close

June 2021

Salt lake city

5 local options for your Seltzer summer – SLUG Magazine


As the summer heats up and our evenings lengthen, we seek a refreshing comfort that will refresh us as we navigate a post-pandemic world. Many have made connections with seltzer such as White Claw and Press during their rise in popularity over the past two years, but there is also a healthy pool of locally made seltzer to choose from – local breweries. Epic, Nuances, Uinta, Squatters and Grid city can provide fodder for your scorching seltzer summer. With flavors such as Cherry Lime, Pineapple & Mint, Raspberry, Peach and a fruity Rosé, your sparkling summer companions are plentiful.


Photo: @ slc-bites

Epic Brewing Company
Pakkā Cherry Lime

In the refreshing world of hard seltzer, Epic‘s Pakkā the offerings are particularly crisp and fresh. The flavors here – our choice was Cherry Lime – are found on the reserved end, more a subtle increase in carbonated sparkle than an explosive intestinal punch. Straight out of the fridge, the lime flavor dominated the first sip. As the seltzer water quickly approached room temperature, as is often the case during a Utah summer, especially when drinking outdoors, the citrus bite mellowed and the richer cherry flavor came to the fore for a pleasantly sweet finish. Epic‘s Pakkā Selts are a safe bet if you really, really want to convince yourself that you are * not * drinking alcohol while you tidy up a dozen bakers by the pool. –AL

pakkāhard.com

Bubble Works Rose by Grid City Beer Works
Photo: @ slc-bites

Grid City Beer Works
Bubble Works Rosé Hard Seltzer

Grid City Beer WorksThe Bubble Works collection is home to a biting troupe of four hard seltts, including the Aperitif, Cucumber Lime, Hoppy Hard and Rosé. While super hot at 8.2% blood alcohol content, this rosé seltzer is the perfect sipping experience to cool off in the sun. Pouring this portion was electric, as the light carbonation projected sparkling bubbles from the top of my mug above the ruby ​​red body of the rosé. The first sip introduces a refreshing, traditional taste of Rosé with a crisp landing on my tongue. Not as sweet as initially expected, the juices of dried raspberry, freeze-dried tangy cherry, prickly pear, and muscat canelli showed up – in that order – as the drink settled down to a warmer temperature. Be warned: at this particular ABV, this little number might be a little TOO easy to drink. Everything will be fine, won’t it? –BV

gridcitybeerworks.com

Livli Pineapple Mint Seltzer, Shades Brewing
Photo: @ slc-bites

Stirring nuances
Livli Pineapple & Mint

Among the local seltzers we sampled, Nuances‘The Livli brand has one of the biggest personalities – a hard seltzer for connoisseurs of flavor. Following Nuances‘penchant for brewing experimentation – their favorite sour Pina Colada, their “Slurry” beer concoctions – the fruit and herbal blend of pineapple and seltzer mint strives to be unique at first. Interestingly enough, the individual notes of pineapple and mint didn’t really speak up during my tasting. Instead, the combination of the two resulted in a creamy fruit flavor not unlike that of classic summer Creamsicles. While the rich flavors and textures of this seltzer make it an unlikely candidate for multiple-can consumption, the Livli’s sturdy body offers a valid choice if your desires incline to sit back and ‘cure one for the flavor’. –AL
shadesbrewing.beer

Grandeur Peak Peach Sparkling Water, Squatters Brewing Co.
Photo: @ slc-bites

Squatters Brewing Co.
Grandeur Peak Peach Sparkling Water

Call me Princess Peach, cause this Grandeur Peak Sparkling peach water made me feel like royalty saved from the grip of danger! If anything could deconstruct a peach and rebuild it into a light, watered version of itself, it’s squatters’ Peak of Grandeur. The fuzzy sensation that greets your mouth from the first sip comfortably rolls out the red carpet for the star of the show, the nicely rounded peach flavor. Crunchy, fruity and almost creamy, this low carbon and very refreshing sparkling drink offers a lighter option than Wild basin‘s Cucumber Peach, without the consequent bloating and lingering malt liquor taste of seltzer water. Arriving at a safe 4.5% ABV, you can easily push a few off before you need to be put in a
turn for a little princess break. –BV

squatters.com

Raspberry Westwater, Uinta Brewing
Photo: @ slc-bites

Uinta Brewery
Westwater Raspberry

Uinta Brewery‘s Westwater Seltzer range does not achieve the same eye-catching novelty as other local brands; instead, the brewery strives to perfect the basics and offers the tried and true trio of lime, mango and raspberry. That said, our raspberry flavor taste test found that simplicity doesn’t equate to blandness. Of the group, Westwater Raspberry has some of the most naturalistic tasting notes, eschewing candy-like artificiality and leaning into the true taste of a fruity drink. While some traditional seltzers lean so crispy they border on tonic and some come across more as high falutin concoctions, Westwater falls in that golden mean – far from bland, but even further from to be an exercise at a sip of experimental perfection. She’s the resident cutie who doesn’t bite but can still give you a great time. –AL

