes to visit in NH besides Lake Winnipesaukee


Warm weather is coming to New England and now is a good time to take the water to cool off. If you’re looking for a shark-free aquatic experience, lakes abound in New Hampshire. Since the lockdown restrictions were lifted, people have flocked to Lake Winnipesaukee, but it’s not the only lake in New Hampshire. Try these lakes for a little less crowds. There is no guarantee that there will be no crowds, but these lakes are smaller.

7 beautiful lakes to visit in New Hampshire besides Lake Winnipesaukee

WATCH: Here are America’s 50 Best Beach Towns

Each beach town has its own set of pros and cons, which got us thinking about what makes a beach town the best to live in. To find out, Stacker took a look at WalletHub data, released on June 17, 2020, which compares US beach towns. Ratings are based on six categories: affordability, weather, safety, economy, education and health, and quality of life. The towns had a population of 10,000 to 150,000, but they had to have at least one local beach listed on TripAdvisor. Read the full methodology here. From these rankings, we have selected the top 50. Readers who live in California and Florida won’t be surprised to learn that many of the cities featured here are in one of these two states.

Read on to see if your favorite beach town has made the cut.

WATCH: This is the richest city in every state

Just saying the names of these towns immediately conjures up images of grand mansions, fancy cars, and fancy restaurants. Read on to see which city in your home state received the title of richest place and which place had the highest median income in the country. Who knows, your hometown might even be on this list.


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Salt lakes real estate

Brutal New Jersey school year ends on a touching note


Sad. Only. Boring. Confusing. Frustrating. These are just a few of the words my 10 year old son has used at different times this year to describe what he has been through at different times. I mean, it was definitely not a typical school year and not for the best. However, it ended on a positive note as evidenced by this must-see video.

Listen to JB Afternoon on 92.7 WOBM and download our free 92.7 WOBM app.

Berkeley Township Elementary School – – Credit JB

Although I know it was not the same experience and the kids missed the socialization and probably some level of education was sacrificed, but it wasn’t that bad. In fact, there was a lot of good. My son’s teachers were all upbeat, outgoing and helpful with him and my family throughout the year. I know the students and parents have had a very difficult year, but so have the teachers and the school administration. I have so much respect for the job they all did while dealing with adversity and navigating really tough situations. That’s why the video below from the Berkeley Township School District really warmed my heart. After going through virtual education, social distancing, masks, etc. the most difficult school year (certainly in my lifetime) was drawing to a close and it ended with smiles, cries and waves of joy.


How did you experience this school year? How is your family ? Congratulations to all the students, teachers, professors and families who survived 2021. We will all be stronger for it! PS: what do you think of this list?

WATCH: This is the richest city in every state

Just saying the names of these towns immediately conjures up images of grand mansions, fancy cars, and fancy restaurants. Read on to see which city in your home state received the title of richest location and which place had the highest median income in the country. Who knows, your hometown might even be on this list.

WATCH: Here are the 25 Best Places to Live in New Jersey

Stacker has compiled a list of the best places to live in New Jersey using data from Niche. Niche ranks places to live based on a variety of factors including cost of living, schools, healthcare, recreation, and weather. Cities, suburbs and villages have been included. Ads and images are from realtor.com.

On the list, there is a robust mix of offerings ranging from large schools and nightlife to public and pedestrian parks. Some regions have experienced rapid growth thanks to the installation of new businesses in the region, while others offer a glimpse into the history of the region with well-preserved architecture and museums. Read on to see if your hometown makes the list.


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Utah economy

Nu Skin Enterprises to Present at the Jefferies Consumer Conference

Provo – Nu Skin Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE: NUS) announced today that President and CEO-elect Ryan Napierski and CFO Mark Lawrence will present at the Jefferies Virtual Consumer Conference on Tuesday, June 22, 2021. They will share their views on the emergence of social commerce and the odd-job economy and how they empower people.

The company presentation will be webcast live starting at 2:40 p.m. ET. Those wishing to access the event can visit the Nu Skin Investor Relations page on ir.nuskin.com. The archives of the webcast will be available at the same location until Tuesday, July 6, 2021.

About Nu Skin Enterprises, Inc.
Founded over 35 years ago, Nu Skin Enterprises, Inc. (NSE) provides innovative businesses with sustainable solutions, opportunities, technologies and values ​​that improve lives. The company is currently focusing its efforts on innovative consumer products, product manufacturing and agricultural technology in a controlled environment. The NSE family of companies includes Nu Skin, which develops and distributes a full line of premium beauty and wellness solutions through a global network of sales leaders in Asia, the Americas, Europe, Africa and The pacific ; and Rhyz, our strategic investment arm that includes a collection of sustainable manufacturing and technology innovation companies. Nu Skin Enterprises is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “NUS”. More information is available at nuskinenterprises.com.

SOURCE Nu Skin Enterprises

Related links

http://www.nuskinenterprises.com/

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Salt lake city government

This week’s winners and losers in Utah politics


Hello Utah and TGIF!

Thanks for reading “The Rundown”.

Do you have a tip? Some interesting political gossip? Do you just want to discuss politics? Email me or find me on Twitter @SchottHappens.

Receive this newsletter in your inbox every morning of the week. Sign up for free here.

This Week’s Winners and Losers in Utah Politics

⬆️ Winner: The Utah State School Board. Board members have been battered by the current panic over critical breed theory. Republicans in the Legislature are eager to get involved in the issue. But the board has apparently taken enough action this year against classroom race that lawmakers say they don’t see the need to do anything just yet. But, this respite will be short-lived because there could be several laws next year on the subject.

⬇️ Loser: Representative Chris Stewart. In a controversial interview with CNN’s Chris Cuomo, Chris Stewart falsely claimed he voted to remove Georgian Republican Marjorie Taylor Greene from her committee assignments in February. This claim was not true. The next day, Cuomo and Don Lemon toasted Stewart for not reaching out to correct the record. It wasn’t Stewart’s best hour.

⬇️ Loser: Utah taxpayers. One year ago, the New Yorker reported big issues with TestUtah, the effort to use technology to improve approach to the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, the Salt Lake Tribune reports that the SEC was investigating the co-diagnosis, which provided testing for the effort. In the end, Utah taxpayers spent $ 15 million on testing through TestUtah, far more than any other vendor paid.

Here’s what you need to know for Friday morning

Local News

  • Gov. Spencer Cox expressed frustration Thursday because so many Utahns refuse to be vaccinated against COVID-19, which has resulted in more preventable deaths. Since the vaccines were made available to all Utahns 16 and older, nearly all of the COVID cases in the state have been unvaccinated. [Tribune]

  • Governor Cox explained that he could not ban fireworks in the state despite the extreme fire danger, because it was outside the powers of his governor. The legislature could take such a step, but there doesn’t appear to be the political will to do so, Cox said. [Tribune]

  • Some aligned with the #DezNat group, an online effort to defend the doctrines and practices of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, are deleting their social media accounts for fear they will be identified publicly. [Tribune]

  • Utah County has managed to cut chronic homelessness in half over the past three years. [Tribune]

  • Some owners in Utah require potential renters to pay for DNA testing of their pets. The tests will help them identify who is not cleaning up after their dog or cat when they poop outside. [Tribune]

  • An investment group is turning to technology as a way to help conserve water. [Tribune]

National News

  • A great day at the Supreme Court. The judges rejected another challenge to the Affordable Care Act. [Scotusblog]

  • The court also sided with a faith-based organization, ruling that Philadelphia violated the group’s First Amendment rights when the city stopped working with them when they refused to certify same-sex couples as as potential adoptive parents. [Scotusblog]

  • Both rulings highlighted growing cracks within the court’s conservative wing. [Politico]

  • Unemployment claims jumped unexpectedly last week after several weeks of falling numbers. [WSJ]

  • President Joe Biden signed a bill designating Juneteenth as a federal holiday. [NYT]

  • Schools in the Washington, DC area are closed today for the new June vacation. The last-minute shutdown is pushing parents apart. [WaPo]

  • Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell pledges to block voting rights legislation as it relates to the Senate. [WaPo]

  • The sizzling US economy is driving inflation globally, forcing foreign banks to raise rates in response. [WSJ]

  • The Biden administration will invest $ 3 million to develop antiviral treatments for COVID-19. [CNN]

  • The U.S. Department of Education is forgiving more than $ 500 million in student debt for 18,000 former students of the ITT Technical Institute, which closed in 2016. [AP]

  • 13 Republican members of Congress signed a letter demanding that President Biden undergo a cognitive aptitude test. The group is led by Florida Republican Ronny Jackson, former President Donald Trump’s White House doctor. [MyHighPlains.com]

Utah Politics Podcast

In this week’s episode, we let you listen to a conversation between Rep. Blake Moore and the Salt Lake Tribune Editorial Board.