uintabrewing.com


Source link

read more
Utah economy

Beehive Archive — Pleasure Cruising: The Galloway-Stone Expedition

In September 1909, Julius Stone, an Ohio financier, hired Utah adventurer Nathaniel Galloway to take him on a boat trip on the Green and Colorado rivers. It was a time when navigating the rugged and isolated canyons of western rivers was an arduous necessity for scientists and geographers. But Stone and Galloway’s river voyage was the first for the sheer pleasure of boating, and signaled an emerging interest in the idea of ​​discovering remote landscapes just for the fun of it.

Inspired by John Wesley Powell’s travels on these same rivers, Stone was passionate about the wild outdoors. Galloway was a prospector and trapper from Vernal, Utah, known for his experience on the Yampa and Green rivers. Galloway guided the journey and Stone funded it, including building boats built to Galloway’s new design. These flat-bottomed boats were facing forward, so the rower had better control of the vessel and could see – and maneuver through – potential obstacles. Previous boat designs had rowers rowing the backs downstream, resulting in frequent flips.

Galloway, Stone, and a small group of men set off on four boats from Green River, Wyoming. Although the trip was made for fun, it was not without hardships. The men were relatively inexperienced and had to carry their boats and cargo around unmanageable rapids. Only Galloway sailed efficiently through the rough waters, rowing in the current rather than trying to overpower it. Yet the men marveled at their awe-inspiring surroundings and devoted themselves to enjoying the beauty and magnificence of the river. Crossing canyons, catching fish, and exploring distant landscapes left a lasting impression on the group.

The Galloway-Stone expedition ended five weeks later in Needles, California. Pleasure travel foreshadowed the popularity that river racing would enjoy in the 20th century and the impact it would have on the Utah economy. Tourists paid to appreciate the natural beauty of rivers. By the late 1920s, shopping tours were organized from Vernal – and Galloway’s boat design was the preferred choice of river guides until the 1950s.

The Beehive Archive is a project of Utah Humanities, produced in partnership with Utah Public Radio and KCPW Radio with funding from the Lawrence T. and Janet T. Dee Foundation. Find sources and past episodes on Utah Stories from the Beehive Archives.

read more
Salt lake city government

Owens slams Olympic athlete for protesting flag

Good Wednesday morning Utah! Thanks for reading “The Rundown”.

I want to hear from you! Let me know how to make this newsletter more useful. Email me or find me on Twitter @SchottHappens.

Get this newsletter delivered to your inbox every morning of the week. Sign up for free here.

Owens criticizes Olympic athlete for turning away from American flag

Representative Burgess Owens tore hammer thrower Gwen Berry, who turned away from the American flag during the national anthem during the track and field trials in the United States over the weekend, accusing her of trying to return “His small community of other happy leftists” while disrespecting America.

“She’s going to be a footnote,” Owens said during an appearance on Newsmax. “The only reason to go to the Olympics is to wear red, white and blue and represent your country.”

“If you are ashamed of America, don’t represent America on the international stage,” Owens added.

Berry says playing the national anthem was a “setup.” She claims organizers told her they would play “The Star-Spangled Banner” before she stepped onto the podium with the other qualifiers. Berry turned away from the flag and draped a t-shirt that read “Activist Athlete” over his head as the anthem played.

“The anthem does not speak for me. It never was. Berry told the AP.

Berry, who competed in the 2016 Olympics in Brazil, was sanctioned by the U.S. Olympic Committee after throwing her fist on the podium after winning the hammer throw at the 2019 Pan Am Games. The committee has since apologized to Berry.

Here’s what you need to know for Wednesday

Local News

  • Utah’s coffers are overflowing as state tax revenues exceed forecasts by billions of dollars. This usually means that officials will look to cut taxes, but that might not happen. [Tribune]

  • Utah Representatives Burgess Owens and John Curtis voted against a bill to remove Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol, while Representatives Blake Moore and Chris Stewart voted in favor of the measure. The bill was adopted by 285-120 votes. [WSJ]

  • The Dixie State University Board of Trustees has decided not to change the school’s name to Utah Polytechnic State University. Instead, they recommended Utah Tech University. [Tribune]

  • Second Gentleman Doug Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, will travel to southern Utah this week. [Tribune]

  • Governor Spencer Cox has appointed Marlo M. Oaks as the next state treasurer, replacing David Damschen, who resigned earlier this year. [Tribune]