It’s a fascinating peek behind the curtain as board members engage in a freewheeling chat with Moore that touches public lands, Hill Air Force Base, and investigates the attack on the January 6 against the US Capitol.

You can listen and subscribe for free.

Friday’s Utah News Summary

Utah

  • The United States Court of Appeals rules against citizenship for nationals of American Samoa. [Tribune]

  • The University of Utah, BYU is rolling out name, image and likeness plans as NCAA legislation looms. [Tribune]

  • Deseret Management Corp. appoints director of strategic initiatives and new president of Deseret Digital Media. [DNews]

  • Cox issues a proclamation commemorating June 19 as Juneteenth in Utah. [FOX13]

  • Equality Utah welcomes the Supreme Court ruling that balances religious beliefs with equal protection. [FOX13]

  • 41% of Utah CHIP beneficiaries lost their coverage in May due to a government overthrow. [KSL]

  • BYU-Hawaii will require COVID vaccinations; BYU strongly encourages. [Daily Herald]

COVID-19[feminine

Environnement

  • Le ministère de l’Agriculture a une surveillance faible, des « problèmes de contrôle », constate l’audit. [KSL]

Local government

  • Sunset skid keeps city council optimistic out of poll; the city recorder reprimanded. [Standard Examiner]

  • Former transportation manager selected to fill vacant position on Spanish Fork City Council. [Daily Herald]

  • The still difficult PCMR talks may be coming to a conclusion. [Park Record]

  • Dozens of Utah election officials are participating in the new VOTE certification program. [ABC4]

Infrastructure

  • Experts say Utah is unprepared for large-scale power outages. [KUTV]

  • Boil order issued to Mapleton after bacteria was found in a water source. [FOX13]

  • St. George issues the first energy saving alert. [FOX13]

Housing

  • Can’t keep track of all those new apartments in or coming to Salt Lake County? This card will help you. [Tribune]

  • End of the moratorium on evictions: who to turn to if you run out of rent. [KSL]

  • Ogden City Council is considering an ordinance to ease restrictions on non-residential housing. [Standard Examiner]

On opinion pages

  • Robert Gehrke: Ban fireworks in times of drought and destroy the Utahns that light them. [Tribune]

  • Scott Williams: The governors of Utah have a 50-year legacy of opposing radioactive waste. [Tribune]

  • Tribune Editorial Board: Just get the Utah landmarks back to where they were and get to work. [Tribune]

  • David R. Irvine: We’re not the America we think we are anymore. [Tribune]

  • Richard D. Burbidge: It’s up to you what kind of guinea pig you will be. [Tribune]

  • Steven Collis: Stop asking the Supreme Court to resolve the LGBTQ religious conflict. [Tribune]

🎂 You say it’s your birthday? !!

Happy birthday to Tiffany Gunnerson, spokesperson for the Purposeful Planning Institute, Joel Campbell, associate professor of journalism at BYU, and Eric Peterson, founder of the Utah Investigative Journalism Project.

On Saturday, Thom Carter, energy advisor and executive director of the Office of Energy Development, celebrates.

State Senator Jerry Stevenson and former State Senator Steve Urquhart mark another year on Sunday.

Do you have a birthday that you would like us to recognize in this space? Send us an e-mail.

– Tribune reporter Connor Sanders contributed to this report.



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Salt lakes real estate

Earthquake reported in western Indiana


Did you feel a slight rumbling today? You may have felt the earthquake that hit western Indiana just north of Terre Haute.

According to the Evansville / Vanderburgh County Emergency Management Agency, the earthquake was small in magnitude, only about 3.8. If you feel it as far south as the tri-state they ask you to report it, you can do that by clicking here. The Indiana Department of Homeland Security also spoke about the quake, saying it started in Montezuma, Indiana, just north of Terre Haute. They say they can’t rule out aftershocks, so just something to be aware of.

Guess, being from the Midwest, I don’t know much about earthquakes because we don’t have them here often. So I don’t even know what to do if you feel an earthquake. I decided it was best to be prepared just in case, so I did some research on Google. Ready.gov says if you feel an earthquake the best thing to remember is to drop, cover, and hang on.

Fall:

Wherever you are, get on all fours and hold onto something solid. If you are using a wheelchair or walker with a seat, make sure your wheels are locked and stay seated until the shaking stops.