  • Heavy rains cause flash floods in southern Utah. [Tribune]

National News

  • The Supreme Court rejected a request to lift the national moratorium on evictions due to the pandemic on a restricted vote. [WSJ]

  • Gasoline prices hit a 7-year high due to shortages ahead of the July 4th weekend. [ABC News]

  • The New York mayoral race was plunged into chaos when election officials mistakenly included test results in the latest vote count update. [Politico]

  • Arizona Representative Paul Gosar denied attending a fundraising event with a white nationalist group despite an online invitation promoting their presence. [WaPo]

  • South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem sends 50 National Guard soldiers to the US border with Mexico. A private donation pays for the deployment of a GOP megadonator. [AP]

  • The record-breaking heat wave in the Pacific Northwest sent hundreds of people to hospital. The roads are also deformed in the intense heat. [BuzzFeed]

  • Iranian-backed militias in Syria fired rockets at US troops. US forces responded by firing artillery at the rocket firing positions. [WSJ]

  • Dr Anthony Fauci warns that the COVID-19 Delta variant will create “two Americas” as the gap between vaccinated and unvaccinated areas widens. [CNN]

  • The US real estate market continues to be hot. The average price of homes in major metropolitan areas has increased almost 15% in the past year. [WSJ]

  • Walmart is launching a cheaper version of insulin that will cost around $ 73 per vial. [CNBC]

  • Fox News host Tucker Carlson claimed the National Security Agency was spying on him. The agency basically called Carlson a liar. [Twitter]

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has berated senior officials in that country for failing to prevent a COVID-19 outbreak. [AP]

  • Video of the day: 87-year-old Senator Chuck Grassley pulled off 22 push-ups in a contest against much younger Senator Tom Cotton. [Twitter]

Wednesday Morning Utah News Roundup

Utah

  • A blood shortage could force Utah hospitals to delay procedures. [Tribune]

  • The “unofficial” LGBTQ pride march at BYU draws hundreds of people. [Tribune]

  • Utah is named the most independent state before July 4. [FOX13]

  • What will a gondola look like through Little Cottonwood Canyon? [KSL]

  • Investigators are examining the similarities between several apartment fires. [ABC4]

  • The Summit County Sheriff’s newest patrol sergeant is the first woman on duty. [Park Record]

COVID-19[feminine

  • Près de 1,4 million d’Utahns sont entièrement vaccinés contre le COVID-19. [Tribune]

  • COVID-19 is jeopardizing progress in children’s well-being, according to the KIDS Count report. [DNews]

  • UTA is extending its free rate for COVID-19 vaccinations by 3 months. [Standard Examiner]

Local government

  • SL Co. DA criticizes bills targeting transgender youth. [FOX13]

  • Lehi city council approves partial fireworks ban. [Daily Herald]

  • Orem’s board must decide how to spend $ 16 million. [Daily Herald]

Environment

Education

  • New SLC Schools Superintendent says students need someone like him. [KUTV]

  • Parents of children with disabilities struggle to find inclusive classrooms. [KUTV]

On opinion pages

  • Rachel Rueckert: Accept the bans. Fireworks kill you. [Tribune]

  • I found an apartment, but it certainly wasn’t easy, says the newly arrived Salt Lake Tribune reporter. [Tribune]

🎂 You say it’s your birthday? !!

Happy Birthday to Former State Representative Carl Wimmer and Former State Representative Sheryl Allen.

Do you have a birthday that you would like us to recognize in this space? Send us an e-mail.

– Tribune reporter Connor Sanders contributed to this story.



Source link

read more
Salt lake city

Salt Lake carpet company owner charged with rape, human trafficking

The Matheson Courthouse in Salt Lake City. A Salt Lake businessman who owns two carpet companies was charged Monday with seven felonies accusing him of sexually assaulting a 16-year-old woman and girl after meeting them on a Sugar Daddy dating site. (Spenser Heaps, Deseret News)

SALT LAKE CITY – A longtime Salt Lake businessman faces criminal charges accusing him of sexually assaulting two people, including a teenage girl, whom he met on a Sugar Daddy website.

Raffi J. Daghlian, 77, until recently continued to be active on the website and there could potentially be other victims, investigators said while uploading documents to the 3rd District Court.

Daghlian was charged Monday by the Utah attorney general’s office with rape, human trafficking and aggravated exploitation of child prostitution, all first degree felonies. He was also charged with three counts of forced sexual abuse, a second degree felony and trafficking in material injurious to a minor, a third degree felony.

Daghlian is the owner of Daghlian Rugs on Main and Daghlian Oriental Rugs and has also been involved in the restaurant industry in Salt Lake City.

He is accused of sexually abusing two people, a woman and a girl who was 16 at the time. Daghlian met the two victims on the Seeking Arrangements dating site, the attorney general’s office confirmed. The website promotes itself as a place “where beautiful, successful people nurture mutually beneficial relationships.”

“The purpose of the dating site was to match men who were willing to pay women money or spend money on women in exchange for dating,” the indictment documents say.

In July 2020, a 16-year-old girl told police she registered on the website and claimed she was 18. She began speaking with Daghlian and the two arranged to have a date “with the understanding that the accused would pay (her) a sum of money to go to dinner with him”, according to the charges.

At dinner, Daghlian made sexual advances to the girl, who responded by telling her “that she was not there to have sex, but rather to get money to pay her rent.” for having dinner with (Daghlian) ”, according to the charges.

After dinner, Daghlian took the girl to a carpet store he owned at 2364 S. Main. At the store, he forced her to undress and engage in sexual acts, according to the charges. The teenager said Daghlian would get “angry” if she didn’t comply, so she did as he asked because she was “afraid of what (Daghlian) would do.”

At the end of the “date,” the girl was paid $ 170, according to the charges.

Another woman told investigators that she met Daghlian on the same dating site in 2013. During their date, Daghlian “repeatedly tried to get (the woman) to drink alcohol. and made several references to sex and sexual relations, “according to the charges.

He took the woman to his carpet store at 1053 E. 2100 South and insisted she have another drink, then raped the woman inside the business, the prosecution documents show.

The woman immediately reported the assault to law enforcement in 2013. A DNA sample of her alleged attacker was taken from her dress. But according to court documents, “Daghlian’s DNA profile was never obtained or compared to the profile on the dress, and the investigation was never presented to a prosecution for screening criminal charges.”

After learning that charges had never been laid and that the case had never even been considered for potential charges in 2013, investigators from the attorney general’s office obtained a DNA sample from Daghlian’s son.

“By comparing the obtained male DNA believed to be (Daghlian’s) son to the DNA on the dress, it is indicated a 99.9999% probability that the DNA on the dress is from a person. having a family relationship with the son (ie the accused), ”investigators wrote in the charges.

An arrest warrant without bail was issued against Daghlian on Monday. Prosecutors say they will obtain a DNA sample from him when he is taken into custody and compare it with the DNA profile taken from the robe.

In each incident, Daghlian “is accused of using a social media dating site designed to match men who were willing to pay women money or spend money on women in return. dating, to lure women into his carpet business for sexual activity. When these women did not consent, he sexually assaulted them to satisfy his sexual desires, “the prosecution documents say.

“Two alleged independent victims reporting very similar sexual assaults suggest that the likelihood of a certain event occurring, such as wrongdoing in error or accusations against an innocent person, is unlikely,” the investigators wrote.

The attorney general’s office also noted in court documents that it was continuing “to investigate other allegations of sexual assault by the accused committed in a similar manner.” Prosecutors say Daghlian continues to be active on the dating site and “over a 90-day period in the fall of 2020, exchanged more than 6,000 messages.”

More stories that might interest you


Source link

read more
Utah economy

Overcoming Michigan regulatory barriers – InsideSources

With the Michigan government lifting all COVID-19 orders on public gatherings and mask requirements, the state economy is poised to recover from public health restrictions imposed by the government. It comes after Governor Gretchen Whitmer unilaterally issued nearly 200 Executive orders suspend, review and modify the main public policies having a direct impact on the behavior of the 10 million citizens and state enterprises. However, this is only the beginning of the regulatory challenge for Michigan small and medium business owners and entrepreneurs planning to fully reopen or start a new business.

Michigan is only one of eight states to report economic status decline above 5 percent in 2020. In addition, the state’s economic output declined 5.4 percent, from $ 471.6 billion in 2019 to $ 446.2 billion in 2020. unemployment rate for May 2021 remained 27% higher than before the February 2020 pandemic, and total employment is down 5.6% over the same period.

Although there is evidence, the Biden administration plans to increase regulation and raising taxes on U.S. businesses, that doesn’t mean state and local governments are powerless to ease potentially negative federal regulatory barriers to entrepreneurship and economic growth at the state level. And for Michigan, a recent study undertaken by Chris Edwards, director of tax policy studies at the Cato Libertarian Institute, offers insight into what state entrepreneurs face when it comes to overcoming state and local government regulatory hurdles when starting a new business.

A useful output of this study is the Entrepreneur Regulatory Barriers Index, an empirical calculation based on 17 variables in four general categories of regulatory restrictions. The variables (converted to a standardized score using a formula) measure the restrictions and costs imposed on new businesses in each state, while the four categories consist of small business views (three variables), professional licenses (two variables), other entry barriers (five variables) and costs created by regulation (seven variables).