Blanket:

Cover your head and neck with your arms. If a sturdy table or desk is nearby, crawl under it for shelter. If no shelter is nearby, crawl next to an interior wall (away from windows). Crawl only if you can achieve better coverage without going through an area with more debris. Stay on your knees or bend down to protect vital organs.

Wait:

If you are under a table or desk, hold on with one hand and be ready to move with it if it does. If you are seated and unable to fall to the ground, lean forward, cover your head with your arms, and hold your neck with both hands.

They also recommend preparing before an earthquake even strikes. Some ways to prepare is to make sure heavy items like televisions and bookcases are attached to the wall. These are just a few ways to prepare, you can find other ways to prepare for an earthquake through Ready.Gov by clicking here.

WATCH: This is the richest city in every state

Just saying the names of these towns immediately conjures up images of grand mansions, fancy cars, and fancy restaurants. Read on to see which city in your home state received the title of richest location and which place had the highest median income in the country. Who knows, your hometown might even be on this list.

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The 100 Best Places to Live in the Midwest


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Salt lakes real estate

Cool and totally wacky gifts that dads will receive for Father’s Day


If you want to buy Dad something different for Father’s Day, we’ve got a list for you! The SimplyCodes.com website reviewed the Father’s Day gifts people are looking for this year and came up with one that each state buys more than other states.

A few states seem to be looking for more traditional daddy stuff: in Alabama it’s all about fishing gear, in Arkansas, they want dad to smell like cologne. Here in Massachusetts, not just a six pack but gift boxes of beer (we like to get it right!). Also in Vermont, everything revolves around the wax seal for dads who write letters.

Heading to Michigan you have to customize a dad’s coffee mugs and t-shirts, in Oklahoma dads put it on everything hot sauce and West Virginia Birkenstocks. And of course, for a complete daddy look, don’t forget the white socks to accompany these Birkenstocks

Here’s the fun part of daddy’s day when you buy him something, should I say unique? or less traditional daddy gifts: Hawaii your dad will juice his way with cold juicers, New York hopefully your dad has a green thumb because people are looking for plants and New- Mexico, “rustic and manly jewelry.”

And we go beyond the limits, here are some of the weirder things we buy Connecticut dads get shorts with built-in underwear WEEEE! in Idaho, pillows that look like sports shirts, Kansas wants to give dad, in quotes, a “pill for unlimited intelligence” (I scratch my head on that one.)

In Maryland, George Washington, Tennessee memorabilia want stuff from the Cracker Barrel store in Texas, luxury toothpicks (???) Virginia is looking for laser-etched beef jerky.

What are the signature drinks of each state?

See the must-see routes in each state

KEEP READING: Discover The Richest Person In Each State

WATCH: Famous historic homes in every state

WATCH: Here are the best small towns to live across America

CHECK IT OUT: See America’s 100 Most Popular Brands


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Utah economy

Venmo Touch will help Chicago’s Braintree mobile transactions surpass $ 2 billion annually – TechCrunch

Venmo Touch will help Chicago’s Braintree mobile transactions surpass $ 2 billion annually – TechCrunch

Brain, a payment gateway backed by Accel Partners and NEA, appears to have effectively doubled the volume of mobile transactions it sees per year to $ 2 billion. He now boasts 40 million credit card accounts in his safe.

How does this compare to the competition? eBay, which operates Paypal, said he had 123 million registered accounts in his last earnings filing and that it expects to generate around $ 20 billion in mobile commerce and payments volume. So while Braintree is even smaller, it’s one of the few notable emerging companies in the space. The Combinator’s Stripe is the other with its formidable concentration of technical talent.

Braintree made waves last year when it bought Venmo, a New York-based mobile payment startup that has made it easy and frictionless to transfer money via SMS and email.

The company kept the Venmo brand name when it launched a series of products including Venmo Touch, making it easy for consumers to store their payment information on a network of Braintree-supported apps like Hotel Tonight, Airbnb, and Uber. The idea is to reduce friction when entering credit card information, so that customers don’t give up on potential purchases.

Instead of having to re-enter your credit card information every time you sign up for a new Braintree-supported mobile service, Venmo Touch will automatically remember your payment details with just one click. Venmo Touch was in beta, but it’s now fully released and available to all Braintree merchants.

On top of that, they’re releasing a new iOS SDK, which will make it easier for developers to create a native checkout flow with UI images and text suggestions. It has a payment form, which already has a lot of credit card entry UI elements and other features that help detect typos. They will bring both Venmo Touch and an improved SDK to Android in the near future.