So how does Michigan stack up against other states in this index? Unfortunately, not well. Michigan ranks 36th out of 50 states, at the bottom of the third quartile. What stands out are the results of the first category – small business views on regulation. While the Michigan government scores relatively high (on a choice scale of “F to A +”) (“B” among respondents on the “ease of starting a business” variable, the state has a lot of leeway. of progression for two variables, “labor and hiring laws” (“D +”) and “licensing laws” (“C-”). Regarding the category “other barriers to entry”, Michigan requires a “certificate of need” for the healthcare industry and is a liquor license quota and alcohol control state. “Whatever happens in Washington, state and local governments can do a lot to improve the business climate by repealing low-value and harmful regulations,” says Cato’s Edwards.

A starting point for the Michigan state government could be Analyzing state professional licensing laws to assess which professions need public regulation, and if so, what type (or “level”) of public regulation is necessary and effective. Such regulatory review of licensing requirements could reduce the cost of entry (a “barrier to entry”) into a trade, and potentially increase competition and lower the cost of service to the consumer.

A second initiative would be to consider the creation of a “regulatory sandbox” at the state level. In March 2021, Utah became the first state adopt bipartite legislation creating an “all-inclusive” or all-industry regulatory sandbox. A regulatory sandbox is a defined environment where innovative companies can safely experiment under the oversight and guidance of regulatory bodies. By reducing the initial regulatory costs for entering entrepreneurs, these early stage companies have the opportunity to become competitors capable of handling normal compliance costs, after which they “step out” of the regulatory sandbox. After the pandemic, this all-inclusive regulatory sandbox initiative would be a proposal that deserves serious consideration by the Michigan legislature.

In September 2020, Yelp Economic impact report estimated that 60% of businesses closed due to COVID-19 state and local government regulatory requirements would be closed permanently. There is no reason to believe that Michigan has not experienced similar business closure rates as the rest of the country. Now is the time for the Michigan Legislature and Governor Whitmer to come up with innovative bipartisan public policy initiatives to help the small and medium-sized businesses and entrepreneurs in the state who have been the businesses hardest hit by the effects of COVID- 19. Over the longer term, Michigan needs to develop its reputation as a destination state for entrepreneurs, and a more supportive regulatory environment will go a long way in achieving this.

read more
Salt lake city government

Olympian’s company received $ 10 million in pandemic bailout despite conflicting figures

PARK CITY, Utah – Allison Baver had a dream come true when she won an Olympic medal in short track speed skating.

In October 2019, she set her sights on the film and television industry by incorporating her own production company. When the pandemic arrived months later, Baver was among the business owners who sought help from the Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP.

The Small Business Administration reports that the average PPP loan was $ 206,000. Allison Baver Entertainment received the maximum amount of the program – $ 10 million.

Why Baver Entertainment needed so much is unclear. By email, Baver declined to answer FOX 13 questions and said she was not available until the end of July. Neither Baver nor anyone associated with his company has been charged with any crimes.

On social media, Baver recently posted articles saying she was visiting film festivals and filming locations.

According to data released by the Small Business Administration, which administers the PPP, Baver Entertainment said $ 8.6 million in aid was for payroll. The company said it has 430 employees.

But Baver Entertainment was telling the Utah Department of Workforce Services that it has between one and four employees.

The lower numbers would be more typical of a production company, says Marshall Moore, vice president of operations at Utah Film Studios in Park City. Production companies will hire more workers — actors, crew and support staff — when they shoot.

“You’ll get small budgets under a million dollars and sometimes they’ll work with 30 to 50 people,” Moore said. “And then you can go further. “

“Over a million dollars, 5 million to 10 million dollars, sometimes these teams are about 120 people and that includes the producers, the cameramen, the handles, the electricity,” he added.

What would it take to employ more than 400?

“I mean, for me it would be ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’,” Moore said. “It would be Marvel.”

The P3 is often described as a loan, but the loan can be canceled if the recipient maintains their payroll and only uses the money for other approved expenses, including utilities and rent or mortgage. Candidates were supposed to describe the expenses they had in February 2020.

“The purpose of the Paycheque Protection Program was to reduce unemployment,” said Richard Gordon, professor of law at Case Western Reserve University and director of its financial integrity unit.

He says the PPP did not require banks processing applications to verify that the borrower was telling the truth about their employees and their needs.

With the PPP, “the US government is actually the co-signer,” Gordon said. “So if the borrower doesn’t pay the US government back, that is, we, the taxpayer, will eventually pay off the loan.”

Baver is a native of Pennsylvania who moved to Utah to train. She made three Olympic teams. Baver won a bronze medal with a relay team at the 2010 Games.