Brain has raised $ 69 million in venture capital to date from New Enterprise Associates, Accel Partners, RRE Ventures and Greycroft Partners. Find out venmo limit here.

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Utah economy

Could Plaid be the next big IPO of 2021?

It has been a little over a year since Visa announced plans to acquire Plaid for $ 5.3 billion. Visa saw the fintech‘s in addition to its existing product line. He also liked how widely Plaid is used and how the company bridges the gap between financial institutions and financial application services.

However, those plans were halted in November when the Justice Department sued Visa to block the deal, citing antitrust concerns. Visa and Plaid canceled the acquisition in January, citing how long it would take to fight the lawsuit.

And just like that, Plaid found himself where he was before last year – all on his own, and considering his options.

I find this company intriguing, and the fallout from its deal with Visa makes me wonder: Could Plaid be the next big fintech to go public in 2021?

Image source: Getty Images.

Connect financial applications and banks

Plaid provides technology that allows customers to connect their bank accounts to apps. When you sign up for Venmo, Square, or Chime, for example, you can connect the app to your bank account just by logging in. The company has effectively created a bridge between consumer financial applications and more than 11,000 banking institutions, making these applications easier to use than ever.

The company earns money on the fees it charges applications that use its service. So if you connect your Square account to your bank account and transfer money, Square pays a fee to Plaid to facilitate the transaction.

What I find most intriguing about Plaid is the sheer number of its partners and the fact that many of them are huge names in fintech. It works with Robinhood, Square, Coinbase, Live Oak Bancshares, and Carvana, Just to name a few. These partnerships place Plaid in a privileged position for growth. As many of these big names go public and continue to grow, Plaid is expected to grow alongside them. In fact, Plaid’s last round of funding rated it three times higher than its rating just a year ago.

Caught in regulatory crosswinds

In January 2020, Visa and Plaid reached a deal valued at $ 5.3 billion. However, the US Department of Justice has Visa more and more scrutinized, claiming that its practices violate antitrust laws. The Justice Department alleged that Visa would block competition by acquiring Plaid, which the Department said was creating its own payments network that competed with Visa.

Visa and Plaid mutually agreed to drop the deal in January. For Plaid, that meant another fundraiser. Sources said recently Barron that Plaid was about to complete a fundraiser in the amount of $ 500-600 million. That would value the company at close to $ 10 billion to $ 15 billion.

The chances of a public offering in the near future are lower

With this funding soon secured, it seems less likely that Plaid will be made public in the near future. Some believed he was exploring a plan to go public via PSPC in January, but those rumors have cooled. A source said Barron that the company would not sell to a SAVS, and that “with $ 600 million, [Plaid] can be independent for a long time. “

The company doesn’t let the blocked acquisition deal deter it. In fact, the pandemic has done wonders for fintech as consumers increased their use of financial apps. John Pitts, policy manager at Plaid, said that “the number of consumer adoptions of fintech that we have seen during the pandemic is considerably higher than anything we have seen in the past five years. ‘previous existence’.

The company is optimistic about its future. Last May, he launched Plaid Exchange, a product that aims to help small financial institutions keep pace with the big players, in part by moving them away from models of credential sharing, thereby increasing privacy and privacy. transparency for consumers.

Not much is known about Plaid’s finances. Forbes reported that according to some estimates, the company’s revenue in 2019 was around $ 100-200 million. Considering the growing use of financial apps during the pandemic and the subsequent expansion of Plaid’s valuation, it’s safe to say that its sales are now much higher. While Plaid may not have plans to go public soon, I will be watching it closely.

This article represents the opinion of the author, who may disagree with the “official” recommendation position of a premium Motley Fool consulting service. We are heterogeneous! Challenging an investment thesis – even one of our own – helps us all to think critically about investing and make decisions that help us become smarter, happier, and richer.

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Utah economy

Lavrov: US does not want to abandon the “imperfect path” to world domination

World

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MOSCOW (Sputnik) – The United States persists in its desire to continue its world domination, but it is absolutely counterproductive in the multipolar world, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov told the IRNA news agency.

“The main problem, in our view, is Washington’s continued reluctance to abandon its imperfect path to maintain US world domination, which was adopted in the early 1990s after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Today it is evident to everyone that such a policy is totally counterproductive, especially as the objective process of forming a fairer, more democratic and therefore more sustainable multipolar world order is taking hold. ‘magnitude before our eyes,’ Lavrov said in an interview ahead of his visit to Iran.

Despite this, the United States, supported by its European allies, “has taken aggressive steps aimed at destroying the UN-centric international legal architecture and replacing it with what is called” the order-based on the United Nations. rules ”, he continued.

Russia, the minister noted, does not object to the idea of ​​everyone following rules.

“[Y]And these rules should not be developed in a narrow circle including Washington and its satellites and bypassing the United Nations, but in universal formats involving all major global players on the basis of universally recognized standards of international law, ”he said. He underlines.

Russia is actively working to switch to national currencies in trade

Russia is actively working with its trading partners to to abandon West-controlled payment systems, Lavrov also told IRNA news agency.

“It is equally important to redouble our efforts to reduce the risks associated with [US] punishments [on Iran] and the potential expenses for economic operators. In particular, progressive steps should be taken to move towards de-dollarization of national economies and the transition to payments in national or alternative currencies, as well as to stop using international payment systems controlled by the West. Russia has been actively working towards this end, ”Lavrov said in an interview ahead of his visit to Iran.

“We see great prospects for cooperation in this area with all interested international partners,” added the senior Russian diplomat.

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Utah economy

Rising Sea Levels Of The Islands Of Sicily – Once A Large Landmass?

The islands of Sicily were initially a landmass, according to a recent study published in the journal Scientists progress – which shows how, when sea levels rise, human populations generally adapt to changes rather than just abandon them, as common sense might suggest.

RELATED: WHAT 2019 TAKEN US ABOUT THE CLIMATE CRISIS

The islands of Sicily were once a single landmass before rising sea levels divided it

Average sea level is rising by about 0.14 inch / year (3.6 mm / year) – a rate of rise unprecedented in millennia, according to the study. But the distribution of this increase in volume is not the same around the world. This means that some areas will experience higher than average sea level rise, making them particularly vulnerable to the risk of submersion.

The climate crisis combined with continued sea level rise will mean that global flood outliers will be extreme, as some regions inevitably experience worse weather conditions than others.

Although projected sea level changes at global and regional levels become increasingly limited, no one can fully predict how cultural and behavioral norms might change. The future risks of coastal flooding to human populations – combined with projected migration patterns are generally based on environmental thresholds – those lacking a defined limit of adaptation based on the culture and perception of risk in human societies.

The climate crisis could lead to technological progress

During prehistoric sea level rise, catastrophic flooding is associated with a migration on a massive scale – but this common sense perception of natural disaster and societal response is oversimplified, according to the study’s authors.

In modern society, the possibility of catastrophic sea level rise will be more complex, involving interactions between climatic factors, subsequent changes in the local environment, and how humans ultimately respond. In the new study, the researchers focused on past changes and human responses that occurred amid the submersion of populated coasts as sea levels rose.

Over the past 11,700 years (also known as the Holocene), cultural transitions have generally spread across entire societies with substantial technological advancements. But these transitions are usually accompanied (and perhaps linked) with climate and environmental changes, including sea level rise, the study notes.

Rising sea levels pose many dangers to society

The rate of global sea level rise during the early Holocene was at or above current rates – and overlaps with the shift from Mesolithic hunter-gatherers to the agricultural way of life of the Neolithic time. This is due to the rapid disintegration of ice caps in Scandinavia and North America.

The subsequent migration of coastal communities amid rising sea levels may have created a need for society to move to a Neolithic standard across Europe. Additionally, rising sea levels may have offered new opportunities for humans to migrate across northwestern Europe via expanding sea lanes.

However, sea level rise is a double-edged sword. While there are benefits and incentives for technological advancement, many threats arise – including coastal erosion, habitat endangerment, land loss, flooding, and land loss. crucial resources – endanger coastal society.

Humans generally adapt rather than flee the effects of rising sea levels

Taken together, these threats make island communities particularly vulnerable to the effects of the climate crisis – due to the scale of the changes taking place in an isolated location.

Scientists in the recent study combined pollen and char data from 17 sediment cores using optically stimulated luminescence and radiocarbon – in addition to population dynamics collected and inferred from regional archeology. Overall, they showed how the prehistoric populations of the region of Sicily (especially during the Bronze Age) adapted – rather than abandoned – to new island distributions in the middle of a period of gradual rise in sea level and major cultural changes.