For the PPP loan, Baver Entertainment turned to Pennsylvania-based Meridian Bank to process its request. The bank’s CEO declined to discuss the app with FOX 13.

Baver Entertainment has production credit this year for a drama starring actor Elijah Wood titled “No Man of God”. IMDB says Baver Entertainment provided funding.

Gordon, who hasn’t researched Baver Entertainment and only talks in general, said PPP can’t be used as capital to grow. He also doesn’t think funding for a film would be allowed under the PPP unless everyone on set is on the recipient’s payroll in February 2020.

“I think Congress could have made this pretty close to the absence of fraud if it was handled by the Internal Revenue Service,” Gordon said.

The IRS “knows our employees. They know exactly how much they are paid because they know how much they are being withheld. Only three other Utah companies have received $ 10 million, according to a Salt Lake Tribune analysis of PPP data. These three were all in business long before Baver Entertainment.

Some more established production companies have received much less from the PPP. The Jim Henson Co. asked for $ 2.3 million and said it has 110 employees.

New Regency Productions, the film company behind films such as “The Revenant,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” and the latest release of “Little Women,” received $ 1 million and reported 50 employees.

In December, Variety attributed to Baver that his upcoming productions included a horror comedy now called “Monsters.” When FOX 13 reached out to the writer-director named in the article, his rep responded by saying that the project had been put on hold when the pandemic arrived and they had heard nothing more.

Baver also told the news site that his company was working on a horror film called “Dead Princess”. Production was halted by the pandemic and is expected to resume this year.

Baver Entertainment’s listed address is the former Olympian’s townhouse in Taylorsville. According to documents filed with the Salt Lake County Recorder, the Baver Homeowners Association filed a notice in January 2020 that the townhouse was behind on its fees; the HOA was planning to sell the property to settle the debt.

In July 2020, about three months after Baver Entertainment received the $ 10 million, the HOA filed a new notice stating that the debt had been paid. The sale was canceled.


Source link

read more
Salt lake city

Five-alarm apartment fire in Salt Lake City

SALT LAKE CITY – Salt Lake City fire crews responded to a five-alarm fire at the Incline Terrace apartments near 1000 East and 425 South after it was reported just after 2 a.m. Monday morning.

Fire captain Anthony Burton said as soon as the first engines left their posts to intervene they could see flames and smoke from a distance and called for reinforcements. Upon arrival, he said firefighters encountered several people in the six-story building trying to evacuate windows and balconies.

With a fire of this magnitude, Burton said crews would be at the site for some time. “We have several agencies here, a five-alarm structure fire is helping each other,” Burton said.

“Unfortunately, we have a fire to put out, we have water damage and we have an investigation to do, which means it will take some time for these people to be displaced for a while before they can come back to recover. their business and try to reoccupy yourself.

“The most important thing is that no one is left behind, and they are humans in beds, which is why we are here.”

The good news, Burton said, is that everyone has been found and no residents or firefighters have been injured.

The fire department is asking people to avoid the area between 900 and 1300 east on 400 and 500 south as they continue to work throughout the morning.


Source link

read more
Utah economy

Boise teams face off in the final of the Wild West region youth football tournament

BOISE, Idaho – The Regional Far West The youth soccer tournament features seven boys and girls divisions, 190 teams, and on Sunday two teams from Boise made it to the final.

Boise has hosted teams from 14 different states in the west, tournament officials tell us the tournament brings together around 10,000 people and generates between $ 8 million and $ 10 million for the local economy.

“The excitement this generates is just amazing, just go talk to one of the local restaurants or hotels or one of the local businesses that have received a huge hit and after what we have been facing the month last one is fantastic, ”said Craig Warner of Idaho Youth. Football. “The crowd that we just had, I guess some of them don’t even have kids in football, but they just came to support the home team.”

In the U-14 boys’ final, the Boise Boise faced Los Angeles Total Football Academy as the Boise boys attempted to become the first boys’ team to win this tournament.

The Timbers scored first on a nice goal from Grayson Clark, but LA would respond with two goals to take a 2-1 lead before halftime.

In the second half, the Timbers tied, but three consecutive LA goals were too hard to overcome and LA beat Boise 5-3, but the Timbers still had a great run in this tournament.

“For these guys to go through a full regional roster like they’ve done winning every group game, quarterfinal and semi-final against some powerful states is a statement in itself,” coach Eric Simmonsen said. . You haven’t had one last year as a U-13, they haven’t had such an impressive Cup of State.

The tournament also showcased the talent of football here in the Treasure Valley as the U-19/20 Boise Thorns women’s team and Boise Timbers U-18 advanced to the semi-finals before losing.