So while we trade climate crisis memes of Brooklyn and San Francisco sinking into the sea with apocalyptic undertones – this latest study shows how, despite the substantial chaos and danger of sea level changes, human populations are more likely to adapt than to simply running away from a region – a storyline reconstructed in a brilliant piece of speculative fiction titled “New York 2140” by author Kim Stanley Robinson – in which Manhattan has turned into a Venice-like sci-fi metropolis, with new impressive vehicles and technologies.

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Utah economy

Protesters target PayPal after founder backs Trump

It is now well documented that this election harms Donald Trump’s luxury brand, with charities to abandon its properties and new flagship hotel in Washington DC would have desperate for paying customers. Now the damage appears to extend beyond Trump’s name. It is also starting to stick to its supporters.

Recently, Peter Thiel, the internet billionaire who made his fortune by founding PayPal and investing in companies like Facebook, donate $ 1.25 million to the Trump campaign. His outspoken support for the deeply polarizing Republican candidate is rare among the generally young Silicon Valley ensemble, and the news of Thiel’s donation sparked a rapid reaction online, including numerous calls for consumers to boycott PayPal, in especially on social networks.

Spreading on Twitter, in particular, the hashtag #boycottpaypal quickly gained traction. The posts range from sarcastic memes-focused posts …

… to screenshots of the PayPal account cancellation confirmation:

For some, it’s as simple as a message saying “I just closed my PayPal”.

The catch is that Thiel no longer owns PayPal.

While Thiel co-founded the online payment company in 1998, he sold the company to eBay in 2002 for $ 1.5 billion. Last year PayPal officially split from eBay become his own business again… but always without Thiel’s involvement or investment.

For many protesters, current ownership is irrelevant. Thiel’s story as the founder of the company is enough to taint it with a brand they consider toxic. The backlash intensified enough, in fact, that some posters for #boycottpaypal began to target Venmo as well, an electronic payment service owned by PayPal.

Beyond the Twitterverse, Thiel’s colleagues in Silicon Valley have also responded to his decision to support Trump publicly and financially. In an article on Medium, Ellen Pao, former CEO of Reddit, ad that its Project Include will separate from Y Combinator, a business incubator that Thiel advises.

Pao wrote, in part:

“We are struggling to rationalize the power and influence of Peter Thiel as he travels further and further there… But we are completely outraged to read that Thiel has donated $ 1.25 million to Trump, apparently unfazed by the storm surrounding the candidate last week after obscene conversations aired. “

The backlash became intense enough to request the resignation of Y Combinator chairman Sam Altman for keeping the company away from Thiel.

A similar try boycott the Home Depot megastore, after founder Bernard Marcus endorsed Trump, failed to take root earlier this month, but was revived by PayPal’s boycott efforts.

Others have pointed out that while Thiel may no longer own PayPal, he currently sits on Facebook’s board and owns around $ 40 million in shares.

“Ironically,” writtenThe Huffington Post, “Peter Thiel owns a stake in several companies, including Facebook, one of the social media behind the boycott calls… Interestingly, there was no call to boycott Facebook.”

This is not PayPal’s first exposure to political controversy or boycott calls; however, in past news cycles it has drawn anger primarily from the right. Earlier this year, the company announced plans to cancel an expansion in North Carolina due to the state’s discriminatory treatment of LGBT citizens. In a public statement at the time, the company wrote this:

“[L]Legislation was abruptly enacted by the state of North Carolina that invalidates the rights protections of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender citizens and denies these members of our community equal rights under the law. The new law perpetuates discrimination and violates the values ​​and principles that are at the heart of PayPal’s mission and culture. “

In response, conservative outlets such as Breitbart have articles with tips for launching boycotts, including advice on electronic payment alternatives for those who are angry with PayPal’s support for the LGBT community and its related decision to cancel a planned expansion.

Yet other conservatives have called for boycotts on PayPal’s refusal to process transactions involving firearms of any kind.

While Thiel will likely remain a deeply controversial figure, including not only his support for the Trump campaign but also his role in Gawker’s bankruptcy through litigation, severing ties with him is likely a difficult task for the average consumer. As recent Fast businessitem As pointed out, the Silicon Valley investor touched or owned elements of a huge number of now mainstream technology products and services, including:

  • Facebook
  • Airbnb
  • Spotify
  • Lyft
  • Twitter
  • NPR
  • And, in a way, the fbi

However, PayPal remains Thiel’s flagship creation, despite the years that have passed since its involvement. For now, this is where the demonstrators have decided to release their rage.

Do these boycotts even work?