“Because you have the best teams from 14 states here, you have a lot of college coaches from different divisions and they can watch these teams,” Warner said. “They can be identified right here in their local town without having to travel halfway across the country.”

Even though the loss to the U-14 Boys hurt, coach Simmonsen believes this group has a good chance of becoming the first boys’ team to win the regional championship, but he also feels they might have to face off against it. the LA club. in the years to come.

“They had 5 or 6 more chances to win the very first men’s regional championship, I think that is a testament to them and what they faced during those times,” said Simmonsen. “I think it’s a good message to people on the whole that unusual times create things that are pretty rare and sometimes it’s okay to be rare.”

The Boise Thorns U-16 girls were beaten by Utah’s La Roca 2-1 in the championship game as the team nearly became the second women’s team to win this tournament.

read more
Salt lakes real estate

The Iconic Manasquan Inlet Favorite in the Market for Lots of Money

It’s not just the picturesque views of the Manasquan River and Manasquan Inlet or the food or dishes that make this establishment so special. It’s the memories. Countless families have walked through after a day at Manasquan Beach or Seawatch Beach and ended the night nearby watching fireworks. Countless employees have spent their summers serving food, drinks, and desserts while bringing smiles to their customers. Countless memories have been created by, dare I say it, millions of locals and tourists over the past 80 years. Now this great business is for sale and the price is just as memorable.

Listen to JB Afternoon on 92.7 WOBM and download our free 92.7 WOBM app.

Credit: Via Carlson’s Corner

Is that Carlson’s Corner that you remember? It is now on sale and the price surprised me. More on that below.

Credit: Via Carlson’s Corner

A look at some of their employees at the time. I don’t have the year the photo above was taken, but it looks to me like the mid 50’s. I’m not a car / truck expert, but it looks like it was. taken during this decade depending on the appearance and style of individual clothing.

Credit: Via Carlson’s Corner

This is another throwback from the Carlson’s Corner website. The value of the company would have been only a fraction of what it is today. According to Weebly, the average price of an ice cream cone in the 1950s was around 10 cents. Today it’s $ 4. Wow.

Credit: Via Carlson’s Corner

Today it looks like this. Located at 432 First Avenue in Manasquan, Carlson’s Corner offers beautiful views, great food and a great pitch:

You are on the Jersey Shore. We know how it is. it’s hot. The weather is nice. The weather is absolutely beautiful, but you are hungry, thirsty and need to cool off. Carlson’s Corner has the cure! Go downstairs and put an end to your hunger with a delicious burger, chicken sandwich or wrap from Original Carlson. Quench your thirst with ice water or a variety of soft drinks. Top it off with the best ice cream ever. Enjoy it all while taking in picturesque views of the Manasquan Inlet and River. Come see us today! – The Carlson’s Corner site

So what is the price charged by Carlson’s Corner?

According to the list, they are asking for $ 1.7 million. While that sounds like a lot, keep all of the factors I described above (location, views, customers, etc.) in mind. Listing agent shares: “The iconic Carlson’s Corner is a thriving seasonal establishment frequented by surfers, fishermen, beachgoers and creek watchers. On Thursday nights in the summer, the queue for ice cream will spread along the sidewalk with people gathering to see weekly fireworks displays on the beaches of Point Pleasant. ” Hope the new owners carry on the tradition and satisfy customers with great service, friendly faces and fantastic food!

WATCH: Here are the 25 Best Places to Live in New Jersey

Stacker has compiled a list of the best places to live in New Jersey using data from Niche. Niche ranks places to live based on a variety of factors including cost of living, schools, healthcare, recreation, and weather. Cities, suburbs and villages have been included. Ads and images are from realtor.com.

On the list, there is a solid mix of offerings ranging from large schools and nightlife to public and pedestrian parks. Some regions have experienced rapid growth thanks to the installation of new businesses in the region, while others offer a glimpse into the history of the region with well-preserved architecture and museums. Read on to see if your hometown makes the list.

WATCH: This is the richest city in every state

Just saying the names of these towns immediately conjures up images of grand mansions, fancy cars, and fancy restaurants. Read on to see which city in your home state received the title of richest place and which place had the highest median income in the country. Who knows, your hometown might even be on this list.


Source link

read more
Salt lake city government

Drought issues in dry western US raise fears of July 4th fireworks

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – Many Americans seeking normalcy as pandemic restrictions end are anxiously awaiting the traditional July 4 fireworks display. But with a historic drought in the western United States and fears of another devastating wildfire season, authorities are canceling exhibits, banning setting off fireworks, or calling for caution.

Fireworks have already caused a few small wildfires, including one started by a child in northern Utah and another in central California. Last year, a pyrotechnic device designed to celebrate a baby’s gender reveal sparked a fire in California that killed a firefighter during a season of wildfires in the United States that burned the second largest land area in nearly 40 years.