Boycotts have long been a preferred way for consumers to protest against a company’s social or political decisions. From divestment moves across college campuses to Chik-Fil-A’s stalemate with social liberals, fear of lost sales is one of the main reasons many companies are trying to avoid controversy. .

This strategy can be very effective when it comes to forcing a business to change behavior, but the watchword is organized. As Professor Maurice Schweitzer of the Wharton School of Business explained, for a boycott to make a difference it has to have the kind of grip power that social media isn’t often known for.

“For boycotts to be effective, they must be supported,” Schweitzer said. “They need coordinated leadership and they need to have significant economic consequences, and the vast majority of cases never reach that.”

PayPal isn’t the first company in recent years to face organized resistance over social or political issues (indeed, as noted earlier in this article, it’s not even the first time this year that PayPal itself is the target of a boycott attempt). Other companies have included BP in the aftermath of its 2010 oil spill, Kentucky Fried Chicken on the treatment of animals, the 2003 rally to boycott French wines, and many more.

“The list goes on,” said Schweitzer. “There are a lot of boycotts and they tend not to be very effective. The few exceptions are where there has been a substantial and coordinated sustained movement, and I am quite sure that the PayPal boycott movement won’t be one of them. “

“Particularly,” he added, “because Thiel is no longer with PayPal.”

Part of the reason boycotts struggle is that they demand a lot of grassroots protesters. A successful boycott requires that a large number of consumers change their established habits, abandoning or suspending the brand loyalty often accumulated over the years and because a given product is the cheapest or most convenient option.

For a brief period, buyers may be willing to incur additional expense, but once the news gets over that initial outburst of anger often dies down … and with it the incentive to continue a boycott.

“Boycotting PayPal because of its connection to Thiel does not appear to be a textbook case of a successful boycott,” said Gregory Egorov, professor at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Business. “Typically, about half of organized boycotts are successful. Organization means resources and perseverance; there has to be a group – say, activists – that takes responsibility for raising awareness, [and] tell customers how to boycott. ”

“The reason they fail,” he added, “is either the inability to organize properly or the company’s determination to rebuild its reputation for being tough. This makes a lot of sense to high-level companies who know that otherwise they would always be a target of any self-respecting activist. “

While the sustainability of a Twitter campaign is a serious question, there is a more important reason why a PayPal boycott is unlikely to be successful: Boycotts depend on their ability to influence the results of a PayPal campaign. business, and that’s very difficult in a market where PayPal is the dominant force.

Although modern businesses are often very protective of their image, history shows that few boycotts succeed solely through damage to public relations. See, for example, the annual plight of Starbucks, which faces enormous pressure from the American right-wing to adopt a more explicit celebration of Christmas. While the issue could hardly be more widely publicized each December, it has little impact on company policy.

“Companies rarely notice it unless there is an impact on earnings or the share price, which is a signal for future earnings,” Egorov said. “Rarely does negative publicity in itself cause a company to change its behavior. “

In this case, while the PayPal boycott has garnered considerable media attention, it also remains focused on a small handful of users. Other consumers, even if they sympathize with the token cause, would likely be reluctant to cancel their PayPal accounts due to concerns about other options.

There aren’t that many.

According to an analysis, PayPal has an approximate value 80% digital payment market share.

With 184 million users and 14 million participating merchants, there are few viable alternatives to PayPal in today’s market.

It would be potentially impossible for consumers to find an alternative to PayPal without sacrificing ease of use and convenience.

For a boycott without articulated demands, and therefore without real
end date, it would be difficult to convince many consumers to ditch one of the few widely accepted electronic payment platforms.

“Paypal is a platform that has few good substitutes for such transactions,” Egorov said, “if at all. Social media activity would therefore likely come from a few dozen, maybe hundreds, of outraged individuals who are not particularly profitable for PayPal either. Unless there is a group of activists who are taking this matter up and trying to clarify the claims, then they may have some success. “

However, for now, in the absence of an organization, articulable goals, or a meaningful alternative, chances are the PayPal boycott is little more than a chance for consumers to express. their anger on social media.

After all, as Schweitzer noted, the protesters gathered more than 20,000
signatures on a boycott of BP gas stations after its oil spill in the Gulf. Today, their gas stations remain open and are doing very well.

“We have habits,” he said. “On the whole, most people try to get on with their lives. For people to change the way they shop in the long term, the way they refuel, it is difficult.”

“Like dieting, we can do it for a little while, but we have to be motivated enough to maintain sustained change,” he added.

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