Parts of the American West are experiencing their worst drought conditions in more than a century this year, said Jennifer Balch, director of the Earth Lab at the University of Colorado. People setting off fireworks in the home are of concern due to both the powder magazine conditions conducive to wildfire outbreaks and the threat of injury. Last year, injuries hit their highest level in 15 years after the pandemic canceled large gatherings, federal data showed.

“As a fire specialist, I am preparing for this fire season due to the drought and heat already present,” Balch said. “I think the fireworks right now is a terrible idea.”

Fireworks industry professionals, who have also stressed caution in drought-prone areas, expect strong sales despite a shortage caused by pandemic-related manufacturing downturns and disruptions commercial.

“We think we’re going to have a great year,” said James Fuller, a fireworks safety expert at Alabama-based TNT Fireworks.

While fireworks are an integral part of the nation’s Independence Day celebrations, they light thousands of fires a year, including one that burned down Bobbie Uno’s home in Clearfield, Utah, l ‘last year. She had to jump out of the way before it hit the side of her house.

“In five seconds my house, from the bushes to the roof, was on fire,” Uno said. The fire caused $ 60,000 in damage and forced her family out of their home for weeks.

“I want everyone to be aware of the danger because it’s scary even in a little cul-de-sac,” Uno said.

Several Utah cities are banning people from setting off their own fireworks this year during the record drought, but many Republicans are against a statewide ban. Salt Lake County Councilor Aimee Winder Newton supports the restrictions but thinks this year is a bad time for a blanket ban.

“We’re just coming out of this pandemic where people already felt like the government was restraining them in so many ways,” she said. “When you pronounce bans arbitrarily, we might have a situation where people who weren’t going to light fireworks will voluntarily buy fireworks just to send a message to the government.”

State fireworks laws vary widely across the United States, but local bans on personal fireworks are appearing from Montana to Oregon, which has been hit by massive wildfires the last year.

In Arizona, already ravaged by more than a dozen wildfires, many cities have called off their public fireworks displays. The Yavapai-Apache Nation typically holds an exhibit outside of their casino near Camp Verde in central Arizona.

“This year, with worse conditions than last year, we decided in May that we would not have fireworks,” said James Perry, spokesperson for the tribe’s Cliff Castle Casino Hotel. “Based on the large fires currently burning in and around our community, we are happy with our decision. “

It’s a similar story in Colorado, where dozens of shows have been scuttled, most notably in Steamboat Springs, a ski town where firefighters are already scattered around.

“The grass always catches fire… why are we doing something that causes fire when fire is our biggest problem?” Said Winnie DelliQuadri, the city’s special projects manager.

But in neighboring Wyoming, business is booming in fireworks shops, including sales of banned items elsewhere. Parking lots fill up on weekends and many cars have foreign license plates.

“It’s not just Colorado,” said Ben Laws, director of Pyro City. “We see people from Nebraska, we see people from Montana, we see people from all over come and buy.”

Other cities, including Boise, Idaho and Santa Fe, New Mexico, are working to ban personal fireworks while keeping their exhibits public, where safety precautions are often stricter and firefighters are in alert.

In North Dakota, where more than two-thirds of the state experiences extreme or exceptional drought – the two worst categories – some areas are passing local bans. In South Dakota, where conditions are a little less difficult, the governor is fighting the federal government to organize a fireworks display at Mount Rushmore.

A show that draws tens of thousands of people to Lake Tahoe, Nevada, near the California state border, was initially canceled for the second year in a row, but organizers subsequently decided to host an “experience of smaller and safer fireworks “. Holding fireworks over the water is one of the safest ways to celebrate, said Professor Balch.

The industry is urging people who light their own fireworks to follow local restrictions, choose a flat location a safe distance from homes, have a source of water on hand to extinguish used products and dispose of with care.

Some security officials would prefer people to avoid lighting their own fireworks all together. Michele Steinberg of the National Fire Protection Association pointed to federal data showing 15,600 Americans attended emergency rooms with fireworks-related injuries last year, thousands more than the year before.

“I love watching fireworks, but honestly they’re not safe in the hands of consumers,” she said. “Even a sparkler can reach up to 1,200 degrees, which is actually the heat of a forest fire.”

___

Associated Press editors Felicia Fonseca in Flagstaff, Arizona; Mead Gruver in Cheyenne, Wyoming; Cedar Attanasio in Santa Fe, New Mexico; Scott Sonner in Reno, Nevada; and Associated Press / Report for America, Corps member Patty Nieberg in Denver, contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2021. All rights reserved. This website is not intended for users located in the European Economic Area.


Source link

read more
1 2 3 7
Page 1 of 7